Star Trek Latest News http://startrek.com Star Trek Latest News Sat, 24 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700 info@startrek.com (Star Trek Team) en <![CDATA[Explore the Smithsonian in Klingon]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/explore-the-smithsonian-in-klingon

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is one of the galaxy’s most popular tourist destinations, and celebrates infinite diversity in infinite combinations among its visitors. Although we are fairly certain there are no longer undercover Klingon agents on staff, we welcome citizens of the planet Kronos to explore the history of flight on Earth alongside our terrestrial visitors.

To help increase Klingon visitorship, we turned to Earth’s premier extraterrestrial linguist and former Smithsonian post-doctoral fellow, Marc Okrand. Okrand developed the Klingon and Vulcan languages for the Star Trek franchise, and was kind enough to translate and record a 60-minute highlights tour and in the Museum’s new app GO FLIGHT.

The tour, which can be enjoyed from anywhere on or off the planet, includes six of the Museum’s most iconic artifacts, some of which required creative interpretation for our interstellar audiences. The Spirit of St. Louis became St. Louis toDuj (Mettle of St. Louis), while John Glenn’s Mercury spacecraft became “Mercury jup ghom Soch” (“Group of Friends 7”), because there is no Klingonese word for “friend.”

The original studio model of the starship Enterprise, now ship-shape after two years of extensive restoration work, is not included in the tour to avoid revealing sensitive Federation technology (the ship will not launch until 2245) or provoking our Klingon visitors (full peace between our worlds will not occur until the Khitomer Accords in 2293, and the Enterprise will play an important role in the intervening cold war). For the tour with text or an English version of the same tour, download the free official app. Go here to listen to the audio clips. 

For more Okrand outtakes, check out the behind-the-scenes video of the recording session where we gained insight into what it was like creating and filming the Klingon language.

Visitors around the world can share their Star Trek stories with us and follow the fun with #BoldlyGo50.

]]>

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is one of the galaxy’s most popular tourist destinations, and celebrates infinite diversity in infinite combinations among its visitors. Although we are fairly certain there are no longer undercover Klingon agents on staff, we welcome citizens of the planet Kronos to explore the history of flight on Earth alongside our terrestrial visitors.

To help increase Klingon visitorship, we turned to Earth’s premier extraterrestrial linguist and former Smithsonian post-doctoral fellow, Marc Okrand. Okrand developed the Klingon and Vulcan languages for the Star Trek franchise, and was kind enough to translate and record a 60-minute highlights tour and in the Museum’s new app GO FLIGHT.

The tour, which can be enjoyed from anywhere on or off the planet, includes six of the Museum’s most iconic artifacts, some of which required creative interpretation for our interstellar audiences. The Spirit of St. Louis became St. Louis toDuj (Mettle of St. Louis), while John Glenn’s Mercury spacecraft became “Mercury jup ghom Soch” (“Group of Friends 7”), because there is no Klingonese word for “friend.”

The original studio model of the starship Enterprise, now ship-shape after two years of extensive restoration work, is not included in the tour to avoid revealing sensitive Federation technology (the ship will not launch until 2245) or provoking our Klingon visitors (full peace between our worlds will not occur until the Khitomer Accords in 2293, and the Enterprise will play an important role in the intervening cold war). For the tour with text or an English version of the same tour, download the free official app. Go here to listen to the audio clips. 

For more Okrand outtakes, check out the behind-the-scenes video of the recording session where we gained insight into what it was like creating and filming the Klingon language.

Visitors around the world can share their Star Trek stories with us and follow the fun with #BoldlyGo50.

]]>
explore-the-smithsonian-in-klingon Sat, 24 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Last Call: Mission NY Merchandise]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mission-ny-merch-still-available

Didn't snag that Star Trek: Mission New York merchandise you wanted at the show, either because you ran out of time or they ran out of products? Well, it's not too late. Now through September 30, the ReedPop Supply Co. online store will be taking orders for a variety of Trek and STMNY items, including t-shirts, hoodies, field bags and pins.

Go to www.reedpopsupply.com for details and to purchase.

]]>

Didn't snag that Star Trek: Mission New York merchandise you wanted at the show, either because you ran out of time or they ran out of products? Well, it's not too late. Now through September 30, the ReedPop Supply Co. online store will be taking orders for a variety of Trek and STMNY items, including t-shirts, hoodies, field bags and pins.

Go to www.reedpopsupply.com for details and to purchase.

]]>
mission-ny-merch-still-available Sat, 24 Sep 2016 06:30:59 -0700
<![CDATA[Crusher Reunion Set for DSTE ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/crusher-reunion-set-for-dste

It'll be a Crusher mother and son reunion at Destination Star Trek Europe next month, as Gates McFadden has just been confirmed for the event, and she'll join her screen son, the already announced Wil Wheaton, on stage. And, for those who can't get enough of the Dr. Crusher-Wesley combination, McFadden and Wheaton are set to pose together for photos.

Star Trek's Gate McFadden & Wil Wheaton

Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. In addition to McFadden and Wheaton, other celebrity guests will include William Shatner, George Takei, Walter Koenig, Christopher Lloyd, Terry Farrell, Marina Sirtis, Robert Duncan McNeill, Alexander Siddig, Nicole de Boer, Martha Hackett, Max Grodenchik, Robert O'Reilly, Armin Shimerman, Jeffrey Combs, Casey Biggs, Eddie Paskey, Eric Pierpoint, Vaughn Armstrong, Connor Trinneer, Alice Krige, Dominic Keating, Garrett Wang, Chase Masterson and Bobby Clark. All of the stars will talk on stage and be available for autographs and photo ops.

Wil Wheaton in Star Trek

Beyond the guests, fans can enjoy a galaxy of parties and other activities. Following a day of convention fun on Friday, fans can slip into their finest Starfleet attire and beam over to the Federation Ball, to be held at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole (a five-minute walk from the venue). Then, on Saturday, William Shatner will perform his popular one-man show, Shatner's World, for the first time in the UK, with the performance taking place on The Enterprise Stage at the NEC.

Destination Star Trek Europe: Quark's Bar and Casino

Saturday will also boast the Saturday Night Party at Quark's Bar and Casino, which will feature entertainment by the fan-favorite Star Trek Rat Pack, a/k/a Armin Shimerman, Max Grodenchik, Vaughn Armstrong, Jeffrey Combs and Casey Biggs. The party will take place at Hilton Birmingham Metropole. Tickets for the Shatner performance and parties are on sale now, both as separate admissions and as part of various packages. Other activities will include the opportunity to explore interactive exhibits and learn about Star Trek’s impact on science, space and technology.

For additional details and to purchase tickets to DSTE, go to www.destinationstartrek.com.

]]>

It'll be a Crusher mother and son reunion at Destination Star Trek Europe next month, as Gates McFadden has just been confirmed for the event, and she'll join her screen son, the already announced Wil Wheaton, on stage. And, for those who can't get enough of the Dr. Crusher-Wesley combination, McFadden and Wheaton are set to pose together for photos.

Star Trek's Gate McFadden & Wil Wheaton

Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. In addition to McFadden and Wheaton, other celebrity guests will include William Shatner, George Takei, Walter Koenig, Christopher Lloyd, Terry Farrell, Marina Sirtis, Robert Duncan McNeill, Alexander Siddig, Nicole de Boer, Martha Hackett, Max Grodenchik, Robert O'Reilly, Armin Shimerman, Jeffrey Combs, Casey Biggs, Eddie Paskey, Eric Pierpoint, Vaughn Armstrong, Connor Trinneer, Alice Krige, Dominic Keating, Garrett Wang, Chase Masterson and Bobby Clark. All of the stars will talk on stage and be available for autographs and photo ops.

Wil Wheaton in Star Trek

Beyond the guests, fans can enjoy a galaxy of parties and other activities. Following a day of convention fun on Friday, fans can slip into their finest Starfleet attire and beam over to the Federation Ball, to be held at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole (a five-minute walk from the venue). Then, on Saturday, William Shatner will perform his popular one-man show, Shatner's World, for the first time in the UK, with the performance taking place on The Enterprise Stage at the NEC.

Destination Star Trek Europe: Quark's Bar and Casino

Saturday will also boast the Saturday Night Party at Quark's Bar and Casino, which will feature entertainment by the fan-favorite Star Trek Rat Pack, a/k/a Armin Shimerman, Max Grodenchik, Vaughn Armstrong, Jeffrey Combs and Casey Biggs. The party will take place at Hilton Birmingham Metropole. Tickets for the Shatner performance and parties are on sale now, both as separate admissions and as part of various packages. Other activities will include the opportunity to explore interactive exhibits and learn about Star Trek’s impact on science, space and technology.

For additional details and to purchase tickets to DSTE, go to www.destinationstartrek.com.

]]>
crusher-reunion-set-for-dste Fri, 23 Sep 2016 10:30:00 -0700
<![CDATA[A Look Back at Trek's Second Pilot]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/a-look-back-at-treks-second-pilot

"Where No Man Has Gone Before" aired 50 years ago yesterday. And following on yesterday's guest blog by David Tilotta and Curt McAloney, which explored the making of the episode, StarTrek.com takes another deep dive into the episode today. As most fans know, "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not the first Star Trek: The Original Series hour to run. "The Man Trap" and "Charlie X" ran first. However, "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was a vitally important hour, as it was Gene Roddenberry's second pilot for Star Trek, and the one that convinced NBC to green light the series after having rejected Roddenberry's first stab at a pilot, "The Cage."

Some facts, figures, thoughts and quotes pertaining to "Where No Man Has Gone Before" --

The poem "Nightingale Woman" was written by Gene Roddenberry about... the plane he flew during World War II.

Gary Lockwood, who played Lt. Commander Gary Mitchell, had previously worked with Roddenberry on The Lieutenant. Lockwood, of course, went on to greater sci-fi fame in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey. Sally Kellerman, who portrayed Dr. Elizabeth Dehner, went on to star as Major Margaret "Hotlips" Houlihan in the film M*A*S*H.

The phaser rifle made its one and only appearance in this episode.

Bees swarmed the set on July 23, 1965, the fifth day of production. They stung William Shatner and Sally Kellerman.

Memory Alpha notes that "the aired version of this episode features a different version of the first season opening credits, which does not have William Shatner's opening narration, and uses a different orchestration of the main and end title themes. These orchestrations were used until mid-season during the original run and the initial syndication showings."

One of the best lines in the episode was Kirk's frustrated plea to Spock: "Will you try for one moment to feel? At least act like you've got a heart."

Another memorable bit of dialogue, uttered by Mitchell to Kirk: "You should've killed me while you could, James. Command and compassion are a fool's mixture."

Though the captain's name is James T. Kirk, the gravestone Mitchell erected for him reads James R. Kirk.

The writer Samuel A. Peeples handed in his first story outline for the episode in April, 1965. That's not a typo. The year was 1965.

According to Memory Alpha, "the voices of damage control personnel responding to the emergency situation were reused many times in subsequent episodes. These voices were provided by Gene Roddenberry, Robert Justman, Majel Barrett, Herb Solow, and other production staff members, including some from Mission: Impossible. Roddenberry can be heard saying, 'Communicator, we need more lines to the impulse deck!' in subsequent episodes.'"

The episode did not include DeForest Kelley as Dr. McCoy, but rather Paul Fix as Doctor Piper. Eddie Paskey appeared as Lt. Leslie, but went uncredited. Nichelle Nichols was not in the episode, either.

Director James R. Goldstone helmed one other TOS episode, "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" He passed away on November 5, 1999 at the age of 68.

Memory Alpha notes that "Where No Man Has Gone Before" is both the only episode of the series in which James Doohan (Scotty) appears but DeForest Kelley (McCoy) does not, and is also the only episode where Spock and Scotty wear gold and tan tunics instead of their better known blue and red, respectively.

Talking to StarTrek.com about the episode, Trek's longevity and her and Lockwood's enduring association with Trek, Kellerman said, "(Lockwood and I) had no idea we’d be talking about it (50) years later, but it’s really great. It’s like the gift that keeps on giving. We really had nothing to do with it. We just happened to be in the episode."

]]>

"Where No Man Has Gone Before" aired 50 years ago yesterday. And following on yesterday's guest blog by David Tilotta and Curt McAloney, which explored the making of the episode, StarTrek.com takes another deep dive into the episode today. As most fans know, "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not the first Star Trek: The Original Series hour to run. "The Man Trap" and "Charlie X" ran first. However, "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was a vitally important hour, as it was Gene Roddenberry's second pilot for Star Trek, and the one that convinced NBC to green light the series after having rejected Roddenberry's first stab at a pilot, "The Cage."

Some facts, figures, thoughts and quotes pertaining to "Where No Man Has Gone Before" --

The poem "Nightingale Woman" was written by Gene Roddenberry about... the plane he flew during World War II.

Gary Lockwood, who played Lt. Commander Gary Mitchell, had previously worked with Roddenberry on The Lieutenant. Lockwood, of course, went on to greater sci-fi fame in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey. Sally Kellerman, who portrayed Dr. Elizabeth Dehner, went on to star as Major Margaret "Hotlips" Houlihan in the film M*A*S*H.

The phaser rifle made its one and only appearance in this episode.

Bees swarmed the set on July 23, 1965, the fifth day of production. They stung William Shatner and Sally Kellerman.

Memory Alpha notes that "the aired version of this episode features a different version of the first season opening credits, which does not have William Shatner's opening narration, and uses a different orchestration of the main and end title themes. These orchestrations were used until mid-season during the original run and the initial syndication showings."

One of the best lines in the episode was Kirk's frustrated plea to Spock: "Will you try for one moment to feel? At least act like you've got a heart."

