Star Trek Latest News http://startrek.com Star Trek Latest News Fri, 22 Jul 2016 23:04:02 -0700 info@startrek.com (Star Trek Team) en <![CDATA[Trek Talks: Science, Smithsonian and Star Trek]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/trek-talks-science-smithsonian-and-star-trek

Building Star Trek, a two-hour documentary, will premiere September 4 on the Smithsonian Channel, and attendees at Friday's San Diego Comic-Con panel called Trek Talks: Science, Smithsonian and Star Trek, were treated to a special preview of the film.

Dr. Margaret Weitekamp, Curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum the Smithsonian, served as moderator. She was joined by Brooks Peck, Curator of the EMP Museum in Seattle; David Grier, Professor of Physics and Director of the Center for Soft Matter Research at New York University, who is developing a real-life Tractor Beam; Elizabeth Trojian, Executive Producer of Smithsonian Channel’s Building Star Trek; and Dr. Sonny Kohli, Team Leader of Cloud DX, a finalist for the Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE. 

Dr. Weitekamp first welcomed everyone in the audience to the event and then debuted the trailer, which featured several people on the panel, as well as Nichelle Nichols, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg and David Gerrold. Further, the trailer teased the ways in which the documentary will examine how, from the cutting-edge labs of the Smithsonian Institution to the front lines of the digital economy, the promises -- scientifically and socially -- made in Star Trek are coming true. So that means everything from the phaser, tractor beam and invisibility cloak to the tricorder, communicator and warp drive, not to mention race relations. Also, the documentary will chronicle the exhaustive and brilliant restoration of the 11-foot-long, 200-pound studio model of the U.S.S. Enterprise model from The Original Series. Next, Dr. Weitekamp invited the panelist to talk a bit about themselves and their love of Star Trek. Below are snippets of their comments:

Trojian "was a Next Generation freak as a kid. So it was an honor to work on such a project." The props on the various Trek shows, she noted, were "objects that hold dreams." In other words, part of the documentary's goal was to illustrate how "Star Trek is the stuff of dreams, and helps make dreams real."

Dr. Kohli and his team's tricorder, whether it wins the XPRIZE contest or not, "can detect an outbreak (of an infectious disease) at its source. I'm talking about changing mankind."

Peck saw the Trek exhibit at the EMP Museum as an opportunity to answer the question, "Why does a show, 50 years on, continue to influence so many people in so many ways?"

Grier and his team, thanks to a failed scientific endeavor, discovered the basics of a tractor beam. Of course, it's just a start, as Trek-like functionality "is a couple of hundred years away from reality."

The conversation then turned the documentary's examination of the Enterprise model restoration effort. It's been a five-year process, Dr. Weitekamp noted, her personal five-year mission to remove the model from its gift shop home, restore her to her former glory and give her a new home in the just-opened Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall at the Smithsonian.

She pointed out that the model "is a miniature in that it's smaller than the real original ship would have been," and noted that the last time it had been touched for production was during the making of "The Trouble with Tribbles." It had not been worked on at the Smithsonian since 1991, so "the project became how to get it in better shape and in a better place."

The floor was then opened to fans, who posed questions to the panelists until time ran out. One question stood out, as a fan inquired about if or when the Smithsonian's restoration team will release the color codes used when refurbishing the Enterprise model. Dr. Weitekamp said, "Yes, the codes will be released," eliciting genuine excitement among more than a few people, clearly modelers, in the audience. The codes may be revealed "later this month," but more likely in August.

Building Star Trek will premiere September 4 on the Smithsonian Channel.

]]>

Building Star Trek, a two-hour documentary, will premiere September 4 on the Smithsonian Channel, and attendees at Friday's San Diego Comic-Con panel called Trek Talks: Science, Smithsonian and Star Trek, were treated to a special preview of the film.

Dr. Margaret Weitekamp, Curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum the Smithsonian, served as moderator. She was joined by Brooks Peck, Curator of the EMP Museum in Seattle; David Grier, Professor of Physics and Director of the Center for Soft Matter Research at New York University, who is developing a real-life Tractor Beam; Elizabeth Trojian, Executive Producer of Smithsonian Channel’s Building Star Trek; and Dr. Sonny Kohli, Team Leader of Cloud DX, a finalist for the Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE. 

Dr. Weitekamp first welcomed everyone in the audience to the event and then debuted the trailer, which featured several people on the panel, as well as Nichelle Nichols, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg and David Gerrold. Further, the trailer teased the ways in which the documentary will examine how, from the cutting-edge labs of the Smithsonian Institution to the front lines of the digital economy, the promises -- scientifically and socially -- made in Star Trek are coming true. So that means everything from the phaser, tractor beam and invisibility cloak to the tricorder, communicator and warp drive, not to mention race relations. Also, the documentary will chronicle the exhaustive and brilliant restoration of the 11-foot-long, 200-pound studio model of the U.S.S. Enterprise model from The Original Series. Next, Dr. Weitekamp invited the panelist to talk a bit about themselves and their love of Star Trek. Below are snippets of their comments:

Trojian "was a Next Generation freak as a kid. So it was an honor to work on such a project." The props on the various Trek shows, she noted, were "objects that hold dreams." In other words, part of the documentary's goal was to illustrate how "Star Trek is the stuff of dreams, and helps make dreams real."

Dr. Kohli and his team's tricorder, whether it wins the XPRIZE contest or not, "can detect an outbreak (of an infectious disease) at its source. I'm talking about changing mankind."

Peck saw the Trek exhibit at the EMP Museum as an opportunity to answer the question, "Why does a show, 50 years on, continue to influence so many people in so many ways?"

Grier and his team, thanks to a failed scientific endeavor, discovered the basics of a tractor beam. Of course, it's just a start, as Trek-like functionality "is a couple of hundred years away from reality."

The conversation then turned the documentary's examination of the Enterprise model restoration effort. It's been a five-year process, Dr. Weitekamp noted, her personal five-year mission to remove the model from its gift shop home, restore her to her former glory and give her a new home in the just-opened Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall at the Smithsonian.

She pointed out that the model "is a miniature in that it's smaller than the real original ship would have been," and noted that the last time it had been touched for production was during the making of "The Trouble with Tribbles." It had not been worked on at the Smithsonian since 1991, so "the project became how to get it in better shape and in a better place."

The floor was then opened to fans, who posed questions to the panelists until time ran out. One question stood out, as a fan inquired about if or when the Smithsonian's restoration team will release the color codes used when refurbishing the Enterprise model. Dr. Weitekamp said, "Yes, the codes will be released," eliciting genuine excitement among more than a few people, clearly modelers, in the audience. The codes may be revealed "later this month," but more likely in August.

Building Star Trek will premiere September 4 on the Smithsonian Channel.

]]>
trek-talks-science-smithsonian-and-star-trek Fri, 22 Jul 2016 23:04:02 -0700
<![CDATA[Five Decades of Star Trek Comics Honored at SDCC]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/five-decades-of-star-trek-comics-honored-at-sdcc

Star Trek: Five Decades of Comics -- a panel held on Friday at Comic-Con -- brought together a Who's Who of comic book figures that included writers Mike Johnson, Len Wein, Scott Tipton and Donny Cates, artist JK Woodward, IDW Publishing's Sarah Gaydos (who moderated) and Chris Ryall, as well as John Van Citters from CBS Consumer Products. The group took the fans in attendance through a detailed and engaging celebration of all the 4-color Star Trek worlds, featuring a look at every past iteration, via a timeline, and previews of things to come.

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Sarah Gaydos

Gaydos started by noting that Star Trek comics have been their nearly from the beginning of Trek, "even before, in some cases, a particular country got to see the shows or movies. That's kind of awesome, in a way."

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Len Wein

Wein recounted that he was working for Gold Key when he asked his bosses, "Do you mind if I took it (the Trek line) over?" As he noted, he was "the one who really knew about Star Trek." He corrected mistakes, including fire spewing for the Enterprise's nacelles. Gaydos, talking over visuals on a screen, showed how the Trek line of comics evolved as it moved from company to company, including:

Gold Key

Star Trek Comics - Gold Key

Marvel

Star Trek Comics - Marvel

Wildstorm

Star Trek Comics - Wildstorm

Tokyopop

Star Trek Comics - Toyko Pop

IDW

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing

And then, of course, there were Trek-centric newspaper comic strips, also collected in book form for recent IDW releases, as well as the utterly unforgettable Give-a-Show Projector sagas. 

IDW Publishing has issued Star Trek comics since 2007 and the group talked animatedly about the behind-the-scenes machinations that resulted in Harlan Ellison bringing to life his City on the Edge of Forever long-form story, which also involved Mike Johnson and JK Woodward.

Star Trek Comics - The City on the Edge of Forever

Wein illustrated the challenge when he quipped that "Harlan likes to burn bridges... while he's on them." Woodward called it "the most nerve-wracking job I ever worked on... at first." When they met, Ellison complimented Woodward's art but insulted his choice of clothes. "It was oddly calming," Woodward said, "after he insulted me."

After talking about the first nearly 50 years of Trek comics, Gaydos reached the "forever" part of the conversation. The current Star Trek ongoing series will conclude with issues 59 and 60, in which, quite inventively, the classic TOS crew will crossover with the current Enterprise crew.

Star Trek Comics - Mike Johnson Issue 59 & Issue 60

Gaydos showed images of panels featuring Leonard Nimoy's Spock interacting with Chris Pine's Kirk. Problems presented to the Enterprise crews, Gaydos promised, will be solved old-school Trek style, "with teamwork and science."

Gaydos also previewed other upcoming Trek series, including the just-announced Boldly Go, set following the events of Beyond. Issue #1 be out in October.

Star Trek Comics - Boldly Go

And then there's Waypoint, out in September, an anthology that will celebrate every iteration of Trek. The Woodward covers for it are a remarkable, franchise-spanning triptych. Cates is writing it, having been approached initially by Gaydos via text. She'd asked if he's a Trek nerd. "I'm 30 and I work in comics," he recalled replying to her. "Of course, I am." And Gaydos also offered an exclusive reveal of Issue #2, which will feature a Gold Key-style cover. 

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Waypoint

And the hour ended with Van Citters and IDW honoring Johnson as "The most-prolific writer of Star Trek comics... Ever." Johnson smiled broadly as the audience applauded and he accepted a gorgeous art piece, created by Woodward, which depicted Johnson in the captain's chair of the Enterprise.

]]>

Star Trek: Five Decades of Comics -- a panel held on Friday at Comic-Con -- brought together a Who's Who of comic book figures that included writers Mike Johnson, Len Wein, Scott Tipton and Donny Cates, artist JK Woodward, IDW Publishing's Sarah Gaydos (who moderated) and Chris Ryall, as well as John Van Citters from CBS Consumer Products. The group took the fans in attendance through a detailed and engaging celebration of all the 4-color Star Trek worlds, featuring a look at every past iteration, via a timeline, and previews of things to come.

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Sarah Gaydos

Gaydos started by noting that Star Trek comics have been their nearly from the beginning of Trek, "even before, in some cases, a particular country got to see the shows or movies. That's kind of awesome, in a way."

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Len Wein

Wein recounted that he was working for Gold Key when he asked his bosses, "Do you mind if I took it (the Trek line) over?" As he noted, he was "the one who really knew about Star Trek." He corrected mistakes, including fire spewing for the Enterprise's nacelles. Gaydos, talking over visuals on a screen, showed how the Trek line of comics evolved as it moved from company to company, including:

Gold Key

Star Trek Comics - Gold Key

Marvel

Star Trek Comics - Marvel

Wildstorm

Star Trek Comics - Wildstorm

Tokyopop

Star Trek Comics - Toyko Pop

IDW

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing

And then, of course, there were Trek-centric newspaper comic strips, also collected in book form for recent IDW releases, as well as the utterly unforgettable Give-a-Show Projector sagas. 

IDW Publishing has issued Star Trek comics since 2007 and the group talked animatedly about the behind-the-scenes machinations that resulted in Harlan Ellison bringing to life his City on the Edge of Forever long-form story, which also involved Mike Johnson and JK Woodward.

Star Trek Comics - The City on the Edge of Forever

Wein illustrated the challenge when he quipped that "Harlan likes to burn bridges... while he's on them." Woodward called it "the most nerve-wracking job I ever worked on... at first." When they met, Ellison complimented Woodward's art but insulted his choice of clothes. "It was oddly calming," Woodward said, "after he insulted me."

After talking about the first nearly 50 years of Trek comics, Gaydos reached the "forever" part of the conversation. The current Star Trek ongoing series will conclude with issues 59 and 60, in which, quite inventively, the classic TOS crew will crossover with the current Enterprise crew.

Star Trek Comics - Mike Johnson Issue 59 & Issue 60

Gaydos showed images of panels featuring Leonard Nimoy's Spock interacting with Chris Pine's Kirk. Problems presented to the Enterprise crews, Gaydos promised, will be solved old-school Trek style, "with teamwork and science."