Another memorable bit of dialogue, uttered by Mitchell to Kirk: "You should've killed me while you could, James. Command and compassion are a fool's mixture."

Though the captain's name is James T. Kirk, the gravestone Mitchell erected for him reads James R. Kirk.

The writer Samuel A. Peeples handed in his first story outline for the episode in April, 1965. That's not a typo. The year was 1965.

According to Memory Alpha, "the voices of damage control personnel responding to the emergency situation were reused many times in subsequent episodes. These voices were provided by Gene Roddenberry, Robert Justman, Majel Barrett, Herb Solow, and other production staff members, including some from Mission: Impossible. Roddenberry can be heard saying, 'Communicator, we need more lines to the impulse deck!' in subsequent episodes.'"

The episode did not include DeForest Kelley as Dr. McCoy, but rather Paul Fix as Doctor Piper. Eddie Paskey appeared as Lt. Leslie, but went uncredited. Nichelle Nichols was not in the episode, either.

Director James R. Goldstone helmed one other TOS episode, "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" He passed away on November 5, 1999 at the age of 68.

Memory Alpha notes that "Where No Man Has Gone Before" is both the only episode of the series in which James Doohan (Scotty) appears but DeForest Kelley (McCoy) does not, and is also the only episode where Spock and Scotty wear gold and tan tunics instead of their better known blue and red, respectively.

Talking to StarTrek.com about the episode, Trek's longevity and her and Lockwood's enduring association with Trek, Kellerman said, "(Lockwood and I) had no idea we’d be talking about it (50) years later, but it’s really great. It’s like the gift that keeps on giving. We really had nothing to do with it. We just happened to be in the episode."

]]>
a-look-back-at-treks-second-pilot Fri, 23 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Fleet Station K-13 Returns]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/fleet-station-k-13-returns

When some Federation Captains find a dilapidated old spaceship floating out in the void of space, they scrap it and think nothing more of it. But a more insightful Captain might see that old broken down wreck as more of an opportunity to restore a piece of history from a bygone era. Time may pass, but a classic will always be just that: a classic. In terms of scale, a ship is far too small with what will be coming soon to Tribble: let’s talk about space stations. More specifically, let’s talk about a new (old) fleet holding.

Star Trek Online Fleet Leader Characters

Fleet Leaders will soon find themselves the proud new owners of a somewhat neglected piece of 23rd century history in dire need of some TLC, located high in orbit above a picturesque alien planet. But why update a space station to look like all the others, when your fleet could restore it to its former glory? Technology has certainly improved since those days of old, and it will be up to Fleets to retrofit old aesthetics with new capabilities.

Star Trek Online Technology

A space station that serves as homage to the past wouldn’t be complete without retrofit technologies from that era. As Fleets fix up the space station, they will gain access to an armory of era appropriate weapons and kit modules. Cryo-tubes and stasis-pens hold Federation and Klingon officers waiting to be released and put back into duty, and are eager to lend their old school ingenuity to your galactic restoration efforts.

Star Trek Online Space Station

This old space station once held the distinction of studying alien biology and technology, and information gleaned from those studies still exist on data banks waiting to be repaired and put to use in defending the quadrants from exotic threats. Fleets will find blueprints and schematics to new Engineering ship consoles, as well as some interesting weapons encountered in The Original Series.

We hope you and your fleet will enjoy restoring this classic piece of technology, and reliving the aesthetic of a bygone age. It’s time to bring this beauty back to life, and you have the keys.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>

When some Federation Captains find a dilapidated old spaceship floating out in the void of space, they scrap it and think nothing more of it. But a more insightful Captain might see that old broken down wreck as more of an opportunity to restore a piece of history from a bygone era. Time may pass, but a classic will always be just that: a classic. In terms of scale, a ship is far too small with what will be coming soon to Tribble: let’s talk about space stations. More specifically, let’s talk about a new (old) fleet holding.

Star Trek Online Fleet Leader Characters

Fleet Leaders will soon find themselves the proud new owners of a somewhat neglected piece of 23rd century history in dire need of some TLC, located high in orbit above a picturesque alien planet. But why update a space station to look like all the others, when your fleet could restore it to its former glory? Technology has certainly improved since those days of old, and it will be up to Fleets to retrofit old aesthetics with new capabilities.

Star Trek Online Technology

A space station that serves as homage to the past wouldn’t be complete without retrofit technologies from that era. As Fleets fix up the space station, they will gain access to an armory of era appropriate weapons and kit modules. Cryo-tubes and stasis-pens hold Federation and Klingon officers waiting to be released and put back into duty, and are eager to lend their old school ingenuity to your galactic restoration efforts.

Star Trek Online Space Station

This old space station once held the distinction of studying alien biology and technology, and information gleaned from those studies still exist on data banks waiting to be repaired and put to use in defending the quadrants from exotic threats. Fleets will find blueprints and schematics to new Engineering ship consoles, as well as some interesting weapons encountered in The Original Series.

We hope you and your fleet will enjoy restoring this classic piece of technology, and reliving the aesthetic of a bygone age. It’s time to bring this beauty back to life, and you have the keys.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>
fleet-station-k-13-returns Fri, 23 Sep 2016 03:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[50 Years Later: Where No Man Has Gone Before ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/50-years-later-where-no-man-has-gone-before

Where No Man Has Gone Before” was the second pilot made for Star Trek, and it came about because “The Cage,” the first pilot, failed to sell the series to the NBC network. As we mentioned in last month’s article, the executives at the network realized after viewing “The Cage” that Gene Roddenberry and Desilu Studios could produce mature science fiction, but that the story they told in that first adventure wasn’t what NBC was looking for. Thus, the network took an unusual step and requested another pilot for the series. This time, however, they made it clear to Roddenberry that they wanted a simpler, less erotic action-adventure story and a somewhat different cast.

So, with those marching orders, Roddenberry went to work retooling Star Trek. He fleshed out not only his ideas for a new story concept, but he also invited other writers to pitch theirs. Finally, out of three possibilities (“Where No Man Has Gone Before” by Samuel A. Peeples, “Mudd’s Women” by Stephen Kandel and “The Omega Glory” by Gene Roddenberry), “Where No Man Has Gone Before” was selected by the network to put into production. This story was on the mark, as far as NBC was concerned, because it gave them almost everything they asked for. And, after the network viewed the finished film, they were sold… and so was Star Trek. The Original Series was officially green lit, and that started its historic trek to television.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the television premiere of “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” we thought we’d explore the galactic barrier and present two behind-the-scenes snippets about it.

Mr. Mitchell, we’re leaving the galaxy. Ahead, warp factor one.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Viewing the Galactic Barrier

Most of the viewing displays in “The Cage” – for example the one in the briefing room and the monitors above the bridge stations – were frosted screens that had slides and motion pictures rear projected onto them. Although this approach was tedious and noisy (and expensive, as they had to pay the projector operators), rear projection allowed the actors to see and react in real time to what was displayed. This wasn’t the case, however, for the viewing screens in “Where No Man Has Gone Before” and the rest of the episodes, more or less. For the most part, the active graphics on the viewing screens from the second pilot onwards were separate optical elements that were inserted into them in post-production. This meant, of course, that the actors had to use their craft to imagine what they were not seeing.

As an example of the optical effects work that was used to insert images on the main viewing screen (MVS), here’s a photo sequence from “Where No Man Has Gone Before” that shows how the galactic barrier was placed on it.Star Trek: The Original Series

The large photo on the left in the above collage is from a frame of film showing William Shatner watching the MVS as the scene is slated by John Eckert. The black area in the interior of the screen is the “hole” that’s been added to it in post-production and will be the place where the footage of the barrier display will be added. The upper photo on the right shows a frame from galactic barrier footage that will be inserted into the MVS. According to the script, the galactic barrier was to resemble an aurora borealis, so it was created, in part, by flooding a brightly-lit cloud tank with colored ink/paint and photographing the results. Using the optical printer, the completed footage of the barrier was then matted (masked) to the size of the MVS. Finally, the matted galactic barrier film was rephotographed together with the footage of the MVS with the “hole” in it to complete the effect as shown in the bottom right photo.

Rejected Barrier Effects

When the Enterprise encountered the galactic barrier in the first act, it wreaked havoc on the ship and its crew. On the bridge, we saw electronic panels exploding and Elizabeth Dehner and Gary Mitchell (Gary Lockwood) turning negative as they got shocked with thick, sparking lines. (An example of this latter effect, done in post-production via mattes and animation techniques, is shown below.)

Star Trek: The Original Series

Interestingly, though, this entire sequence originally had different effects that, for unknown reasons, were left on the cutting room floor. Presented below are photos from frames of black and white daily footage that show them, and please note that the captions for the letters in the bottom corners of the pictures can be found after the collage.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Photo A: This first frame comes from before the scene began and shows the cast relaxing before the action started. The technicians in front of the navigation console and on the far right are preparing flash pots (containers holding special pyrotechnic powder) for the soon-to-be-happening explosion and related shower effects.

Photo B: After the director called for action, the bridge was filled with smoke to create the illusion of off-stage fire and a scissor arc lamp was fired to simulate the flash of light for the static electric “lightning bolt” from the barrier. Of course, the lightning bolt striking the bridge panel (denoted by the yellow arrow) was added in post-production and was not seen in the completed and broadcast episode.

Photo C: After being zapped by the barrier lightening, the bridge panel then erupted in a shower of sparks courtesy of a flash pot.

Photo D: Later in this scene, the flash pot on the navigation console was ignited and, simultaneously, Gary Mitchell got hit with several bolts of static electricity that amplified his “Esper” ability (courtesy of optical effects and denoted by the yellow arrows). It’s interesting that the animation effects in this discarded sequence are different from those used in the finished episode (shown earlier) but similar to the ones that were later used in sickbay when Mitchell attacked Kirk and Spock.

And with that, we’ve ordered Mr. Kelso to get us out of here. Lateral power!

Biographical Information

David Tilotta is a professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC and works in the areas of chemistry and sustainable materials technology. You can email David at david.tilotta@frontier.com. Curt McAloney is an accomplished graphic artist with extensive experience in multimedia, Internet and print design. He resides in a suburb of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, and can be contacted at curt@curtsmedia.com. Together, Curt and David work on startrekhistory.com. Their Star Trek work has appeared in the Star Trek Magazine and Star Trek: The Original Series 365 by Paula M. Block with Terry J. Erdmann.

]]>

Where No Man Has Gone Before” was the second pilot made for Star Trek, and it came about because “The Cage,” the first pilot, failed to sell the series to the NBC network. As we mentioned in last month’s article, the executives at the network realized after viewing “The Cage” that Gene Roddenberry and Desilu Studios could produce mature science fiction, but that the story they told in that first adventure wasn’t what NBC was looking for. Thus, the network took an unusual step and requested another pilot for the series. This time, however, they made it clear to Roddenberry that they wanted a simpler, less erotic action-adventure story and a somewhat different cast.

So, with those marching orders, Roddenberry went to work retooling Star Trek. He fleshed out not only his ideas for a new story concept, but he also invited other writers to pitch theirs. Finally, out of three possibilities (“Where No Man Has Gone Before” by Samuel A. Peeples, “Mudd’s Women” by Stephen Kandel and “The Omega Glory” by Gene Roddenberry), “Where No Man Has Gone Before” was selected by the network to put into production. This story was on the mark, as far as NBC was concerned, because it gave them almost everything they asked for. And, after the network viewed the finished film, they were sold… and so was Star Trek. The Original Series was officially green lit, and that started its historic trek to television.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the television premiere of “Where No Man Has Gone Before,” we thought we’d explore the galactic barrier and present two behind-the-scenes snippets about it.

Mr. Mitchell, we’re leaving the galaxy. Ahead, warp factor one.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Viewing the Galactic Barrier

Most of the viewing displays in “The Cage” – for example the one in the briefing room and the monitors above the bridge stations – were frosted screens that had slides and motion pictures rear projected onto them. Although this approach was tedious and noisy (and expensive, as they had to pay the projector operators), rear projection allowed the actors to see and react in real time to what was displayed. This wasn’t the case, however, for the viewing screens in “Where No Man Has Gone Before” and the rest of the episodes, more or less. For the most part, the active graphics on the viewing screens from the second pilot onwards were separate optical elements that were inserted into them in post-production. This meant, of course, that the actors had to use their craft to imagine what they were not seeing.

As an example of the optical effects work that was used to insert images on the main viewing screen (MVS), here’s a photo sequence from “Where No Man Has Gone Before” that shows how the galactic barrier was placed on it.Star Trek: The Original Series

The large photo on the left in the above collage is from a frame of film showing William Shatner watching the MVS as the scene is slated by John Eckert. The black area in the interior of the screen is the “hole” that’s been added to it in post-production and will be the place where the footage of the barrier display will be added. The upper photo on the right shows a frame from galactic barrier footage that will be inserted into the MVS. According to the script, the galactic barrier was to resemble an aurora borealis, so it was created, in part, by flooding a brightly-lit cloud tank with colored ink/paint and photographing the results. Using the optical printer, the completed footage of the barrier was then matted (masked) to the size of the MVS. Finally, the matted galactic barrier film was rephotographed together with the footage of the MVS with the “hole” in it to complete the effect as shown in the bottom right photo.

Rejected Barrier Effects

When the Enterprise encountered the galactic barrier in the first act, it wreaked havoc on the ship and its crew. On the bridge, we saw electronic panels exploding and Elizabeth Dehner and Gary Mitchell (Gary Lockwood) turning negative as they got shocked with thick, sparking lines. (An example of this latter effect, done in post-production via mattes and animation techniques, is shown below.)