Gaydos also previewed other upcoming Trek series, including the just-announced Boldly Go, set following the events of Beyond. Issue #1 be out in October.

Star Trek Comics - Boldly Go

And then there's Waypoint, out in September, an anthology that will celebrate every iteration of Trek. The Woodward covers for it are a remarkable, franchise-spanning triptych. Cates is writing it, having been approached initially by Gaydos via text. She'd asked if he's a Trek nerd. "I'm 30 and I work in comics," he recalled replying to her. "Of course, I am." And Gaydos also offered an exclusive reveal of Issue #2, which will feature a Gold Key-style cover. 

Star Trek Comics - IDW Publishing Waypoint

And the hour ended with Van Citters and IDW honoring Johnson as "The most-prolific writer of Star Trek comics... Ever." Johnson smiled broadly as the audience applauded and he accepted a gorgeous art piece, created by Woodward, which depicted Johnson in the captain's chair of the Enterprise.

]]>
five-decades-of-star-trek-comics-honored-at-sdcc Fri, 22 Jul 2016 22:35:41 -0700
<![CDATA[Personal Log, Ensign Davis Wexler]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/personal-log-ensign-davis-wexler

I never thought I’d be mining rocks with a bunch of lizard-people on a planet created out of thin air by a group of godlike aliens.

I read about how the original Federation colony on Cestus III was wiped out by the Gorn, so I wasn’t too thrilled when I was assigned to Edren IV as part of a joint Federation-Gorn mining operation. Sure, we’re technically at peace with them now -- Captain Kirk of the Enterprise somehow managed to broker a peace treaty with the Gorn Hegemony. But I still wonder how long that peace will last with such a -- literally -- cold-blooded race.

That being said, the Gorn seem to be pretty good miners! We’ve managed to help boost the efficiency of their mining drills, all the while avoiding the geological instabilities inherent to EdrenIV. As long as no one gets too impatient and overcharges the drills, this should be a relatively safe expedition.

We’re supposed to be getting some off-world visitors today, some special agents of the Federation sent to inspect our mining operations. Good timing! Anything to liven things up around here. Aside from its rich mining resources, Edren IV is a pretty dull place.

In “Miner Instabilities,” you are sent to Edren IV to investigate a temporal anomaly as part of a response team. A joint Federation-Gorn mining expedition has fallen under attack by Romulan forces, possibly with the aid of time travelers. You must drive the attackers back from the Federation camp, rescue the Gorn miners and then split your forces to attack the Romulan-occupied mining camp on two fronts.

“Miner Instabilities” is a new PvE queue available for levels 51+, allowing you to earn Fleet Marks or Temporal Marks.

 

Randy “Arkayne” Mosiondz

Senior Game Designer

Star Trek Online

]]>

I never thought I’d be mining rocks with a bunch of lizard-people on a planet created out of thin air by a group of godlike aliens.

I read about how the original Federation colony on Cestus III was wiped out by the Gorn, so I wasn’t too thrilled when I was assigned to Edren IV as part of a joint Federation-Gorn mining operation. Sure, we’re technically at peace with them now -- Captain Kirk of the Enterprise somehow managed to broker a peace treaty with the Gorn Hegemony. But I still wonder how long that peace will last with such a -- literally -- cold-blooded race.

That being said, the Gorn seem to be pretty good miners! We’ve managed to help boost the efficiency of their mining drills, all the while avoiding the geological instabilities inherent to EdrenIV. As long as no one gets too impatient and overcharges the drills, this should be a relatively safe expedition.

We’re supposed to be getting some off-world visitors today, some special agents of the Federation sent to inspect our mining operations. Good timing! Anything to liven things up around here. Aside from its rich mining resources, Edren IV is a pretty dull place.

In “Miner Instabilities,” you are sent to Edren IV to investigate a temporal anomaly as part of a response team. A joint Federation-Gorn mining expedition has fallen under attack by Romulan forces, possibly with the aid of time travelers. You must drive the attackers back from the Federation camp, rescue the Gorn miners and then split your forces to attack the Romulan-occupied mining camp on two fronts.

“Miner Instabilities” is a new PvE queue available for levels 51+, allowing you to earn Fleet Marks or Temporal Marks.

 

Randy “Arkayne” Mosiondz

Senior Game Designer

Star Trek Online

]]>
personal-log-ensign-davis-wexler Fri, 22 Jul 2016 03:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[50th Anniversary Art Exhibition Opens]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/50th-anniversary-art-exhibition-opens

The Michael J. Wolf Fine Arts gallery in San Diego is the Comic-Con home to Star Trek: 50 Artists. 50 Years., the art exhibit created to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star Trek. Showcasing original, Trek-inspired pieces by 50 artists from around the globe, the exhibit has drawn the attention of Trek fans and art fans both casual and professional. Even zombie killers are making their way into the exhibition, as evidenced by the unexpected, low-key visit on Friday by Andrew Lincoln, star of The Walking Dead.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Throughout the Comic-Con weekend, fans can visit the free exhibition and snag autographs from many of the artists featured in the exhibition.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

StarTrek.com sat down with several of the artists to discuss their love of Trek, their individual pieces and/or what it means to them to be included amongst the 50 artists selected for the ambitious, years-in-the making exhibit.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Paul Shipper

Paul Shipper, whose piece is "Star Trek Inception: The Cage," told StarTrek.com, "To be asked to be a part of the selected 50 artists is a great honor, and to celebrate the whole thing in its 50th year is incredible. Walking into the gallery here, and seeing the art on the wall for the first time was an experience. You could actually feel it. It was a visceral kind of feeling when I walked in and the first thing I saw was actually the piece by Leonard Nimoy on the wall there. The artwork here is phenomenal There are so many different styles and concepts, and everyone is coming from different places. It is a real celebration of Star Trek, and I’m really pleased to be a part of it."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Amir Abou-Roumie

Amir Abou-Roumie, represented by the colorful, Easter egg-laden "Homestead," explained, "What I wanted to convey was the kind of positivity that Star Trek has, in my opinion, that it is represented in the colors and in the figures on it. And I also wanted to capture key moments for me, which had a kind of meaning, like the waves from Star Trek IV, and First Contact which is in the background. So that is what I wanted to get. What I also wanted to get is kind of a look behind the scenes, you know? Of a real Star Trek world. When people go to work in the morning, they travel to the Enterprise with the shuttle bus and stuff like that. So I just wanted to take an ordinary look at Star Trek. A day in the life of Star Trek."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Gary Pullin

"I am a pretty big Star Trek fan, said Gary Pullin, who contributed a star Dual Spock piece called "Mirror Mirror." "I mean, I grew up on The Original Series, so I’m at that age where, when I was a kid, Star Trek was on TV, the repeats. So, TOS is what I gravitated towards when they asked me to do this piece. I just remember loving the theme song, and it had a real Twilight Zone vibe to some of the episodes, too. Some of them were kind of spooky, and I actually have a background as a horror illustrator. I’m sort of known for the horror genre, and so when they asked me to do this show, I thought, 'Oh, well this is really great.' As I say, I like to step out of the graveyard sometimes, and I am starting to do more stuff out of the horror genre. So to do something Star Trek related was a dream come true for me. "

JK Woodward's piece gathers together many of Star Trek's most memorable and fearsome "Klingons." Actually, it's every Klingon. Woodward explained how he crafted the piece on illustration board, which is basically compressed cardboard that’s treated. "And, it was done in gouache, which is a very difficult medium to master but it was kind of what they used in advertising a lot in the 60’s and 70’s, before we moved" on to computer generated stuff," he said. "Basically, what I did was I did a sketch first, and then I projected that sketch with one of those opaque projectors on to that so I got all of the proportions down. And from there just one step at a time; I drew all the likenesses, went back and did all of the shadows and blacks, so it almost looked like a comic book at first It looked like an ink piece, and then you go back and you do the colors. I spent about a week on that, and about ten hours a day, so it was a big project.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

Adam Nimoy, Leonard Nimoy's son, also stopped by the gallery. Logically, it amazed him to see so much Spock imagery staring back at him from the walls. "I’m so glad that there’s something of his here to contribute to the 50 years and 50 pieces of artwork," he told us as he looked at "Hand in Vulcan Gesture."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

"I mean, the stuff is just outstanding. And, seeing so much Spock imagery, well, I'm used to it. I love it, I’m still excited by it. When I was a kid I used to look up his name in the phonebook because I was just excited to see that we existed somewhere. The Nimoys were real, you know? And very early on, I was always looking at TV Guide trying to find the first ad for Star Trek before it aired. Waiting, waiting, waiting, and finally when they had a half page ad of dad and Bill, which was the illustration that they used for the first promo piece, I was so excited that I bought the TV Guide, and I ran home to show my mom and my sister."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

"I still feel the excitement; it just never leaves, it keeps resonating because it keeps coming back in all of these different ways, including these representations of Spock at the gallery here. It's phenomenal."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Joe Corroney

Joe Corroney, familiar to fans for his frequent Trek work for IDW's comics, has the distinction of having two pieces in the exhibition, "Dance of the Orion Women" and "It's Your Galaxy, too!" "I asked CBS if I could do two because I felt I had two really good ides," Corroney noted. "I didn't want to settle on just one and, luckily, they said OK, and I feel really honored in that regard. I wanted one piece geared toward the guy fans of Star Trek and then one geared toward the female fans. So the Orion piece has a retro, Vegas showgirl style poster feel. And it's got a little tongue-in-cheek humor with the portraits of the male character reacting to her. Then, for the other piece, it says, 'Hey, Star Trek isn't just for the boys." It's something girls and women can enjoy. So this one is like an enlistment poster. It's kind of pin-uppy, but not overly sexy like the Orion one. I wanted it to be more empowering and dynamic and adventurous."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Fernando Reza

Next, we chatted with Fernando Reza, the graphic artist/illustrator known as FRO. His piece, "NCC-1701," has a movie poster style. "At first I tried to do very specific stuff, things from episodes I loved," he told us. "Then I realized, no, I was going too many places with it. So I just wanted something all-encompassing, kind of like what you're saying about a movie poster approach. Then, it was just finding the right likenesses to go off of. So that was more my focus, just capturing the general spirit." 

Lastly, StarTrek.com spoke to Dusty Abell, whose oversized, super-colorful contribution is called "Star Trek: The Original Series." An homage to TOS, it boasts at least one creature, ship or character from all 79 episodes. "It's a blast to be included in the exhibit," Abell said. "I grew up with Star Trek and have a great passion for it. So it was an honor to be included with so many other great artists and pieces of art. It's something I'll always look back on with a lot of fond memories. With the 50th anniversary and all, it's a big deal."

The exhibition is open from 11:00am to 8:00pm on Friday and Saturday, and 11:00am to 5:00pm on Sunday at 363 Fifth Avenue in San Diego's Gaslamp District. See Star Trek Events for the latest touring schedule.

]]>

The Michael J. Wolf Fine Arts gallery in San Diego is the Comic-Con home to Star Trek: 50 Artists. 50 Years., the art exhibit created to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star Trek. Showcasing original, Trek-inspired pieces by 50 artists from around the globe, the exhibit has drawn the attention of Trek fans and art fans both casual and professional. Even zombie killers are making their way into the exhibition, as evidenced by the unexpected, low-key visit on Friday by Andrew Lincoln, star of The Walking Dead.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

Throughout the Comic-Con weekend, fans can visit the free exhibition and snag autographs from many of the artists featured in the exhibition.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition

StarTrek.com sat down with several of the artists to discuss their love of Trek, their individual pieces and/or what it means to them to be included amongst the 50 artists selected for the ambitious, years-in-the making exhibit.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Paul Shipper

Paul Shipper, whose piece is "Star Trek Inception: The Cage," told StarTrek.com, "To be asked to be a part of the selected 50 artists is a great honor, and to celebrate the whole thing in its 50th year is incredible. Walking into the gallery here, and seeing the art on the wall for the first time was an experience. You could actually feel it. It was a visceral kind of feeling when I walked in and the first thing I saw was actually the piece by Leonard Nimoy on the wall there. The artwork here is phenomenal There are so many different styles and concepts, and everyone is coming from different places. It is a real celebration of Star Trek, and I’m really pleased to be a part of it."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Amir Abou-Roumie

Amir Abou-Roumie, represented by the colorful, Easter egg-laden "Homestead," explained, "What I wanted to convey was the kind of positivity that Star Trek has, in my opinion, that it is represented in the colors and in the figures on it. And I also wanted to capture key moments for me, which had a kind of meaning, like the waves from Star Trek IV, and First Contact which is in the background. So that is what I wanted to get. What I also wanted to get is kind of a look behind the scenes, you know? Of a real Star Trek world. When people go to work in the morning, they travel to the Enterprise with the shuttle bus and stuff like that. So I just wanted to take an ordinary look at Star Trek. A day in the life of Star Trek."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art Exhibition - Gary Pullin