Star Trek: The Original Series

Interestingly, though, this entire sequence originally had different effects that, for unknown reasons, were left on the cutting room floor. Presented below are photos from frames of black and white daily footage that show them, and please note that the captions for the letters in the bottom corners of the pictures can be found after the collage.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Photo A: This first frame comes from before the scene began and shows the cast relaxing before the action started. The technicians in front of the navigation console and on the far right are preparing flash pots (containers holding special pyrotechnic powder) for the soon-to-be-happening explosion and related shower effects.

Photo B: After the director called for action, the bridge was filled with smoke to create the illusion of off-stage fire and a scissor arc lamp was fired to simulate the flash of light for the static electric “lightning bolt” from the barrier. Of course, the lightning bolt striking the bridge panel (denoted by the yellow arrow) was added in post-production and was not seen in the completed and broadcast episode.

Photo C: After being zapped by the barrier lightening, the bridge panel then erupted in a shower of sparks courtesy of a flash pot.

Photo D: Later in this scene, the flash pot on the navigation console was ignited and, simultaneously, Gary Mitchell got hit with several bolts of static electricity that amplified his “Esper” ability (courtesy of optical effects and denoted by the yellow arrows). It’s interesting that the animation effects in this discarded sequence are different from those used in the finished episode (shown earlier) but similar to the ones that were later used in sickbay when Mitchell attacked Kirk and Spock.

And with that, we’ve ordered Mr. Kelso to get us out of here. Lateral power!

Biographical Information

David Tilotta is a professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC and works in the areas of chemistry and sustainable materials technology. You can email David at david.tilotta@frontier.com. Curt McAloney is an accomplished graphic artist with extensive experience in multimedia, Internet and print design. He resides in a suburb of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, and can be contacted at curt@curtsmedia.com. Together, Curt and David work on startrekhistory.com. Their Star Trek work has appeared in the Star Trek Magazine and Star Trek: The Original Series 365 by Paula M. Block with Terry J. Erdmann.

]]>
50-years-later-where-no-man-has-gone-before Thu, 22 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Hallmark's Trek 50th Ornament Ready to Beam Up ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/hallmarks-trek-50th-ornament-ready-to-beam-up

A Star Trek tabletop decoration will be among the more than 130 all-new Keepsake Ornaments set to make their first appearance exclusively at Hallmark Gold Crown stores and online at Hallmark during Hallmark Keepsake Ornament Debut. The eagerly anticipated annual event will be held Oct 1-9.

Hallmark's Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration

Created by Orville Wilson, the new Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration With Light and Sound depicts Kirk sitting in his captain's chair on the bridge, flanked on either side by Spock and Dr. McCoy. The ornament, which also features the Star Trek 50th Anniversary logo, measures 7.4" W by 5.7" H by 4.6" D. Press a button to see the Kirk-Spock-McCoy scene illuminate and to hear dialogue from Star Trek: The Original Series.

The Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration With Light and Sound will be priced at $74.95.

]]>

A Star Trek tabletop decoration will be among the more than 130 all-new Keepsake Ornaments set to make their first appearance exclusively at Hallmark Gold Crown stores and online at Hallmark during Hallmark Keepsake Ornament Debut. The eagerly anticipated annual event will be held Oct 1-9.

Hallmark's Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration

Created by Orville Wilson, the new Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration With Light and Sound depicts Kirk sitting in his captain's chair on the bridge, flanked on either side by Spock and Dr. McCoy. The ornament, which also features the Star Trek 50th Anniversary logo, measures 7.4" W by 5.7" H by 4.6" D. Press a button to see the Kirk-Spock-McCoy scene illuminate and to hear dialogue from Star Trek: The Original Series.

The Star Trek 50th Anniversary To Boldly Go Tabletop Decoration With Light and Sound will be priced at $74.95.

]]>
hallmarks-trek-50th-ornament-ready-to-beam-up Thu, 22 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Catching Up with Alexander Siddig, Part 2]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-alexander-siddig-part-2

That blur you saw may very well have been Alexander Siddig zipping from one project to the next. Really. Siddig, who was known as Siddig El Fadil for much of his run as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, is everywhere. He died a horrendous death as Doran Martell on Game of Thrones, co-stars on Peaky Blinders and just wrapped production on The Kennedys: After Camelot, a miniseries set to air next year. He even co-starred in a series pilot, Recon, that sounded fascinating, but failed to receive a pickup. And, yes, Siddig occasionally finds time in his schedule to appear at a Star Trek convention. In fact, he’s set to touch down in Birmingham, England, next month for Destination Star Trek Europe, which will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. StarTrek.com recently chatted with Siddig about his current projects, DS9 past and appreciation for fans and conventions. Below is part two of our conversation; click HERE to read part one.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir & Cast in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

Post-Deep Space Nine, you have enjoyed a remarkably productive career. Obviously, a lot of it is earned and…

Luck is the right word.

We’ve heard Trek actors say they were typecast. You have done series after series and worked on big movies. How satisfied are you with life post-Star Trek? And how fearful were you when you wrapped DS9 that you would not be in this position as we speak?

Well, I do remember telling someone, and it may have been you, while we were filming Deep Space Nine, in the last couple of years when the writing was on the wall. Someone said, “Very few actors from Star Trek carry on working.” I remember saying that it’s up to me, that everyone can be typecast, but you’ve just got to go out there and show that you’ve got a store with more variety in it than people expect. The lucky thing about it, I think in retrospect, was that I wasn’t really playing an Arab, per se, on Deep Space Nine. He had a kind of vaguely Eastern heritage, but no one really put their finger on anything. He could have been Pakistani, he could have been Indian, he could have been half of those. He could have been Arabic. No one was quite sure. The name was Arabic, but no one really knows the genealogy of names, or etymology of names. So no one really thought of me as an Arab actor, and I got a chance to really be an Arab actor when I left, because obviously horrible things happened in 9/11, and that was just a few years after the show wound to a close.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

The world of entertainment looked around, and they said, “Well we just don’t have many Arab actors who anyone knows apart from Omar Sharif.” So I got work, because producers wanted a familiar-ish face on the screen. There were a couple of jobs I didn’t get because of the fact that I had been on Star Trek, but that was because producers thought Star Trek was corny, and some people were like that back in those days. Nowadays everything is reversed, and nerdy things are hip, and all that macho bulls--it is not hip anymore. So I was extremely lucky; it really was luck. And then I kind of started to forge a career as basically a character actor who did some leads every now and then, which is baffling, but wonderful. So I’ve been doing a really versatile set of roles, from really wildly different things, but different audiences. I’ve spread myself so thin, but there’s not really one demographic that hasn’t seen, or been in the position, to see something that I’ve done, for which I’m really proud and feeling really lucky. I feel really blessed.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

Let’s switch to DS9 and Dr. Bashir. Looking back, what were some of the elements of the character that you most enjoyed exploring?

I think the thing that I was most anxious to impress upon the producers and the public at large was that this was a real boy, this was a real novice adult, and my being in L.A. at that time — he was, in a funny way, an anti-L.A. character. I was looking around L.A., I was going to certain parties. I was never good at parties, even before I went to L.A., and I certainly wasn’t good at them when I went to L.A., but I went to several, because I was young, and it was a crew, and you just float around and do stuff to keep things amusing. Although a lot of these youngsters who I was around, the young cast members from other hit shows, whether it was 90210 or Melrose Place or the beginning of ER at the time, and there was a group of actors who were floating around. I wasn’t impressed by what was happening to them. I thought there was a false projection of importance, and richness. L.A. is very dangerous in that way, because there is an enormous pressure to be wealthy, and to show your wealth. If you don’t look wealthy, then people don’t somehow respect you. You can’t just have a talent, a unique talent, you’ve got to have wealth to prove that your talent is successful, it is marketable, it is usable.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

So… it’s not a town for poets.

It’s a town for beautiful young things, who have translated that beauty into wealth. And there’s something kind of sickening about that, and demoralizing about what the world wants to see, because you don’t just want to see people like that are the only people that do well. So Bashir was a kind of reflection of my idea of what that was, which is “Please don’t be that kind of person. Please be just a normal person who may seem to have the world at his feet, but keeps tripping up as he walks into a room, keeps having trouble.” And when the writers started writing shows where he made huge errors as a doctor and killed lots of people, that was so anti-heroic, and so wrong for television at the time, which then was all self-congratulatory, self-preening and vain. You look at Melrose Place or 90210, these were white people’s problems those kids went through. Baywatch was on, too. That was another thing that was happening at that time. I think maybe just coming to an end, but nevertheless, it was the celebration of beautiful mediocrity that I really didn’t enjoy about it. That was basically the fashion at the time in L.A. Thank goodness the world has changed a lot since.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

I was kicking back against it, and Bashir was actually really unpopular at the beginning because audiences just didn’t know what to make of him. This was not a kid who was beautiful and knew it, and strutted his stuff, and picked up all the girls. He just wasn’t that guy, but that was the fashion. So we had a few difficult years at the beginning, and I remember Rick (Berman), bless his cotton socks, would defend me to the studio for the first two seasons because they were desperate to fire me. And he said, “No, over my dead body. I picked this guy, I’m going to stick with this guy.” And over time, people changed their minds about Bashir, I think. A lot of people, you know, probably not the Trump supporters, which there were those in those days… There is a demographic that would never like someone like Bashir. He’s just not manly enough. But a lot of other people really loved him, really liked what he did. And a lot more humans, fragile humans, that exist everywhere, really identified with him. I still get letters of thanks from people who had a slightly tougher time in life than the ideal American Dream unraveling, which is sort of that myth. People who didn’t see America that way, didn’t feel their lives follow that path. So I got those people.

A lot of gay guys, young gay guys who were clearly vulnerable at that time, because AIDS was sort of at its apotheosis at that time, so they were not comfortable in their own skin. People who weren’t comfortable in their own skin, people who didn’t feel like the quarterback on the team, or the cheerleader, they were the people that really liked Bashir. And since then, obviously, I think society has changed. I think that Deep Space Nine has become more relevant, weirdly, in the years that have ensued, and Bashir has become more accepted.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

If we made you sit and watch three episodes of DS9 with us, which three would you pick? And why?

Really good question. Really difficult to answer because I never remembered the episodes when they came out, and I never watched the show. So elements of this might be influenced by what fans have told me over the years they really liked, and I’m like, “OK, that’s the one I liked too.” I think from a historical point of view, there is one episode that stands out that has nothing particular to do with Deep Space Nine, but it was such an unusual, such a beautiful homage, and that’s “Trials and Tribble-ations.” That has to be on that list because it’s just such a great idea. I think “Our Man Bashir” was probably one of the most important in terms of changing attitudes towards Bashir. I think that was probably one of the most-influential episodes. I don’t know if it’s one of the best, but it is certainly super-influential. I remember opinions began to change after that episode. So that would probably be an important one, historically. And the third episode would probably be “The Quickening.” “Far Beyond the Stars” is wonderful, too. Like I do with rock bands, I change my mind about what my favorite is every couple of weeks, but I just like the premise of “The Quickening.” It’s not on everybody’s top five list, but it’s one of those episodes I think is really important.

Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. Go to www.destinationstartrek.com for details.

]]>

That blur you saw may very well have been Alexander Siddig zipping from one project to the next. Really. Siddig, who was known as Siddig El Fadil for much of his run as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, is everywhere. He died a horrendous death as Doran Martell on Game of Thrones, co-stars on Peaky Blinders and just wrapped production on The Kennedys: After Camelot, a miniseries set to air next year. He even co-starred in a series pilot, Recon, that sounded fascinating, but failed to receive a pickup. And, yes, Siddig occasionally finds time in his schedule to appear at a Star Trek convention. In fact, he’s set to touch down in Birmingham, England, next month for Destination Star Trek Europe, which will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. StarTrek.com recently chatted with Siddig about his current projects, DS9 past and appreciation for fans and conventions. Below is part two of our conversation; click HERE to read part one.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir & Cast in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

Post-Deep Space Nine, you have enjoyed a remarkably productive career. Obviously, a lot of it is earned and…

Luck is the right word.

We’ve heard Trek actors say they were typecast. You have done series after series and worked on big movies. How satisfied are you with life post-Star Trek? And how fearful were you when you wrapped DS9 that you would not be in this position as we speak?

Well, I do remember telling someone, and it may have been you, while we were filming Deep Space Nine, in the last couple of years when the writing was on the wall. Someone said, “Very few actors from Star Trek carry on working.” I remember saying that it’s up to me, that everyone can be typecast, but you’ve just got to go out there and show that you’ve got a store with more variety in it than people expect. The lucky thing about it, I think in retrospect, was that I wasn’t really playing an Arab, per se, on Deep Space Nine. He had a kind of vaguely Eastern heritage, but no one really put their finger on anything. He could have been Pakistani, he could have been Indian, he could have been half of those. He could have been Arabic. No one was quite sure. The name was Arabic, but no one really knows the genealogy of names, or etymology of names. So no one really thought of me as an Arab actor, and I got a chance to really be an Arab actor when I left, because obviously horrible things happened in 9/11, and that was just a few years after the show wound to a close.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

The world of entertainment looked around, and they said, “Well we just don’t have many Arab actors who anyone knows apart from Omar Sharif.” So I got work, because producers wanted a familiar-ish face on the screen. There were a couple of jobs I didn’t get because of the fact that I had been on Star Trek, but that was because producers thought Star Trek was corny, and some people were like that back in those days. Nowadays everything is reversed, and nerdy things are hip, and all that macho bulls--it is not hip anymore. So I was extremely lucky; it really was luck. And then I kind of started to forge a career as basically a character actor who did some leads every now and then, which is baffling, but wonderful. So I’ve been doing a really versatile set of roles, from really wildly different things, but different audiences. I’ve spread myself so thin, but there’s not really one demographic that hasn’t seen, or been in the position, to see something that I’ve done, for which I’m really proud and feeling really lucky. I feel really blessed.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

Let’s switch to DS9 and Dr. Bashir. Looking back, what were some of the elements of the character that you most enjoyed exploring?