"I am a pretty big Star Trek fan, said Gary Pullin, who contributed a star Dual Spock piece called "Mirror Mirror." "I mean, I grew up on The Original Series, so I’m at that age where, when I was a kid, Star Trek was on TV, the repeats. So, TOS is what I gravitated towards when they asked me to do this piece. I just remember loving the theme song, and it had a real Twilight Zone vibe to some of the episodes, too. Some of them were kind of spooky, and I actually have a background as a horror illustrator. I’m sort of known for the horror genre, and so when they asked me to do this show, I thought, 'Oh, well this is really great.' As I say, I like to step out of the graveyard sometimes, and I am starting to do more stuff out of the horror genre. So to do something Star Trek related was a dream come true for me. "

JK Woodward's piece gathers together many of Star Trek's most memorable and fearsome "Klingons." Actually, it's every Klingon. Woodward explained how he crafted the piece on illustration board, which is basically compressed cardboard that’s treated. "And, it was done in gouache, which is a very difficult medium to master but it was kind of what they used in advertising a lot in the 60’s and 70’s, before we moved" on to computer generated stuff," he said. "Basically, what I did was I did a sketch first, and then I projected that sketch with one of those opaque projectors on to that so I got all of the proportions down. And from there just one step at a time; I drew all the likenesses, went back and did all of the shadows and blacks, so it almost looked like a comic book at first It looked like an ink piece, and then you go back and you do the colors. I spent about a week on that, and about ten hours a day, so it was a big project.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

Adam Nimoy, Leonard Nimoy's son, also stopped by the gallery. Logically, it amazed him to see so much Spock imagery staring back at him from the walls. "I’m so glad that there’s something of his here to contribute to the 50 years and 50 pieces of artwork," he told us as he looked at "Hand in Vulcan Gesture."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

"I mean, the stuff is just outstanding. And, seeing so much Spock imagery, well, I'm used to it. I love it, I’m still excited by it. When I was a kid I used to look up his name in the phonebook because I was just excited to see that we existed somewhere. The Nimoys were real, you know? And very early on, I was always looking at TV Guide trying to find the first ad for Star Trek before it aired. Waiting, waiting, waiting, and finally when they had a half page ad of dad and Bill, which was the illustration that they used for the first promo piece, I was so excited that I bought the TV Guide, and I ran home to show my mom and my sister."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Adam Nimoy

"I still feel the excitement; it just never leaves, it keeps resonating because it keeps coming back in all of these different ways, including these representations of Spock at the gallery here. It's phenomenal."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Joe Corroney

Joe Corroney, familiar to fans for his frequent Trek work for IDW's comics, has the distinction of having two pieces in the exhibition, "Dance of the Orion Women" and "It's Your Galaxy, too!" "I asked CBS if I could do two because I felt I had two really good ides," Corroney noted. "I didn't want to settle on just one and, luckily, they said OK, and I feel really honored in that regard. I wanted one piece geared toward the guy fans of Star Trek and then one geared toward the female fans. So the Orion piece has a retro, Vegas showgirl style poster feel. And it's got a little tongue-in-cheek humor with the portraits of the male character reacting to her. Then, for the other piece, it says, 'Hey, Star Trek isn't just for the boys." It's something girls and women can enjoy. So this one is like an enlistment poster. It's kind of pin-uppy, but not overly sexy like the Orion one. I wanted it to be more empowering and dynamic and adventurous."

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Art - Fernando Reza

Next, we chatted with Fernando Reza, the graphic artist/illustrator known as FRO. His piece, "NCC-1701," has a movie poster style. "At first I tried to do very specific stuff, things from episodes I loved," he told us. "Then I realized, no, I was going too many places with it. So I just wanted something all-encompassing, kind of like what you're saying about a movie poster approach. Then, it was just finding the right likenesses to go off of. So that was more my focus, just capturing the general spirit." 

Lastly, StarTrek.com spoke to Dusty Abell, whose oversized, super-colorful contribution is called "Star Trek: The Original Series." An homage to TOS, it boasts at least one creature, ship or character from all 79 episodes. "It's a blast to be included in the exhibit," Abell said. "I grew up with Star Trek and have a great passion for it. So it was an honor to be included with so many other great artists and pieces of art. It's something I'll always look back on with a lot of fond memories. With the 50th anniversary and all, it's a big deal."

The exhibition is open from 11:00am to 8:00pm on Friday and Saturday, and 11:00am to 5:00pm on Sunday at 363 Fifth Avenue in San Diego's Gaslamp District. See Star Trek Events for the latest touring schedule.

]]>
50th-anniversary-art-exhibition-opens Thu, 21 Jul 2016 23:46:05 -0700
<![CDATA[M-A-C Transports Star Trek to Comic-Con]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/m-a-c-transports-star-trek-to-comic-con

When was the last time you saw countless women -- and men -- stop in their tracks for a makeup display as they walked the streets near the convention center during San Diego Comic-Con? Well, this was no ordinary makeup display.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

M-A-C pulled out ALL the stops as they gave fans a sneak peek at their upcoming M-A-C Star Trek makeup collection. The collection of lipsticks, powders, eye shadows, nail lacquer, eye liner, lash and brushes is inspired by Star Trek and, more specifically, Deanna Troi, Uhura, Seven of Nine and the Orion Girl, Vina. 

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

But we digress. The makeup is great, inventive, stylish, functional and even a bit futuristic, but rarely does previewing a new product line wow so many people. M-A-C commissioned a huge, sectioned, spherical and very Trek-like station that features a Ten Forward area, an interactive transporter section (yes, you can beam up and down), and an engineering warp core, along with Trek music, atmospheric smoke, view screens, computer terminals and more.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

At regular intervals, fans are treated to scripted character appearances by Uhura (who sings, accompanied by Spock on a familiar instrument; they also talk about relationships), Vina, Troi and Data, and Seven of Nine on her own. And all around, male Red Shirts are happy to pose for photos.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

Of course, introducing the makeup to prospective customers is the ultimate goal, and M-A-C isn't stinting there, either. They have about 40 makeup artists total, providing free makeovers to visitors.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

They'll amplify your natural look or get you ready for serious Trek cosplay. And, sure, even non-Trek cosplayers can get in on the action. We saw a young lady getting her Game of Thrones on. Oh, and every element has a Trek touch. The makeup artists don't go to a storage cupboard; they go to a Jefferies Tube. Products can also be purchased on the premises and fans receive a couple of Trek-themed freebies.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

"This has been years in the making," Dominic Skinner, one of M-A-C's international senior artists and a huge Trek fan, told StarTrek.com in a thick British accent as he escorted us on a tour of the station. "In the discussions we had over the months and years, the same thing kept coming back to us, and that is it isn't about makeup, it's about beauty. The female characters on the shows, they weren't heavily made up. They were just elegantly enhanced. 