I think the thing that I was most anxious to impress upon the producers and the public at large was that this was a real boy, this was a real novice adult, and my being in L.A. at that time — he was, in a funny way, an anti-L.A. character. I was looking around L.A., I was going to certain parties. I was never good at parties, even before I went to L.A., and I certainly wasn’t good at them when I went to L.A., but I went to several, because I was young, and it was a crew, and you just float around and do stuff to keep things amusing. Although a lot of these youngsters who I was around, the young cast members from other hit shows, whether it was 90210 or Melrose Place or the beginning of ER at the time, and there was a group of actors who were floating around. I wasn’t impressed by what was happening to them. I thought there was a false projection of importance, and richness. L.A. is very dangerous in that way, because there is an enormous pressure to be wealthy, and to show your wealth. If you don’t look wealthy, then people don’t somehow respect you. You can’t just have a talent, a unique talent, you’ve got to have wealth to prove that your talent is successful, it is marketable, it is usable.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

So… it’s not a town for poets.

It’s a town for beautiful young things, who have translated that beauty into wealth. And there’s something kind of sickening about that, and demoralizing about what the world wants to see, because you don’t just want to see people like that are the only people that do well. So Bashir was a kind of reflection of my idea of what that was, which is “Please don’t be that kind of person. Please be just a normal person who may seem to have the world at his feet, but keeps tripping up as he walks into a room, keeps having trouble.” And when the writers started writing shows where he made huge errors as a doctor and killed lots of people, that was so anti-heroic, and so wrong for television at the time, which then was all self-congratulatory, self-preening and vain. You look at Melrose Place or 90210, these were white people’s problems those kids went through. Baywatch was on, too. That was another thing that was happening at that time. I think maybe just coming to an end, but nevertheless, it was the celebration of beautiful mediocrity that I really didn’t enjoy about it. That was basically the fashion at the time in L.A. Thank goodness the world has changed a lot since.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

I was kicking back against it, and Bashir was actually really unpopular at the beginning because audiences just didn’t know what to make of him. This was not a kid who was beautiful and knew it, and strutted his stuff, and picked up all the girls. He just wasn’t that guy, but that was the fashion. So we had a few difficult years at the beginning, and I remember Rick (Berman), bless his cotton socks, would defend me to the studio for the first two seasons because they were desperate to fire me. And he said, “No, over my dead body. I picked this guy, I’m going to stick with this guy.” And over time, people changed their minds about Bashir, I think. A lot of people, you know, probably not the Trump supporters, which there were those in those days… There is a demographic that would never like someone like Bashir. He’s just not manly enough. But a lot of other people really loved him, really liked what he did. And a lot more humans, fragile humans, that exist everywhere, really identified with him. I still get letters of thanks from people who had a slightly tougher time in life than the ideal American Dream unraveling, which is sort of that myth. People who didn’t see America that way, didn’t feel their lives follow that path. So I got those people.

A lot of gay guys, young gay guys who were clearly vulnerable at that time, because AIDS was sort of at its apotheosis at that time, so they were not comfortable in their own skin. People who weren’t comfortable in their own skin, people who didn’t feel like the quarterback on the team, or the cheerleader, they were the people that really liked Bashir. And since then, obviously, I think society has changed. I think that Deep Space Nine has become more relevant, weirdly, in the years that have ensued, and Bashir has become more accepted.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir in Star Trek: Deep Space 9

If we made you sit and watch three episodes of DS9 with us, which three would you pick? And why?

Really good question. Really difficult to answer because I never remembered the episodes when they came out, and I never watched the show. So elements of this might be influenced by what fans have told me over the years they really liked, and I’m like, “OK, that’s the one I liked too.” I think from a historical point of view, there is one episode that stands out that has nothing particular to do with Deep Space Nine, but it was such an unusual, such a beautiful homage, and that’s “Trials and Tribble-ations.” That has to be on that list because it’s just such a great idea. I think “Our Man Bashir” was probably one of the most important in terms of changing attitudes towards Bashir. I think that was probably one of the most-influential episodes. I don’t know if it’s one of the best, but it is certainly super-influential. I remember opinions began to change after that episode. So that would probably be an important one, historically. And the third episode would probably be “The Quickening.” “Far Beyond the Stars” is wonderful, too. Like I do with rock bands, I change my mind about what my favorite is every couple of weeks, but I just like the premise of “The Quickening.” It’s not on everybody’s top five list, but it’s one of those episodes I think is really important.

Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. Go to www.destinationstartrek.com for details.

]]>
catching-up-with-alexander-siddig-part-2 Wed, 21 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Beyond Blu-ray Combo Packs Available Nov. 1 ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/beyond-blu-ray-combo-packs-available-nov-1

Star Trek Beyond will blast onto 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and Blu-ray 3D Combo Packs on November 1, with the Digital HD available four weeks early, on October 4. The releases, from Paramount Home Media Distribution, will boast more than an hour of bonus content, with featurettes, deleted scenes, a gag reel and a tribute to both Leonard Nimoy and Anton Yelchin. Fans will also appreciate the film’s Dolby Atmos soundtrack, remixed specifically for the home theater environment to place and move audio anywhere in the room, including overhead.

Specifics of each version include:

Star Trek Beyond Blu-ray Combo Pack

Feature film in high definition, and the following bonus content –

  • Deleted Scenes - Go Beyond the final cut of the movie with scenes you didn't see in theaters.
  • Beyond the Darkness - Meet visionary producer J.J. Abrams, director Justin Lin and co-writers Simon Pegg and Doug Jung as they discuss the inspiration for the Star Trek Beyond storyline and how it came to life.
  • Enterprise Takedown - Experience edge-of-your-seat action and see how a shocking attack destroys the USS Enterprise.
  • Divided and Conquered - Learn how filmmakers pushed the boundaries in Star Trek Beyond by forcing the Enterprise crew into their most challenging situations yet.
  • A Warped Sense of Revenge - Meet Star Trek's newest villain, Krall, as actor Idris Elba reveals the backstory behind his character's terrifying ambitions.
  • Trekking in the Desert - Go on set to Dubai and discover how its futuristic architecture became the foundation for the most innovative Starbase yet.
  • Exploring Strange New Worlds - Tour the incredible production sets of Star Trek Beyond with director Justin Lin.
  • New Life, New Civilizations - See how special effects designers met the challenge to create an unprecedented 50 new alien species for the film to celebrate Star Trek's 50th Anniversary.
  • To Live Long and Prosper - Journey through the past 50 years of Star Trek with J.J. Abrams and the cast as they reflect on the evolution of this iconic sci-fi series.
  • For Leonard and Anton - Watch a touching tribute to the legendary Leonard Nimoy and beloved crew member Anton Yelchin.
  • Gag Reel - Join in on the fun with this hilarious gag reel of on-set bloopers.


DVD

Feature film in Standard Definition

Star Trek Beyond Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack

The Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack includes all of the above, as well as a Blu-ray 3D presented in 1080p high definition with Dolby Atmos. The Blu-ray 3D disc includes the feature film in high definition and 3D. The Combo Pack also includes access to a Digital HD copy of the film.

Star Trek Beyond 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack

Fans can enjoy the ultimate viewing experience with the 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack, which includes the Blu-ray detailed above. The Combo Pack also includes access to a Digital HD copy of the film.

Star Trek Trilogy Blu-ray Collection

The Star Trek Trilogy Blu-ray Collection includes Blu-rays of Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Trek Beyond, along with access to a Digital HD copy of each film.

The Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack and 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack available for purchase include a digital version of the film that can be accessed through UltraViolet, a way to collect, access and enjoy movies. With UltraViolet, consumers can add movies to their digital collection in the cloud, and then stream or download them — reliably and securely — to a variety of devices.

Star Trek Beyond Single-Disc DVD

The single-disc DVD is presented in widescreen enhanced for 16:9 TVs and includes the feature film in standard definition.

Pre-order the combo packs at iTunes and Amazon.

]]>

Star Trek Beyond will blast onto 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and Blu-ray 3D Combo Packs on November 1, with the Digital HD available four weeks early, on October 4. The releases, from Paramount Home Media Distribution, will boast more than an hour of bonus content, with featurettes, deleted scenes, a gag reel and a tribute to both Leonard Nimoy and Anton Yelchin. Fans will also appreciate the film’s Dolby Atmos soundtrack, remixed specifically for the home theater environment to place and move audio anywhere in the room, including overhead.

Specifics of each version include:

Star Trek Beyond Blu-ray Combo Pack

Feature film in high definition, and the following bonus content –

  • Deleted Scenes - Go Beyond the final cut of the movie with scenes you didn't see in theaters.
  • Beyond the Darkness - Meet visionary producer J.J. Abrams, director Justin Lin and co-writers Simon Pegg and Doug Jung as they discuss the inspiration for the Star Trek Beyond storyline and how it came to life.
  • Enterprise Takedown - Experience edge-of-your-seat action and see how a shocking attack destroys the USS Enterprise.
  • Divided and Conquered - Learn how filmmakers pushed the boundaries in Star Trek Beyond by forcing the Enterprise crew into their most challenging situations yet.
  • A Warped Sense of Revenge - Meet Star Trek's newest villain, Krall, as actor Idris Elba reveals the backstory behind his character's terrifying ambitions.
  • Trekking in the Desert - Go on set to Dubai and discover how its futuristic architecture became the foundation for the most innovative Starbase yet.
  • Exploring Strange New Worlds - Tour the incredible production sets of Star Trek Beyond with director Justin Lin.
  • New Life, New Civilizations - See how special effects designers met the challenge to create an unprecedented 50 new alien species for the film to celebrate Star Trek's 50th Anniversary.
  • To Live Long and Prosper - Journey through the past 50 years of Star Trek with J.J. Abrams and the cast as they reflect on the evolution of this iconic sci-fi series.
  • For Leonard and Anton - Watch a touching tribute to the legendary Leonard Nimoy and beloved crew member Anton Yelchin.
  • Gag Reel - Join in on the fun with this hilarious gag reel of on-set bloopers.


DVD

Feature film in Standard Definition

Star Trek Beyond Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack

The Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack includes all of the above, as well as a Blu-ray 3D presented in 1080p high definition with Dolby Atmos. The Blu-ray 3D disc includes the feature film in high definition and 3D. The Combo Pack also includes access to a Digital HD copy of the film.

Star Trek Beyond 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack

Fans can enjoy the ultimate viewing experience with the 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack, which includes the Blu-ray detailed above. The Combo Pack also includes access to a Digital HD copy of the film.

Star Trek Trilogy Blu-ray Collection

The Star Trek Trilogy Blu-ray Collection includes Blu-rays of Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Trek Beyond, along with access to a Digital HD copy of each film.

The Blu-ray Combo Pack, Blu-ray 3D Combo Pack and 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack available for purchase include a digital version of the film that can be accessed through UltraViolet, a way to collect, access and enjoy movies. With UltraViolet, consumers can add movies to their digital collection in the cloud, and then stream or download them — reliably and securely — to a variety of devices.

Star Trek Beyond Single-Disc DVD

The single-disc DVD is presented in widescreen enhanced for 16:9 TVs and includes the feature film in standard definition.

Pre-order the combo packs at iTunes and Amazon.

]]>
beyond-blu-ray-combo-packs-available-nov-1 Wed, 21 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Catching Up with Alexander Siddig, Part 1 ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-alexander-siddig-part-1

That blur you saw may very well have been Alexander Siddig zipping from one project to the next. Really. Siddig, who was known as Siddig El Fadil for much of his run as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, is everywhere. He died a horrendous death as Doran Martell on Game of Thrones, co-stars on Peaky Blinders and just wrapped production on The Kennedys: After Camelot, a miniseries set to air next year. He even co-starred in a series pilot, Recon, that sounded fascinating, but failed to receive a pickup. And, yes, Siddig occasionally finds time in his schedule to appear at a Star Trek convention. In fact, he’s set to touch down in Birmingham, England, next month for Destination Star Trek Europe, which will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. StarTrek.com recently chatted with Siddig about his current projects, DS9 past and appreciation for fans and conventions. Below is part one of our conversation, and visit StarTrek.com again tomorrow to read part two.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Let’s start with two Star Trek questions, then talk about your new roles, and then we’ll come back to Trek again. You still attend the occasional convention, such as the upcoming Destination Star Trek Europe. You’re not like Marina Sirtis, who is the convention queen, but you still go to one or two a year. How do you enjoy getting together with your colleagues, and are you finding a new generation of fans are discovering the show?

A new generation of fans has definitely discovered the show. In this era when we can get whatever we want whenever we want it, Star Trek is one of the perfect shows for that, because it has a longevity that most other shows don’t. Because it’s not based on fashion, no one has flares, so it doesn’t really date as easily as other shows. And people just love the ethos behind Star Trek and what Gene Roddenberry dreamt up. I will go to conventions because A, I really like the fans, I really enjoy hanging out. There are a few fans that I have seen for years and years and years, and I am very comfortable amongst them. I mean, who wouldn’t be? I could cough and they would find that funny and hilarious and anecdotal. But they genuinely are warm. I find that it is the same demographic that it has always been. They were always kids, they were always their grandparents, and they were always moms and dads in those audiences. And it’s the same, but now the kids who were there in the 90’s are the moms and dads.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

It’s amazing, and I hear about fans who have passed away, and we have letters of condolence. We’ve gone through our lives together. People get cancer, all of these things. You just never expect to get this close to people who you don’t really know, but it happens because of conventions, and a website and various other things I’ve got going on. I really like doing the conventions. I don’t have the energy to do lots, and I really believe that if I did more than one or two a year, it wouldn’t be special. So I try and keep myself like the proverbial girl at the party who just says no, the hard-to-get girl.

Let’s pretend that we can arrange for you to play Bashir one more time, for one more episode. What would you want to explore?

Good question. I probably wouldn’t leave the same subject that the show always explored, especially when it came to Julian, and that’s the humanity, the humanness. And it was done in a sci-fi setting. I still love that. I still love the difficult question, the question of “At which point does the means stop justifying the ends?” That’s what I’d want to explore.

Alexander Siddig as Aristotle Onassis in The Kennedys: After Camelot

You just completed work on The Kennedys: After Camelot. What can you tell us about that?

It’s a sequel to a show that was done a couple of years ago with Katie Holmes, playing Jacqueline Kennedy. So this one picks up where that last one left off. Kennedy was assassinated and Bobby Kennedy was about to run as a presidential nominee, and that’s where we start. And they needed an Aristotle Onassis, so I’m playing Aristotle, Ari.

Alexander Siddig as Aristotle Onassis in The Kennedys: After Camelot

What did you want to capture of Onassis? You don’t resemble him in real life, so we’re guessing they’re doing a huge makeup job on you...

That’s absolutely true. I worked with the same production company shooting Tut a couple of years ago, and I was by the pool when the chief publicist on that, who is married to one of the producers, said, ‘What do you think about Aristotle Onassis?’ My first thought was, “You should get Javier Bardem, because I look nothing like him.” Javier just looks much more like my idea of Onassis. I don’t know whether they went to Javier or not, but they came back to me in September of last year and said, “Well, let’s do it. And we’re going to put you in a fat suit, and you’re going to wear some prosthetics.” And that’s exactly what I do. I’ve got this fat suit and prosthetics, and they’ve done quite a remarkable job, I have to say. It’s crazy.

 

Alexander Siddig as Ruben Oliver in Peaky Blinders

And you are also in Peaky Blinders. Give us an introduction to your character, Ruben Oliver. And were you a fan of the show?

I love that show, like so many people. And when I got the opportunity to come in and play this artist, I was like, “Yeah, let’s go. Let’s do it.” So off for a trip to Liverpool, where it was shot, ironically not Birmingham for whatever reason, and I got into the Peaky Blinders. I met all of these guys who have got a group on set. I walked in one day, arriving at work in the green room, and everyone is obviously there talking, except for this tight group that sat in a circle on chairs singing songs. And of course these are all of the actors who are the Peaky Blinders, and it’s amazing. It’s like, they are the Peaky Blinders on set and off set. They go around in a pack. I’m not a Peaky Blinder. I just kept my distance. I wasn’t quite sure what to make of it. Anything could kick off at any moment, so I was like, “Well, I’m going to just watch them.” It was amazing. I get to play Helen McCrory’s love interest, which is groovy, who is this London artist who falls in love with this… the only way I can put it is sort of a Mafioso matriarch. And it promises to be quite interesting, let me put it that way. Helen is a force of nature herself. She’s an incredibly daring actress, so when you do work with her on set she is liable to improvise, and it gets pretty hairy if you don’t hold on tight. You can get blown off the ride. We have a couple of pretty lurid sex scenes, and that was… I just had to let my mind go on vacation, and go wherever she led me, and it was pretty fun. It was pretty good.

IMDB lists Recon as a TV movie. But that was a busted Fox pilot, right?

It was. It was a busted pilot. It happened in Toronto in February or March of this year. So I’m back in Toronto for the second time so far. It was written and produced by this amazing young showrunner called Caroline Dries who wrote Vampire Diaries. It was a terrific idea, really brave, basically about an FBI agent who decides to go undercover, or is sent undercover, more appropriately, to a Muslim family who they believe are terrorist kingpins. And I didn’t get to find out much about it, because you never do when you sign up for a pilot. You see the pilot script, and that is it, unless you are the lead which maybe then they will give you more stuff. But I wasn’t the lead. I was the head of the Muslim family, the patriarch. Sarita Choudhury was in it, and Tracy Spiridakos, I think her name is, a fantastic Greek name, was the lead. We had a tremendously good time, and it’s kind of a brave idea. That’s one of the reasons why I did it, because the five members of the family were to be series regulars, so they were going to be around for a while. I was like, “I’m really intrigued. Where is this going to go? This girl is coming in undercover, says she works as the assistant to my wife on the show, played by Sarita, and they are planning to go with this for several seasons?” I just had to go, “Yeah, OK. I’m curious. I want to know where you’re going to go with this.” Apparently, it tested really well, but I think five brown people, a Muslim family as series regulars… I’m not sure there was a kind of appetite for it. There may be other factors that influenced their decision-making process.

 

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

You had a nice run on Game of Thrones. What was that whole experience like, to shoot a show so far away, to be on a series as popular as that? Obviously, Trek was popular, but with DS9, nobody knew what it was going to be. You arrived at Game of Thrones when it was a full-fledged phenomenon. And, as secretive as Trek could be, Game of Thrones is even more so…

Oh, god, yes. But the whole landscape has changed, and everything is a secret now. Everybody is paranoid about some leak on Facebook or Instagram or YouTube. The internet has changed the landscape since 1992. Pretty much you had a blog with no pictures in 1992, and you couldn’t really get anything exciting on the web. But now you can leak pictures and footage, and people can get the episodes and the scripts and whatnot. So I think the secrecy is kind of understandable, but also there is an element of hype about it that makes it… the more secretive it is, the more special it is. And certainly Game of Thrones plays that. They misinform the crowd and they give them tidbits to send them in wrong directions. So, for example, last season, I believe that the first few episodes were stolen and downloaded online, and everybody got to see them before the show actually aired, and everybody was furious at HBO and whatnot. I don’t know if you remember. I am almost positive that those four episodes were leaked by HBO themselves. So there is an enormous amount of spin going on. I can’t tell you that for sure; that’s just my opinion, but it’s games; everybody’s playing these games.

So I knew this was going to be happening. It kind of started around 2004 from my recollection. Around that time, I was shooting Kingdom of Heaven, and that was the first time I got “Top Secret” on the script, and everybody’s got to be quiet about this, and no one can mention anything about the part and whatnot, and it just spiraled. So Game of Thrones is kind of the king of secrecy and spin and mystery and intrigue, as far as fans are concerned. Because there is such an appetite for gossip, everybody was asking me, “Is Jon Snow dead?” I was like, “I don’t know, he might be.” The only thing that was impossible and difficult was last season when I did it, I knew Jon Snow was dying because I got the scripts. I couldn’t even tell my wife, so it was infuriating. I don’t like walking around with secrets. I can’t stand it. You just make a deal with the devil.

And going on to the show was really quite exciting because it was such a huge thing, and there was so much publicity money. People were saying, “Right, we’re all going to go to South America next week and talk to — let’s get the airline sorted out.” And I’m like, “My goodness, you’re just throwing this dough around, this cash.” So everything was really top-notch, and when we got out on set the crew was spectacularly good. They picked the best crews in the world, and there were two of them. It was so huge. That’s what I remember, everything was so huge. And actors praying they weren’t going to be killed.

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

Our prince did not meet a pleasant end...

He didn’t. It’s funny, I’m not really sure what happened there. I was contracted to do at least four episodes this season, but then I was in L.A. doing publicity for something else, and I got a call at the Chateau Marmont and there were familiar voices on the other end of the phone. It was one of those guys, and because they didn’t introduce themselves it was like, “Hi, it’s me.” I was like, “Is that David or Daniel?” Anyway, they said, “You know what this phone call is about.” I was like, “Yeah, well, I guess I do.” “So we were going to kill you off at the end of last season, but we decided that we’re going to have to kill you off at the beginning of next season.” I was like, “Okay, life goes on.” But there was something wrong about that because I had been contracted for four episodes in the following season, so if they were going to kill me off at the end of the last season why would they contract me for those four episodes? Because it costs them money whether I do them or not, so it’s not great business sense to do it just in case.

So something happened; I have no idea what. There was an enormous amount of fan excitement when I got named to be on the show, and everyone was like, “Oh my god, yes, Doran Martell. He’s going to be great as Doran Martell.” That might have been the kiss of death. Maybe they didn’t want quite that much attention on that character. Maybe they thought, “Well, let’s prove that we’re going to stray from the books. We’re going to do something else, and he will be our first example of that.” So maybe that could have been the case. Or maybe I just screwed up. Maybe I said the wrong thing to the wrong person.

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

Maybe you leaked the episodes?

Maybe I leaked the episodes! People were coming up to me, you can imagine… thousands of people coming up to me in the streets, all over the place, going, “Oh my god, oh my god, it’s Doran Martell. Can I have a photo? What happens next season?” I was like, “Here’s my autograph but tomorrow you’re not going to want it because I’ll be dead, but I can’t tell you.” Anyway, it was one of those things. But I know that, from an actor’s point of view, professionally you don’t want to be on a show like that for too long, unless you are one of the top leads who originated the show, because your schedule gets kind of messed up. You don’t earn as much as you would if you were doing another show, because they’re Game of Thrones, and they don’t have to pay anyone. So it’s kind of a blessing in disguise. I just moved away, and being on it at all sticks, and everyone goes, “Oh, the guy from Game of Thrones!” It doesn’t really matter that you weren’t on it very long.

 

Visit StarTrek.com again tomorrow to read part two of our interview with Alexander Siddig. Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. Go to www.destinationstartrek.com for details.

]]>

That blur you saw may very well have been Alexander Siddig zipping from one project to the next. Really. Siddig, who was known as Siddig El Fadil for much of his run as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, is everywhere. He died a horrendous death as Doran Martell on Game of Thrones, co-stars on Peaky Blinders and just wrapped production on The Kennedys: After Camelot, a miniseries set to air next year. He even co-starred in a series pilot, Recon, that sounded fascinating, but failed to receive a pickup. And, yes, Siddig occasionally finds time in his schedule to appear at a Star Trek convention. In fact, he’s set to touch down in Birmingham, England, next month for Destination Star Trek Europe, which will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. StarTrek.com recently chatted with Siddig about his current projects, DS9 past and appreciation for fans and conventions. Below is part one of our conversation, and visit StarTrek.com again tomorrow to read part two.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Let’s start with two Star Trek questions, then talk about your new roles, and then we’ll come back to Trek again. You still attend the occasional convention, such as the upcoming Destination Star Trek Europe. You’re not like Marina Sirtis, who is the convention queen, but you still go to one or two a year. How do you enjoy getting together with your colleagues, and are you finding a new generation of fans are discovering the show?

A new generation of fans has definitely discovered the show. In this era when we can get whatever we want whenever we want it, Star Trek is one of the perfect shows for that, because it has a longevity that most other shows don’t. Because it’s not based on fashion, no one has flares, so it doesn’t really date as easily as other shows. And people just love the ethos behind Star Trek and what Gene Roddenberry dreamt up. I will go to conventions because A, I really like the fans, I really enjoy hanging out. There are a few fans that I have seen for years and years and years, and I am very comfortable amongst them. I mean, who wouldn’t be? I could cough and they would find that funny and hilarious and anecdotal. But they genuinely are warm. I find that it is the same demographic that it has always been. They were always kids, they were always their grandparents, and they were always moms and dads in those audiences. And it’s the same, but now the kids who were there in the 90’s are the moms and dads.

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Julian Bashir on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

It’s amazing, and I hear about fans who have passed away, and we have letters of condolence. We’ve gone through our lives together. People get cancer, all of these things. You just never expect to get this close to people who you don’t really know, but it happens because of conventions, and a website and various other things I’ve got going on. I really like doing the conventions. I don’t have the energy to do lots, and I really believe that if I did more than one or two a year, it wouldn’t be special. So I try and keep myself like the proverbial girl at the party who just says no, the hard-to-get girl.

Let’s pretend that we can arrange for you to play Bashir one more time, for one more episode. What would you want to explore?

Good question. I probably wouldn’t leave the same subject that the show always explored, especially when it came to Julian, and that’s the humanity, the humanness. And it was done in a sci-fi setting. I still love that. I still love the difficult question, the question of “At which point does the means stop justifying the ends?” That’s what I’d want to explore.

Alexander Siddig as Aristotle Onassis in The Kennedys: After Camelot

You just completed work on The Kennedys: After Camelot. What can you tell us about that?

It’s a sequel to a show that was done a couple of years ago with Katie Holmes, playing Jacqueline Kennedy. So this one picks up where that last one left off. Kennedy was assassinated and Bobby Kennedy was about to run as a presidential nominee, and that’s where we start. And they needed an Aristotle Onassis, so I’m playing Aristotle, Ari.

Alexander Siddig as Aristotle Onassis in The Kennedys: After Camelot

What did you want to capture of Onassis? You don’t resemble him in real life, so we’re guessing they’re doing a huge makeup job on you...

That’s absolutely true. I worked with the same production company shooting Tut a couple of years ago, and I was by the pool when the chief publicist on that, who is married to one of the producers, said, ‘What do you think about Aristotle Onassis?’ My first thought was, “You should get Javier Bardem, because I look nothing like him.” Javier just looks much more like my idea of Onassis. I don’t know whether they went to Javier or not, but they came back to me in September of last year and said, “Well, let’s do it. And we’re going to put you in a fat suit, and you’re going to wear some prosthetics.” And that’s exactly what I do. I’ve got this fat suit and prosthetics, and they’ve done quite a remarkable job, I have to say. It’s crazy.