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

"So the products that we've chosen and the colors that we've picked for the collection really works with that," continued Skinner, who provided input into the development of the station and happily reveals that he suggested the presence of the Red Shirts. "There are a few fun, weird things, like a gold and a silver lipgloss and a gold and a silver eyeliner, because those colors are very representational of the uniforms, of the costumes, but also we have some very beautiful skin colors, natural tones that just work and complement the skin. And the response from the fans has been so goose-bumpy and uplifting."

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

M-A-C will soon take their Trek makeup show on the road, with Star Trek Las Vegas the next destination. And these stops are the only opportunity to buy products from the M-A-C Star Trek collection until the line is made available to the public on September 1.

The M-A-C station is located at the cross-section of Island Avenue and Front Street. It's open each day from 10:00am to 7:00pm.

]]>

When was the last time you saw countless women -- and men -- stop in their tracks for a makeup display as they walked the streets near the convention center during San Diego Comic-Con? Well, this was no ordinary makeup display.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

M-A-C pulled out ALL the stops as they gave fans a sneak peek at their upcoming M-A-C Star Trek makeup collection. The collection of lipsticks, powders, eye shadows, nail lacquer, eye liner, lash and brushes is inspired by Star Trek and, more specifically, Deanna Troi, Uhura, Seven of Nine and the Orion Girl, Vina. 

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

But we digress. The makeup is great, inventive, stylish, functional and even a bit futuristic, but rarely does previewing a new product line wow so many people. M-A-C commissioned a huge, sectioned, spherical and very Trek-like station that features a Ten Forward area, an interactive transporter section (yes, you can beam up and down), and an engineering warp core, along with Trek music, atmospheric smoke, view screens, computer terminals and more.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

At regular intervals, fans are treated to scripted character appearances by Uhura (who sings, accompanied by Spock on a familiar instrument; they also talk about relationships), Vina, Troi and Data, and Seven of Nine on her own. And all around, male Red Shirts are happy to pose for photos.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

Of course, introducing the makeup to prospective customers is the ultimate goal, and M-A-C isn't stinting there, either. They have about 40 makeup artists total, providing free makeovers to visitors.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

They'll amplify your natural look or get you ready for serious Trek cosplay. And, sure, even non-Trek cosplayers can get in on the action. We saw a young lady getting her Game of Thrones on. Oh, and every element has a Trek touch. The makeup artists don't go to a storage cupboard; they go to a Jefferies Tube. Products can also be purchased on the premises and fans receive a couple of Trek-themed freebies.

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

"This has been years in the making," Dominic Skinner, one of M-A-C's international senior artists and a huge Trek fan, told StarTrek.com in a thick British accent as he escorted us on a tour of the station. "In the discussions we had over the months and years, the same thing kept coming back to us, and that is it isn't about makeup, it's about beauty. The female characters on the shows, they weren't heavily made up. They were just elegantly enhanced. 

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

"So the products that we've chosen and the colors that we've picked for the collection really works with that," continued Skinner, who provided input into the development of the station and happily reveals that he suggested the presence of the Red Shirts. "There are a few fun, weird things, like a gold and a silver lipgloss and a gold and a silver eyeliner, because those colors are very representational of the uniforms, of the costumes, but also we have some very beautiful skin colors, natural tones that just work and complement the skin. And the response from the fans has been so goose-bumpy and uplifting."

Star Trek M-A-C at San Diego Comic-Con

M-A-C will soon take their Trek makeup show on the road, with Star Trek Las Vegas the next destination. And these stops are the only opportunity to buy products from the M-A-C Star Trek collection until the line is made available to the public on September 1.

The M-A-C station is located at the cross-section of Island Avenue and Front Street. It's open each day from 10:00am to 7:00pm.

]]>
m-a-c-transports-star-trek-to-comic-con Thu, 21 Jul 2016 23:25:32 -0700
<![CDATA[Fan's Love of Trek Leads to Command Green Replica Shirt ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/fans-love-of-trek-leads-to-command-green-replica-shirt

Did you know that if you're reading this story there's a 92.47% chance that you are a Star Trek fan? My name is John Cooley, I'm a Trekkie, and I work for ANOVOS. We make stage-accurate replicas of props and costumes from Star Trek. Over the last couple of months, I've been swapping messages with friends who work for companies like mine --  that live in and around Star Trek. How and when did we become fans? Friends like Ben at Eaglemoss (The Official Starships Collection) or Chris of The Wand Company (The Bluetooth Communicator), and the people in CBS and Paramount like Holly and Dave. You know what we have in common? We all LOVE Star Trek. Every last one of us was a Trekkie first, and someone who works near our favorite thing second. I wonder sometimes if the average fan realizes that almost everyone who works for these companies and so many others -- from someone building a set for the new series, to someone working in the archives -- does it for that same reason, because we love Star Trek so much.

Case in point? Yours truly.

Original Green Shirt

At four years old I already loved watching Star Trek, and one day my Mom gave me a command green Donmoor Star Trek shirt. I lived and played "Landing Party" in that uniform shirt far past the time I outgrew it. I retired it and made a folded, framed display out of it, but never forgot how it felt to look down at my chest and see a Starfleet insignia there. Wearing that shirt made me feel like an actual member of the Enterprise crew, and that was a feeling I was determined to have again.

Star Trek Shirts

So I became really focused on Star Trek's costumes -- especially the uniforms. I learned as much as I could about Star Trek's costumes and their designers. I guess it was how I expressed my fandom. Others collected model ships, and toys, or tried to re-create phasers and communicators, while I was in my Dad's garage making Starfleet insignia pins. Wood, plastic, cardboard, whatever I had at hand using still pictures from old sci-fi fan magazines (like Starlog) for reference. They were crude attempts at best, and the bar had been set really high when I was a kid in that green shirt. From a kid's point of view it looked like it came from the set. The collar was shaped right. It had raglan sleeves, and that insignia patch looked just like Captain Kirk's.

I kept trying.

Anovos Green Shirt

Fan patterns, tailors, seamstresses… I tried a lot of the same costuming choices that Trekkies had before ANOVOS with limited success. Nothing ever felt, or looked, exactly like it was on the screen. Then ANOVOS came along, and suddenly any Star Trek uniform I had ever wanted seemed possible: The Original Series, Next Gen, even The Wrath of Khan. There was only one thing missing. As much as I'd wanted a screen-accurate Starfleet uniform, I'd also always wanted to wear my little green Star Trek shirt again.