 

Alexander Siddig as Ruben Oliver in Peaky Blinders

And you are also in Peaky Blinders. Give us an introduction to your character, Ruben Oliver. And were you a fan of the show?

I love that show, like so many people. And when I got the opportunity to come in and play this artist, I was like, “Yeah, let’s go. Let’s do it.” So off for a trip to Liverpool, where it was shot, ironically not Birmingham for whatever reason, and I got into the Peaky Blinders. I met all of these guys who have got a group on set. I walked in one day, arriving at work in the green room, and everyone is obviously there talking, except for this tight group that sat in a circle on chairs singing songs. And of course these are all of the actors who are the Peaky Blinders, and it’s amazing. It’s like, they are the Peaky Blinders on set and off set. They go around in a pack. I’m not a Peaky Blinder. I just kept my distance. I wasn’t quite sure what to make of it. Anything could kick off at any moment, so I was like, “Well, I’m going to just watch them.” It was amazing. I get to play Helen McCrory’s love interest, which is groovy, who is this London artist who falls in love with this… the only way I can put it is sort of a Mafioso matriarch. And it promises to be quite interesting, let me put it that way. Helen is a force of nature herself. She’s an incredibly daring actress, so when you do work with her on set she is liable to improvise, and it gets pretty hairy if you don’t hold on tight. You can get blown off the ride. We have a couple of pretty lurid sex scenes, and that was… I just had to let my mind go on vacation, and go wherever she led me, and it was pretty fun. It was pretty good.

IMDB lists Recon as a TV movie. But that was a busted Fox pilot, right?

It was. It was a busted pilot. It happened in Toronto in February or March of this year. So I’m back in Toronto for the second time so far. It was written and produced by this amazing young showrunner called Caroline Dries who wrote Vampire Diaries. It was a terrific idea, really brave, basically about an FBI agent who decides to go undercover, or is sent undercover, more appropriately, to a Muslim family who they believe are terrorist kingpins. And I didn’t get to find out much about it, because you never do when you sign up for a pilot. You see the pilot script, and that is it, unless you are the lead which maybe then they will give you more stuff. But I wasn’t the lead. I was the head of the Muslim family, the patriarch. Sarita Choudhury was in it, and Tracy Spiridakos, I think her name is, a fantastic Greek name, was the lead. We had a tremendously good time, and it’s kind of a brave idea. That’s one of the reasons why I did it, because the five members of the family were to be series regulars, so they were going to be around for a while. I was like, “I’m really intrigued. Where is this going to go? This girl is coming in undercover, says she works as the assistant to my wife on the show, played by Sarita, and they are planning to go with this for several seasons?” I just had to go, “Yeah, OK. I’m curious. I want to know where you’re going to go with this.” Apparently, it tested really well, but I think five brown people, a Muslim family as series regulars… I’m not sure there was a kind of appetite for it. There may be other factors that influenced their decision-making process.

 

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

You had a nice run on Game of Thrones. What was that whole experience like, to shoot a show so far away, to be on a series as popular as that? Obviously, Trek was popular, but with DS9, nobody knew what it was going to be. You arrived at Game of Thrones when it was a full-fledged phenomenon. And, as secretive as Trek could be, Game of Thrones is even more so…

Oh, god, yes. But the whole landscape has changed, and everything is a secret now. Everybody is paranoid about some leak on Facebook or Instagram or YouTube. The internet has changed the landscape since 1992. Pretty much you had a blog with no pictures in 1992, and you couldn’t really get anything exciting on the web. But now you can leak pictures and footage, and people can get the episodes and the scripts and whatnot. So I think the secrecy is kind of understandable, but also there is an element of hype about it that makes it… the more secretive it is, the more special it is. And certainly Game of Thrones plays that. They misinform the crowd and they give them tidbits to send them in wrong directions. So, for example, last season, I believe that the first few episodes were stolen and downloaded online, and everybody got to see them before the show actually aired, and everybody was furious at HBO and whatnot. I don’t know if you remember. I am almost positive that those four episodes were leaked by HBO themselves. So there is an enormous amount of spin going on. I can’t tell you that for sure; that’s just my opinion, but it’s games; everybody’s playing these games.

So I knew this was going to be happening. It kind of started around 2004 from my recollection. Around that time, I was shooting Kingdom of Heaven, and that was the first time I got “Top Secret” on the script, and everybody’s got to be quiet about this, and no one can mention anything about the part and whatnot, and it just spiraled. So Game of Thrones is kind of the king of secrecy and spin and mystery and intrigue, as far as fans are concerned. Because there is such an appetite for gossip, everybody was asking me, “Is Jon Snow dead?” I was like, “I don’t know, he might be.” The only thing that was impossible and difficult was last season when I did it, I knew Jon Snow was dying because I got the scripts. I couldn’t even tell my wife, so it was infuriating. I don’t like walking around with secrets. I can’t stand it. You just make a deal with the devil.

And going on to the show was really quite exciting because it was such a huge thing, and there was so much publicity money. People were saying, “Right, we’re all going to go to South America next week and talk to — let’s get the airline sorted out.” And I’m like, “My goodness, you’re just throwing this dough around, this cash.” So everything was really top-notch, and when we got out on set the crew was spectacularly good. They picked the best crews in the world, and there were two of them. It was so huge. That’s what I remember, everything was so huge. And actors praying they weren’t going to be killed.

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

Our prince did not meet a pleasant end...

He didn’t. It’s funny, I’m not really sure what happened there. I was contracted to do at least four episodes this season, but then I was in L.A. doing publicity for something else, and I got a call at the Chateau Marmont and there were familiar voices on the other end of the phone. It was one of those guys, and because they didn’t introduce themselves it was like, “Hi, it’s me.” I was like, “Is that David or Daniel?” Anyway, they said, “You know what this phone call is about.” I was like, “Yeah, well, I guess I do.” “So we were going to kill you off at the end of last season, but we decided that we’re going to have to kill you off at the beginning of next season.” I was like, “Okay, life goes on.” But there was something wrong about that because I had been contracted for four episodes in the following season, so if they were going to kill me off at the end of the last season why would they contract me for those four episodes? Because it costs them money whether I do them or not, so it’s not great business sense to do it just in case.

So something happened; I have no idea what. There was an enormous amount of fan excitement when I got named to be on the show, and everyone was like, “Oh my god, yes, Doran Martell. He’s going to be great as Doran Martell.” That might have been the kiss of death. Maybe they didn’t want quite that much attention on that character. Maybe they thought, “Well, let’s prove that we’re going to stray from the books. We’re going to do something else, and he will be our first example of that.” So maybe that could have been the case. Or maybe I just screwed up. Maybe I said the wrong thing to the wrong person.

Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell in Game of Thrones

Maybe you leaked the episodes?

Maybe I leaked the episodes! People were coming up to me, you can imagine… thousands of people coming up to me in the streets, all over the place, going, “Oh my god, oh my god, it’s Doran Martell. Can I have a photo? What happens next season?” I was like, “Here’s my autograph but tomorrow you’re not going to want it because I’ll be dead, but I can’t tell you.” Anyway, it was one of those things. But I know that, from an actor’s point of view, professionally you don’t want to be on a show like that for too long, unless you are one of the top leads who originated the show, because your schedule gets kind of messed up. You don’t earn as much as you would if you were doing another show, because they’re Game of Thrones, and they don’t have to pay anyone. So it’s kind of a blessing in disguise. I just moved away, and being on it at all sticks, and everyone goes, “Oh, the guy from Game of Thrones!” It doesn’t really matter that you weren’t on it very long.

 

Visit StarTrek.com again tomorrow to read part two of our interview with Alexander Siddig. Destination Star Trek Europe will be held October 7-9 at the NEC Birmingham. Go to www.destinationstartrek.com for details.

]]>
catching-up-with-alexander-siddig-part-1 Tue, 20 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[IDW Readies Trek Comics for December ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/idw-readies-trek-comics-for-december

The holidays are still a few months away, but IDW Publishing already has their eye on December. And they've given StarTrek.com an exclusive First Look at their Star Trek comic book adventures set for release that month. First up is Star Trek: Boldly Go #3, written by Mike Johnson, with art by Tony Shasteen and a George Caltsoudas cover. Boldly Go #3 will continue the popular new ongoing Trek series, as Captain Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Endeavour face an enemy unlike any they've faced before... an enemy all-too-familiar to Trek fans. Boldly Go #3 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. The subscription variant will feature a Shasteen cover, while Marc Laming is handling another variant cover.

Star Trek Comic Boldly Go #3

Star Trek Comic Boldly Go #3

Then there's Star Trek New Visions Special: The Hidden Face, with John Byrne writing the tale and doing the photo-manipulation honors. The story finds the Enterprise crew experiencing a chance encounter with a drifting ship, which leads to a world where the most obscene thing imaginable is... the human face. And so Captain Kirk must face the greatest test of his belief in the Prime Directive. The Hidden Face will run 52 pages and cost $7.99.

Star Trek New Visions

Up next is Star Trek: New Visions, Vol. 4, written by John Byrne, with Byrne providing the inside art and cover as well. Vol. 4 will present all-new, feature-length stories set in the Star Trek: The Original Series universe, done in Byrne's unique, one-of-a-kind photomontage style. In “Mister Chekov,” find out what roles the navigator played aboard the Enterprise before his promotion to the starboard seat; in “Of Woman Born,” Dr. McCoy confronts Captain Kirk with a staggering discovery: Lt. Carolyn Palamas is pregnant with the child of Apollo. Or is she? And in “Swarm,” an alien threat that numbers in the millions appears and star systems are already dying. What can the crew of the Enterprise do – alone? Vol. 4 will run 128 pages and cost $19.99.

Star Trek New Visions Comic Cover

And, last but not least, December will bring with it Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1 (of 6). Written by Mike Johnson, with the art and cover by Angel Hernandez, the galaxy-spanning crossover epic will continue in this sequel to the blockbuster Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War saga. In it, Captain Kirk and Hal Jordan lead the combined might of Starfleet and the Lantern Corps on an all-new adventure against new foes from both franchises. Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. The subscription variant will offer a Rachael Stott cover, and fans should also be on the lookout for a Blank Sketch Variant.

Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1

Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>

The holidays are still a few months away, but IDW Publishing already has their eye on December. And they've given StarTrek.com an exclusive First Look at their Star Trek comic book adventures set for release that month. First up is Star Trek: Boldly Go #3, written by Mike Johnson, with art by Tony Shasteen and a George Caltsoudas cover. Boldly Go #3 will continue the popular new ongoing Trek series, as Captain Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Endeavour face an enemy unlike any they've faced before... an enemy all-too-familiar to Trek fans. Boldly Go #3 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. The subscription variant will feature a Shasteen cover, while Marc Laming is handling another variant cover.

Star Trek Comic Boldly Go #3

Star Trek Comic Boldly Go #3

Then there's Star Trek New Visions Special: The Hidden Face, with John Byrne writing the tale and doing the photo-manipulation honors. The story finds the Enterprise crew experiencing a chance encounter with a drifting ship, which leads to a world where the most obscene thing imaginable is... the human face. And so Captain Kirk must face the greatest test of his belief in the Prime Directive. The Hidden Face will run 52 pages and cost $7.99.

Star Trek New Visions

Up next is Star Trek: New Visions, Vol. 4, written by John Byrne, with Byrne providing the inside art and cover as well. Vol. 4 will present all-new, feature-length stories set in the Star Trek: The Original Series universe, done in Byrne's unique, one-of-a-kind photomontage style. In “Mister Chekov,” find out what roles the navigator played aboard the Enterprise before his promotion to the starboard seat; in “Of Woman Born,” Dr. McCoy confronts Captain Kirk with a staggering discovery: Lt. Carolyn Palamas is pregnant with the child of Apollo. Or is she? And in “Swarm,” an alien threat that numbers in the millions appears and star systems are already dying. What can the crew of the Enterprise do – alone? Vol. 4 will run 128 pages and cost $19.99.

Star Trek New Visions Comic Cover

And, last but not least, December will bring with it Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1 (of 6). Written by Mike Johnson, with the art and cover by Angel Hernandez, the galaxy-spanning crossover epic will continue in this sequel to the blockbuster Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War saga. In it, Captain Kirk and Hal Jordan lead the combined might of Starfleet and the Lantern Corps on an all-new adventure against new foes from both franchises. Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. The subscription variant will offer a Rachael Stott cover, and fans should also be on the lookout for a Blank Sketch Variant.

Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1

Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol. 2 #1

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>
idw-readies-trek-comics-for-december Tue, 20 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Revised & Expanded Trek Encyclopedia Out Oct. 18]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/revised-expanded-trek-encyclopedia-out-oct-18

The Star Trek Encyclopedia: A Reference Guide to the Future, which has long been the go-to source for everything related to the Star Trek canon, has been revised and expanded for the first time since its initial release in 1999. Due out on October 18 from Harper Collins, the updated The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda, will include a fully new design, illustrations and exhaustively researched and detailed entries on the ships, characters and events from the most recent 17 years of Star Trek television shows and movies. That's to say that across its 1,056 pages, 300 of which will feature new entries, the updated Encyclopedia will now also cover Star Trek: Voyager seasons 4-7, Star Trek: Enterprise seasons 1-4 and Star Trek Nemesis, as well as recent J.J. Abrams big-screen adventures Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness.

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition will be released in an authoratative two-volume hardcover edition that will come with a deluxe slipcase. It will sell for will sell for $150. Go to www.harpercollins.com to pre-order the book.