As luck – or fate – would have it, I joined ANOVOS in 2013, and almost immediately asked if they'd be interested in re-creating those original Star Trek shirts. You see, they had been the very first officially manufactured Starfleet uniforms ever made, and so, in a way, they were the ancestors of our replica uniforms today. My bosses were skeptical, but only a couple of months after I had joined the company they allowed me to casually run the idea past John Van Citters at CBS Consumer Products. He said it was an interesting idea, and thought that my shirts might be something fun to bring back during the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek. I was reallllly happy, and then realized that was another three years away. Fine. we had work to do to anyway.

Anovos Donmoor Star Trek Shirts

We approached re-creating those first Star Trek shirts like we would any other replica. Between other projects, our Creative Services Manager, Steve Fronzcek, and I compiled as much research as we could. We worked from my original 40-year-old shirts -- I actually had two as a kid (my green one, and a gold shirt) -- and from any surviving materials we could find. We worked hard to match colors and materials as precisely as we could. We even had fabric custom dyed just for these replicas. When we could have just used insignia patches that we already make for our other Original Series uniforms, we instead re-created the original 1975 insignia. And where the original Donmoor shirts only had a command insignia (regardless of department color), we went a step further and made Sciences and Operations emblems in the same style as those old patches. Finally, we handed off our research (and an original shirt) to our Soft Goods Director, Maegen Hensley, who ensured that our recreated shirts were as perfect as they could be while scaling them up for adults.

John Cooley and daughter

So, here we are, its July and our replica Retro Star Trek Uniform shirts are being made and packaged now, as you read this. My particular fan journey has come full circle, but it never ends. We're working hard on uniforms for Star Trek Beyond while looking forward to the new series. And, I'm wearing the first production sample of our retro uniform shirts to roll off the line.

Not coincidentally, it's green.

Star Trek: The Original Series- Retro Starfleet Uniform Shirts are available to pre-order at www.anovos.com.

]]>

Did you know that if you're reading this story there's a 92.47% chance that you are a Star Trek fan? My name is John Cooley, I'm a Trekkie, and I work for ANOVOS. We make stage-accurate replicas of props and costumes from Star Trek. Over the last couple of months, I've been swapping messages with friends who work for companies like mine --  that live in and around Star Trek. How and when did we become fans? Friends like Ben at Eaglemoss (The Official Starships Collection) or Chris of The Wand Company (The Bluetooth Communicator), and the people in CBS and Paramount like Holly and Dave. You know what we have in common? We all LOVE Star Trek. Every last one of us was a Trekkie first, and someone who works near our favorite thing second. I wonder sometimes if the average fan realizes that almost everyone who works for these companies and so many others -- from someone building a set for the new series, to someone working in the archives -- does it for that same reason, because we love Star Trek so much.

Case in point? Yours truly.

Original Green Shirt

At four years old I already loved watching Star Trek, and one day my Mom gave me a command green Donmoor Star Trek shirt. I lived and played "Landing Party" in that uniform shirt far past the time I outgrew it. I retired it and made a folded, framed display out of it, but never forgot how it felt to look down at my chest and see a Starfleet insignia there. Wearing that shirt made me feel like an actual member of the Enterprise crew, and that was a feeling I was determined to have again.

Star Trek Shirts

So I became really focused on Star Trek's costumes -- especially the uniforms. I learned as much as I could about Star Trek's costumes and their designers. I guess it was how I expressed my fandom. Others collected model ships, and toys, or tried to re-create phasers and communicators, while I was in my Dad's garage making Starfleet insignia pins. Wood, plastic, cardboard, whatever I had at hand using still pictures from old sci-fi fan magazines (like Starlog) for reference. They were crude attempts at best, and the bar had been set really high when I was a kid in that green shirt. From a kid's point of view it looked like it came from the set. The collar was shaped right. It had raglan sleeves, and that insignia patch looked just like Captain Kirk's.

I kept trying.

Anovos Green Shirt

Fan patterns, tailors, seamstresses… I tried a lot of the same costuming choices that Trekkies had before ANOVOS with limited success. Nothing ever felt, or looked, exactly like it was on the screen. Then ANOVOS came along, and suddenly any Star Trek uniform I had ever wanted seemed possible: The Original Series, Next Gen, even The Wrath of Khan. There was only one thing missing. As much as I'd wanted a screen-accurate Starfleet uniform, I'd also always wanted to wear my little green Star Trek shirt again.

As luck – or fate – would have it, I joined ANOVOS in 2013, and almost immediately asked if they'd be interested in re-creating those original Star Trek shirts. You see, they had been the very first officially manufactured Starfleet uniforms ever made, and so, in a way, they were the ancestors of our replica uniforms today. My bosses were skeptical, but only a couple of months after I had joined the company they allowed me to casually run the idea past John Van Citters at CBS Consumer Products. He said it was an interesting idea, and thought that my shirts might be something fun to bring back during the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek. I was reallllly happy, and then realized that was another three years away. Fine. we had work to do to anyway.

Anovos Donmoor Star Trek Shirts

We approached re-creating those first Star Trek shirts like we would any other replica. Between other projects, our Creative Services Manager, Steve Fronzcek, and I compiled as much research as we could. We worked from my original 40-year-old shirts -- I actually had two as a kid (my green one, and a gold shirt) -- and from any surviving materials we could find. We worked hard to match colors and materials as precisely as we could. We even had fabric custom dyed just for these replicas. When we could have just used insignia patches that we already make for our other Original Series uniforms, we instead re-created the original 1975 insignia. And where the original Donmoor shirts only had a command insignia (regardless of department color), we went a step further and made Sciences and Operations emblems in the same style as those old patches. Finally, we handed off our research (and an original shirt) to our Soft Goods Director, Maegen Hensley, who ensured that our recreated shirts were as perfect as they could be while scaling them up for adults.

John Cooley and daughter

So, here we are, its July and our replica Retro Star Trek Uniform shirts are being made and packaged now, as you read this. My particular fan journey has come full circle, but it never ends. We're working hard on uniforms for Star Trek Beyond while looking forward to the new series. And, I'm wearing the first production sample of our retro uniform shirts to roll off the line.

Not coincidentally, it's green.

Star Trek: The Original Series- Retro Starfleet Uniform Shirts are available to pre-order at www.anovos.com.