]]>

The Star Trek Encyclopedia: A Reference Guide to the Future, which has long been the go-to source for everything related to the Star Trek canon, has been revised and expanded for the first time since its initial release in 1999. Due out on October 18 from Harper Collins, the updated The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda, will include a fully new design, illustrations and exhaustively researched and detailed entries on the ships, characters and events from the most recent 17 years of Star Trek television shows and movies. That's to say that across its 1,056 pages, 300 of which will feature new entries, the updated Encyclopedia will now also cover Star Trek: Voyager seasons 4-7, Star Trek: Enterprise seasons 1-4 and Star Trek Nemesis, as well as recent J.J. Abrams big-screen adventures Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness.

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition, by Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda

The Star Trek Encyclopedia Revised and Expanded Edition will be released in an authoratative two-volume hardcover edition that will come with a deluxe slipcase. It will sell for will sell for $150. Go to www.harpercollins.com to pre-order the book.

]]>
revised-expanded-trek-encyclopedia-out-oct-18 Mon, 19 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Byrne's "Swarm" Out on Wednesday from IDW]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/byrnes-swarm-out-on-wednesday-from-idw

The latest photo-manipulation comic book creation by John Byrne is Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm. IDW Publishing will release it on Wednesday, and StarTrek.com is pleased to share an exclusive preview of art from the title. The story centers on an alien threat that numbers in the millions, and star systems are already dying. What can the crew of the Enterprise do -- alone, to save the day? Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm will run 52 pages and cost $7.99.

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: SwarmStar Trek: New Visions Special: SwarmStar Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>

The latest photo-manipulation comic book creation by John Byrne is Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm. IDW Publishing will release it on Wednesday, and StarTrek.com is pleased to share an exclusive preview of art from the title. The story centers on an alien threat that numbers in the millions, and star systems are already dying. What can the crew of the Enterprise do -- alone, to save the day? Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm will run 52 pages and cost $7.99.

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: SwarmStar Trek: New Visions Special: SwarmStar Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

Star Trek: New Visions Special: Swarm

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>
byrnes-swarm-out-on-wednesday-from-idw Sun, 18 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Poll Says Best Trek Movie Is... ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/poll-says-best-trek-movie-is

What is the best Star Trek movie? That's the question we asked for our latest StarTrek.com poll. The reply options included The Motion Picture, The Wrath of Khan, Generations, Star Trek (2009) and Beyond. More than 4,000 fans participated -- and, yes, more than a few of you took us to task for not including First Contact or The Voyage Home as options -- and here are the results:

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

The Wrath of Khan (65%)

Star Trek: Generations

Generations (11%)

Star Trek Beyond

Beyond (10%)

Star Trek (2009)

Star Trek (2009) (8%)

Star Trek: The Motion Picture

The Motion Picture (5%)

And how did you choice do in the results?

]]>

What is the best Star Trek movie? That's the question we asked for our latest StarTrek.com poll. The reply options included The Motion Picture, The Wrath of Khan, Generations, Star Trek (2009) and Beyond. More than 4,000 fans participated -- and, yes, more than a few of you took us to task for not including First Contact or The Voyage Home as options -- and here are the results:

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

The Wrath of Khan (65%)

Star Trek: Generations

Generations (11%)

Star Trek Beyond

Beyond (10%)

Star Trek (2009)

Star Trek (2009) (8%)

Star Trek: The Motion Picture

The Motion Picture (5%)

And how did you choice do in the results?

]]>
poll-says-best-trek-movie-is Sun, 18 Sep 2016 05:52:46 -0700
<![CDATA[What Do Trek & Canadian Space Agency Have in Common? ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/what-do-trek-canadian-space-agency-have-in-common

Star Trek is a worldwide sensation. Some people are die-hard fans while others can quote it without having ever watched it. From the very first episode on September 8, 1966 -- a time when technology was developing rapidly and society was opening its doors to the rest of the world -- the trailblazing series featured teleportation machines, wireless communications and a multicultural universe.

The space-based saga's 50th anniversary is an opportunity to reflect on some of the similarities between Star Trek and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).

Cutting-Edge Medical Equipment

When Enterprise crew members became sick, Dr. McCoy was able to diagnose the problem in record time, using his medical tricorder.

MicroFlow could pave the way for just such a gadget. Tested by the CSA on the International Space Station in 2013, this miniaturized version of a flow cytometer (a common research or clinical laboratory instrument used for a range of bioanalysis and clinical diagnoses) can spot cells and biological molecules rapidly by using fibre-optic technology.

MicroFlow could revolutionize how astronauts areable to diagnose and treat themselves and others throughout long-duration missions by allowing the crew to test for medical conditions without having to send samples back to Earth for analysis.

Star Trek's Dr. McCoy diagnoses a patient using his medical tricorder. 

CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield unpacks the Canadian experiment Microflow, a blood and bio-fluid sample analysis tool. (Credits: NASA, CSA)

Global Positioning System Devices

The Enterprise's transporter was able to pinpoint the location of an individual crew member from thousands of miles away. Although we're still working on teleportation, we've made tremendous progress when it comes to location technology.

The Canadian Maritime Monitoring and Messaging Microsatellite (M3MSat), launched on June 21, 2016, will help improve Canada's space-based capabilities to detect ships and manage marine traffic.

In Star Trek, the Enterprise's transporter pinpoints the location of crew members from thousands of miles away.

The Canadian M3MSat. (Credit: CSA)

Space Exploration Sensors

Whenever Spock beamed down to a planetary surface, he always took his trusty tricorder with him. This handy pocket-sized device could do things like analyze the minerals in soil and look for signs of life.

Curiosity, the centrepiece of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, is equipped with 10 different instruments, including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), developed and funded by the CSA. This instrument was designed to measure the abundance of chemical elements in rocks and soils. Compiling the data from all the instruments will help scientists determine whether Mars was once more hospitable to life. 

Canada is contributing an instrument known as the OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA) to NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission. OLA will scan and measure the entire surface of the asteroid to create a highly accurate 3D model, and provide mission scientists with unprecedented information on the asteroid's shape, topography, distribution of boulders, rocks and other surface features.

Spock uses his tricorder to analyze the minerals in soil and to look for signs of life.

The OLA contributed by Canada to NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission. (Credit: NASA)

New Surgical Techniques

In Star Trek, "focused ultrasound surgery" is a non-invasive surgical technique to destroy unwanted masses within the body without harming the surrounding tissues. Decades ago, Star Trek character Dr. McCoy touted the advantages of doing surgery without using knives. On one occasion, he saved Chekov with a nifty little non-invasive surgical device.

NeuroArm, KidsArm and the Image-Guided Autonomous Robot (IGAR) are medical and surgical projects and instruments directly inspired by the Canadian space technology behind the Canadarm, Canadarm2 and Dextre.

NeuroArm is the world's first robot capable of performing surgery inside magnetic resonance machines.

KidsArm is the first image-guided robotic surgical arm in the world specifically designed for pediatric surgery. It is currently being tested at SickKids Hospital (Toronto). The robot is also promising for fetal, cardiac, neurological and urological surgeries.

IGAR is expected to bring increased access, precision and dexterity to breast cancer treatment, resulting in highly accurate and minimally invasive procedures.

Star Trek character Dr. McCoy uses "focuses ultrasound surgery."

KidsArm is the first image-guided robotic surgical arm in the world specifically designedfor pediatric surgery. (Credit: CSA)

To learn more about the Canadian Space Agency, check out their Facebook Page.

]]>

Star Trek is a worldwide sensation. Some people are die-hard fans while others can quote it without having ever watched it. From the very first episode on September 8, 1966 -- a time when technology was developing rapidly and society was opening its doors to the rest of the world -- the trailblazing series featured teleportation machines, wireless communications and a multicultural universe.

The space-based saga's 50th anniversary is an opportunity to reflect on some of the similarities between Star Trek and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).

Cutting-Edge Medical Equipment

When Enterprise crew members became sick, Dr. McCoy was able to diagnose the problem in record time, using his medical tricorder.

MicroFlow could pave the way for just such a gadget. Tested by the CSA on the International Space Station in 2013, this miniaturized version of a flow cytometer (a common research or clinical laboratory instrument used for a range of bioanalysis and clinical diagnoses) can spot cells and biological molecules rapidly by using fibre-optic technology.

MicroFlow could revolutionize how astronauts areable to diagnose and treat themselves and others throughout long-duration missions by allowing the crew to test for medical conditions without having to send samples back to Earth for analysis.

Star Trek's Dr. McCoy diagnoses a patient using his medical tricorder. 

CSA Astronaut Chris Hadfield unpacks the Canadian experiment Microflow, a blood and bio-fluid sample analysis tool. (Credits: NASA, CSA)

Global Positioning System Devices

The Enterprise's transporter was able to pinpoint the location of an individual crew member from thousands of miles away. Although we're still working on teleportation, we've made tremendous progress when it comes to location technology.

The Canadian Maritime Monitoring and Messaging Microsatellite (M3MSat), launched on June 21, 2016, will help improve Canada's space-based capabilities to detect ships and manage marine traffic.

In Star Trek, the Enterprise's transporter pinpoints the location of crew members from thousands of miles away.

The Canadian M3MSat. (Credit: CSA)

Space Exploration Sensors

Whenever Spock beamed down to a planetary surface, he always took his trusty tricorder with him. This handy pocket-sized device could do things like analyze the minerals in soil and look for signs of life.

Curiosity, the centrepiece of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, is equipped with 10 different instruments, including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), developed and funded by the CSA. This instrument was designed to measure the abundance of chemical elements in rocks and soils. Compiling the data from all the instruments will help scientists determine whether Mars was once more hospitable to life. 

Canada is contributing an instrument known as the OSIRIS-REx Laser Altimeter (OLA) to NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission. OLA will scan and measure the entire surface of the asteroid to create a highly accurate 3D model, and provide mission scientists with unprecedented information on the asteroid's shape, topography, distribution of boulders, rocks and other surface features.

Spock uses his tricorder to analyze the minerals in soil and to look for signs of life.

The OLA contributed by Canada to NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission. (Credit: NASA)

New Surgical Techniques

In Star Trek, "focused ultrasound surgery" is a non-invasive surgical technique to destroy unwanted masses within the body without harming the surrounding tissues. Decades ago, Star Trek character Dr. McCoy touted the advantages of doing surgery without using knives. On one occasion, he saved Chekov with a nifty little non-invasive surgical device.

NeuroArm, KidsArm and the Image-Guided Autonomous Robot (IGAR) are medical and surgical projects and instruments directly inspired by the Canadian space technology behind the Canadarm, Canadarm2 and Dextre.

NeuroArm is the world's first robot capable of performing surgery inside magnetic resonance machines.

KidsArm is the first image-guided robotic surgical arm in the world specifically designed for pediatric surgery. It is currently being tested at SickKids Hospital (Toronto). The robot is also promising for fetal, cardiac, neurological and urological surgeries.

IGAR is expected to bring increased access, precision and dexterity to breast cancer treatment, resulting in highly accurate and minimally invasive procedures.

Star Trek character Dr. McCoy uses "focuses ultrasound surgery."

KidsArm is the first image-guided robotic surgical arm in the world specifically designedfor pediatric surgery. (Credit: CSA)

To learn more about the Canadian Space Agency, check out their Facebook Page.

]]>
what-do-trek-canadian-space-agency-have-in-common Sat, 17 Sep 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[40 Years Later -- The Legacy of the Space Shuttle Enterprise ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/40-years-later-the-legacy-of-the-space-shuttle-enterprise

Where were you on September 17, 1976? That's the date that NASA rolled out the Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101), at the Rockwell plant in Palmdale, California, with Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry and most of The Original Series cast -- including Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Nichelle Nichols, James Doohan and Walter Koenig -- joining the festivities at the dedication ceremony. The Enterprise, of course, was a shuttle prototype named after Trek's U.S.S. Enterprise, and it earned its name following a write-in campaign, early proof that Star Trek -- and Star Trek's science -- was not only on its way back into the public conversation, but that it had -- as it still does today -- greatly influenced scientists and astronauts.

Gene Roddenberry and Star Trek: TOS Cast at Space Shuttle Enterprise Rollout

The Enterprise shuttle never actually flew in space on its own, but NASA used it perform atmospheric test flights -- which it did upon being launched from a modified 747 airplane. NASA retired the Enterprise in the early 1980s and eventually ended up at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Later, in 2012, the Enterprise made one last trip, a fly-by (on the back of a plane, of course) over New York City, on its way to becoming a permanent fixture at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. And on July 12, 2012, the Intrepid played host to a ribbon-cutting ceremony and public opening of the Space Shuttle Pavilion. Numerous dignitaries attended, including NASA astronauts Mario Runco Jr., Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Kevin R. Gregel, Ellen S. Baker, Charles J. Camarda, Michael J. Massimino, Karol J. Bobko and Lee M.E. Morin; NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr.; local politicians, event sponsors; and a contingent of surviving crewmen who served aboard the Intrepid during its years as an aircraft carrier.

NASA's Star Trek Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101)

That same day, StarTrek.com talked for a few moments with Leonard Nimoy, who been on hand in April, 2012, when the Enterprise arrived in New York, before it made its final trek to the Intrepid. “It was an emotional and proud experience for me to be associated with this project,” Nimoy said. “The shuttle was a leap forward in moving people and equipment into space. I remember the day it was rolled out of its hangar in California and the Air Force band played the theme from Star Trek. It was thrilling. I’m so happy that it's found a home.”

Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101) at the Intrepid Musem

Fans attending current interactive exhibition Star Trek: The Starfleet Academy Experience at the Intrepid should also check out the Enteprise. For more information on The Starfleet Academy Experience, including VIP ticket packages and other programming at the Museum please visit www.intrepidmuseum.org/Startrek.

]]>

Where were you on September 17, 1976? That's the date that NASA rolled out the Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101), at the Rockwell plant in Palmdale, California, with Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry and most of The Original Series cast -- including Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Nichelle Nichols, James Doohan and Walter Koenig -- joining the festivities at the dedication ceremony. The Enterprise, of course, was a shuttle prototype named after Trek's U.S.S. Enterprise, and it earned its name following a write-in campaign, early proof that Star Trek -- and Star Trek's science -- was not only on its way back into the public conversation, but that it had -- as it still does today -- greatly influenced scientists and astronauts.

Gene Roddenberry and Star Trek: TOS Cast at Space Shuttle Enterprise Rollout

The Enterprise shuttle never actually flew in space on its own, but NASA used it perform atmospheric test flights -- which it did upon being launched from a modified 747 airplane. NASA retired the Enterprise in the early 1980s and eventually ended up at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Later, in 2012, the Enterprise made one last trip, a fly-by (on the back of a plane, of course) over New York City, on its way to becoming a permanent fixture at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. And on July 12, 2012, the Intrepid played host to a ribbon-cutting ceremony and public opening of the Space Shuttle Pavilion. Numerous dignitaries attended, including NASA astronauts Mario Runco Jr., Jeffrey A. Hoffman, Kevin R. Gregel, Ellen S. Baker, Charles J. Camarda, Michael J. Massimino, Karol J. Bobko and Lee M.E. Morin; NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden Jr.; local politicians, event sponsors; and a contingent of surviving crewmen who served aboard the Intrepid during its years as an aircraft carrier.

NASA's Star Trek Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101)

That same day, StarTrek.com talked for a few moments with Leonard Nimoy, who been on hand in April, 2012, when the Enterprise arrived in New York, before it made its final trek to the Intrepid. “It was an emotional and proud experience for me to be associated with this project,” Nimoy said. “The shuttle was a leap forward in moving people and equipment into space. I remember the day it was rolled out of its hangar in California and the Air Force band played the theme from Star Trek. It was thrilling. I’m so happy that it's found a home.”

Space Shuttle Enterprise (OV-101) at the Intrepid Musem

Fans attending current interactive exhibition Star Trek: The Starfleet Academy Experience at the Intrepid should also check out the Enteprise. For more information on The Starfleet Academy Experience, including VIP ticket packages and other programming at the Museum please visit www.intrepidmuseum.org/Startrek.

]]>
40-years-later-the-legacy-of-the-space-shuttle-enterprise Sat, 17 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Cardassian Union Player Expansion for Ascendancy Out Soon]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/cardassian-union-player-expansion-for-ascendancy-out-soon

The Cardassian Union Player Expansion for Gale Force Nine’s Star Trek: Ascendancy hobby board game will be in stores soon, following the general release of the game. This expansion contains everything players need to add a new civilization as well as another player to their games. The brutal might of the Cardassians dominates the Galaxy as players combine cunning and ruthlessness to defeat their enemies.

Gale Force Nine's Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game

The Cardassian Union is driven by the hunger for resources and territory. Special Rules for the Cardassian player reflect their oppressive society. During the game, a Cardassian players earns bonus Culture Tokens whenever they successfully conqueror another world via Planetary Invasion. Cardassia harvests precious resources through forced labor, so there must always be a military presence on the worlds they control in order to collect Production Tokens.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Console

The player expansion contains all of the game pieces to play as the Cardassian Union, including a Cardassian Control Console, 30 Cardassian Starships, and a unique deck of Cardassian Advancement Cards. The Advancement Cards reflect their commitment to military conquest at the direction of Central Command as well as the subversion of their enemies through the influence of the Obsidian Order. Unique Cardassian Fleet Cards, Trade Agreements and Control Nodes round out the player’s components. The expansion also includes extra Resource Node game pieces, game tokens and space lanes.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Systems Discs

In addition, the Cardassian Union expansion contains ten new Systems to discover, including Cardassia Prime, the homeworld of the Cardassians. The expansion allows players to travel to new worlds such as culture-rich Bajor and desolate Goralis. New to the player expansion are two phenomena with special rules, for example the hazardous Briar Patch wreaks havoc with Starship’s targeting systems, making ships in the phenomena harder to hit.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Ship

New discoveries await players in the form of ten new Exploration Cards; these cards challenge players with a new Crisis card-type, “Confrontations.” A Confrontation card immediately puts players in contact with each other, forcing a choice between diplomacy or conflict.

The Cardassian Union is just the first in planned series of player expansions for the game. In the coming weeks GF9 will give players a look ahead to its second player expansion, the profit-seeking Ferengi Alliance.

Look for Star Trek: Ascendancy and its expansions in game and hobby shops later this fall.

For an in-depth look at the Cardassian Union Player Expansion, visit startrek.gf9games.com. In the following weeks GF9 will offer an in-depth look at the new components found in the expansion, including the new Systems Discs and Exploration Cards.

]]>

The Cardassian Union Player Expansion for Gale Force Nine’s Star Trek: Ascendancy hobby board game will be in stores soon, following the general release of the game. This expansion contains everything players need to add a new civilization as well as another player to their games. The brutal might of the Cardassians dominates the Galaxy as players combine cunning and ruthlessness to defeat their enemies.

Gale Force Nine's Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game

The Cardassian Union is driven by the hunger for resources and territory. Special Rules for the Cardassian player reflect their oppressive society. During the game, a Cardassian players earns bonus Culture Tokens whenever they successfully conqueror another world via Planetary Invasion. Cardassia harvests precious resources through forced labor, so there must always be a military presence on the worlds they control in order to collect Production Tokens.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Console

The player expansion contains all of the game pieces to play as the Cardassian Union, including a Cardassian Control Console, 30 Cardassian Starships, and a unique deck of Cardassian Advancement Cards. The Advancement Cards reflect their commitment to military conquest at the direction of Central Command as well as the subversion of their enemies through the influence of the Obsidian Order. Unique Cardassian Fleet Cards, Trade Agreements and Control Nodes round out the player’s components. The expansion also includes extra Resource Node game pieces, game tokens and space lanes.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Systems Discs

In addition, the Cardassian Union expansion contains ten new Systems to discover, including Cardassia Prime, the homeworld of the Cardassians. The expansion allows players to travel to new worlds such as culture-rich Bajor and desolate Goralis. New to the player expansion are two phenomena with special rules, for example the hazardous Briar Patch wreaks havoc with Starship’s targeting systems, making ships in the phenomena harder to hit.

Star Trek: Ascendancy Hobby Board Game's Cardassian Ship

New discoveries await players in the form of ten new Exploration Cards; these cards challenge players with a new Crisis card-type, “Confrontations.” A Confrontation card immediately puts players in contact with each other, forcing a choice between diplomacy or conflict.

The Cardassian Union is just the first in planned series of player expansions for the game. In the coming weeks GF9 will give players a look ahead to its second player expansion, the profit-seeking Ferengi Alliance.

Look for Star Trek: Ascendancy and its expansions in game and hobby shops later this fall.

For an in-depth look at the Cardassian Union Player Expansion, visit startrek.gf9games.com. In the following weeks GF9 will offer an in-depth look at the new components found in the expansion, including the new Systems Discs and Exploration Cards.

]]>
cardassian-union-player-expansion-for-ascendancy-out-soon Fri, 16 Sep 2016 10:57:05 -0700
<![CDATA[Uniform T-Shirts Ready for Action]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/uniform-t-shirts-ready-for-action

Trevco has just unveiled a quartet of Star Trek uniforms tee shirts that are available now on Amazon.com and come with exclusive stickers. All of the shirts are made of 100% cotton, have been pre-shrunk and can be purchased in sizes ranging from small to 5XL. First up is a red Star Trek Engineering Uniform Shirt with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Scotty and engineering/security insignia stickers.

Star Trek Red Engineering Uniform from Amazon

Next, there's a blue Star Trek Science Uniform Shirt with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Spock and sciences/medical insignia stickers.

Star Trek Blue Science Uniform Shirt from Amazon

And then there's a yellow Star Trek Command Uniform with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Kirk and command insignia stickers.

Star Trek Yellow Command Uniform Shirt from Amazon

Beam up the dark blue Star Trek USS Enterprise T-Shirt, which features a side view of the Enterprise between the words U.S.S. Enterprise and registry number NCC-1701. It comes with TOS cast and Starfleet delta shield stickers.

Star Trek Dark Blue U.S.S Enterprise Shirt from Amazon

 

Finally, there is a Live Long and Prosper Bundle, which features a light blue T-Shirt with Spock on it and says, "Live Long and Prosper." It comes with Spock and Starfleet delta shield stickers. 

Go HERE for the engineering shirt, HERE for the science shirt, HERE for the command shirt and HERE for the Enterprise shirt.

]]>

Trevco has just unveiled a quartet of Star Trek uniforms tee shirts that are available now on Amazon.com and come with exclusive stickers. All of the shirts are made of 100% cotton, have been pre-shrunk and can be purchased in sizes ranging from small to 5XL. First up is a red Star Trek Engineering Uniform Shirt with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Scotty and engineering/security insignia stickers.

Star Trek Red Engineering Uniform from Amazon

Next, there's a blue Star Trek Science Uniform Shirt with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Spock and sciences/medical insignia stickers.

Star Trek Blue Science Uniform Shirt from Amazon

And then there's a yellow Star Trek Command Uniform with Liquid Gold Ink, and it comes with Kirk and command insignia stickers.

Star Trek Yellow Command Uniform Shirt from Amazon

Beam up the dark blue Star Trek USS Enterprise T-Shirt, which features a side view of the Enterprise between the words U.S.S. Enterprise and registry number NCC-1701. It comes with TOS cast and Starfleet delta shield stickers.

Star Trek Dark Blue U.S.S Enterprise Shirt from Amazon

 

Finally, there is a Live Long and Prosper Bundle, which features a light blue T-Shirt with Spock on it and says, "Live Long and Prosper." It comes with Spock and Starfleet delta shield stickers. 

Go HERE for the engineering shirt, HERE for the science shirt, HERE for the command shirt and HERE for the Enterprise shirt.

]]>
uniform-t-shirts-ready-for-action Fri, 16 Sep 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[MMORPG Available on Xbox One and PS4]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mmorpg-available-on-xbox-one-and-ps4

Star Trek Online, the free-to-play MMORPG featuring both space and ground combat, has launched for PS4 and Xbox One. Featuring multiple story arcs directly resulting from, or inspired by actual Star Trek movies and episodes, players can become the star of their own, personalized Star Trek series.

Star Trek Online Infographic

This infographic is designed for players and Star Trek fans alike to see exactly when Star Trek Online takes place, and how the developers weaved dozens of story arcs into the game. While watching the full episode list isn't a requirement to enjoy the game, players are definitely encouraged to do so for the supreme Star Trek experience.

It's available now on PS4 and Xbox One... for free. Pick your console and start playing today.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>

Star Trek Online, the free-to-play MMORPG featuring both space and ground combat, has launched for PS4 and Xbox One. Featuring multiple story arcs directly resulting from, or inspired by actual Star Trek movies and episodes, players can become the star of their own, personalized Star Trek series.

Star Trek Online Infographic

This infographic is designed for players and Star Trek fans alike to see exactly when Star Trek Online takes place, and how the developers weaved dozens of story arcs into the game. While watching the full episode list isn't a requirement to enjoy the game, players are definitely encouraged to do so for the supreme Star Trek experience.

It's available now on PS4 and Xbox One... for free. Pick your console and start playing today.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>
mmorpg-available-on-xbox-one-and-ps4 Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:53:09 -0700
<![CDATA[Artists Signing at 50 Artists. 50 Years. Exhibit in NYC ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/artists-signing-at-50-artists-50-years-exhibit-in-nyc

The Paley Center for Media in New York City has joined the worldwide celebration of Star Trek's 50th anniversary by hosting special screenings, exclusive events, online activities and the original art exhibit Star Trek: 50 Artists. 50 Years. 

On Saturday, September 17, a few of the artists will be at the Paley Center for signings. Check out who will be there and when below: 

  • Derek Charm: 2-6 pm
  • Stanley Chow: 2-6 pm
  • Mark Reihill: 2-6 pm
  • Hyunju Kim: 3-6 pm

Fans can also enjoy three free photo opps: A captain’s chair made out of Mega Bloks, the "Arena" fight scene with Kirk and the Gorn, and also the Salt Vampire in its habitat.

The Paley Center for Media is located at 25 West 52nd Street in Manhattan. Visit paley.me/StarTrek for additional details.

]]>

The Paley Center for Media in New York City has joined the worldwide celebration of Star Trek's 50th anniversary by hosting special screenings, exclusive events, online activities and the original art exhibit Star Trek: 50 Artists. 50 Years. 

On Saturday, September 17, a few of the artists will be at the Paley Center for signings. Check out who will be there and when below: 

  • Derek Charm: 2-6 pm
  • Stanley Chow: 2-6 pm
  • Mark Reihill: 2-6 pm
  • Hyunju Kim: 3-6 pm

Fans can also enjoy three free photo opps: A captain’s chair made out of Mega Bloks, the "Arena" fight scene with Kirk and the Gorn, and also the Salt Vampire in its habitat.

The Paley Center for Media is located at 25 West 52nd Street in Manhattan. Visit paley.me/StarTrek for additional details.

]]>
artists-signing-at-50-artists-50-years-exhibit-in-nyc Thu, 15 Sep 2016 13:49:58 -0700