]]>
fans-love-of-trek-leads-to-command-green-replica-shirt Thu, 21 Jul 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Stars Go Beyond at World Premiere]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/stars-go-beyond-at-world-premiere

If Star Trek is your thing, then San Diego was THE place to be on Wednesday night. Embarcadero Marina Park played host to the world premiere of Star Trek Beyond. And this was no ordinary screening. We're talking IMAX outdoors, on a picture-perfect evening, with the San Diego Symphony performing the score live to screen. We're talking a dazzling pre-screening fireworks and laser display. Conan O'Brien cracked the crowd with a mini-routine and with his introductions of the cast and crew. After the fireworks concluded, he quipped, "Ladies and gentlemen, that was the promotional budget for the film. You won't see another billboard."

Then, one by one the actors, director Justin Lin, and producers J.J. Abrams and Lindsey Weber took the stage and greeted the appreciative audience of several thousand fans. Karl Urban noted that the black Starfleet delta badge he sported was in tribute to Anton Yelchin, who died tragically, and tragically young, last month.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Karl Urban

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Simon Pegg

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - John Cho and Sofia Boutella

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Idris Elba

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Karl Urban and Zoe Saldana

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto and Chris Pine

Zachary Quinto paid tribute to his friend and Spock predecessor, Leonard Nimoy, and recounted sharing the spotlight with Nimoy at Comic-Con in 2007.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto

Abrams shared memories about Yelchin and forcefully said "He should be here tonight," then noted that Yelchin's parents, Irina and Viktor, were in attendance at the screening. Then, at Abrams' request, everyone observed a moment of silence.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - JJ Abrams

Moments later, composer Michael Giacchino discussed his love of Star Trek. He generated huge chuckles when he explained how, on the first day of fifth grade, he wore a Starfleet uniform to school. It was, of course, a red shirt... as illustrated by an old photo that flashed on the screen. And then Lin came out to explain how his parents, after immigrating to the United States, let him watch Star Trek after they closed up their restaurant each night. Years later, receiving a phone call from Abrams to discuss directing Beyond, Lin asked for a day or two to think about it. "It was a call that changed my life," he noted. And, before the lights went dark and the film played, Lin added, "Thanks Mom and Dad for letting me stay up late." And then it was on with the movie. 

But, all of the above was only part of the day's festivities. Thousands of fans enjoyed a variety of pre-screening activities, freebies and a suprise appearance by Star Trek's original Uhura, Nichelle Nichols.

On screens adjacent to the main screen, "The Corbomite Maneuver" played to an enthusiastic response, as did Rihanna's "Sledgehammer" video. There was free ice cream, and giveaways of seat cushions and more.

Star Trek Beyond Premiere Fans

Meanwhile, just outside the enclosed screening area, the stars and filmmakers engaged in pre-screening red carpet festivities, chatting with media from all over the world, including StarTrek.com. 

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto

"These nine years have gone by in like the blink of an eye," Quinto told StarTrek.com. "The nine years have been full of adventure and excitement and incredible opportunities with Star Trek and... I almost said beyond. And it's so exciting to be here on the 50th anniversary, at Comic-Con, where it all began for me, and to be outside for this screening, with a live orchestra, and with all my family and friends. It's really exhilarating, and I'm very proud at this moment to be a part of this franchise."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Michael Giacchino

"I watched Star Trek and loved it as a kid. Never in a million years, as that kid, not in my wildest dreams, did I think I'd get to do what I'm doing here today with the franchise," said Star Trek Beyond composer, Michael Giacchino. "I just feel honored and lucky to follow in the tradition of what came before me and to contribute to the franchise."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Rod Roddenberry

Gene Roddenberry's son, Rod Roddenberry, shared a story about J.J. Abrams' early days working on Star Trek. "He actually asked for our family's blessing, when my mother was still alive. He didn't have to do that, but he did. It was sort of a nice touch, so it's nice to brought in and, on some level, be a part of this. I've heard from people who've seen it say that it's a very Star Trek-esque movie and very Gene Roddenberry-esque. And I'm excited to be a part of that."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Justin Lin

"When we were constructing Beyond, we talked about it being 50 years, and about deconstructing Star Trek and the Federation. The Enterprise is the crew's home, and it felt like ripping it away would be a literal deconstruction. When we're doing it, even in the pre-viz phase, it was pretty emotional," Justin Lin told StarTrek.com. "I think for J.J.'s ship, there was no official blueprint, so we had to kind of build the ship as we were tearing it down. It's hard to describe, but it was just very emotional."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - John Cho

John Cho reflected on his time on Star Trek. "It's weird that it's almost nine years," he said. "I don't know how to process all of it. I know I'm honored. I know it feels like more than a job. And I think it will be a long time before I realize the extent of it. The more fans I meet and the more kinds of fans I meet, from all over the world, it gets deeper and deeper for me. It's wild, but it means a lot to me to be associated with something that brings so much positivity and optimism into the world." 

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Sofia Boutello

One of the newest members of the Star Trek family, Sofia Boutella, shared her experience in becoming Jaylah. "The makeup took a long time, many hours every day. But I couldn't find Jaylah until I had the makeup on. And as soon as I had it on, and my shoes on, because the shoes were very important to me, I felt like the character."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Chris Pine

Chris Pine, the U.S.S. Enterprise's captain, James T. Kirk, talked about the movie's director, Justin Lin. "I was really impressed by Justin's decisiveness," he said. "He came in very late in the game and we needed somebody to make a lot of decisions very quickly and be as much of a general as anything else, and he did that supremely and superbly."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - JJ Abrams

"I will be totally honest with you about (the just-announced fourth Trek film, which will involve George and James Kirk interacting). I haven't been this excited about a specific story for a Star Trek movie that we've worked on before. It's my favorite story we've worked on," J.J. Abrams told StarTrek.com. "Even though I have great affinity for the movies we've done, this story is fantastic. It's one of the reasons I hope people see Beyond, because I so desperately want to make that next movie to be made."

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zoe Saldana

And, during her time talking to StarTrek.com, Saldana became emotional as paid tribute to Yelchin. "This is a bittersweet moment," she said. "It's bittersweet because we are missing a member of our family. It why we're wearing a black pin in his honor. It's for Anton. So, we are all here smiling and celebrating... because we know it's what he would have wanted to do."

Star Trek Beyond opens July 22.

]]>

If Star Trek is your thing, then San Diego was THE place to be on Wednesday night. Embarcadero Marina Park played host to the world premiere of Star Trek Beyond. And this was no ordinary screening. We're talking IMAX outdoors, on a picture-perfect evening, with the San Diego Symphony performing the score live to screen. We're talking a dazzling pre-screening fireworks and laser display. Conan O'Brien cracked the crowd with a mini-routine and with his introductions of the cast and crew. After the fireworks concluded, he quipped, "Ladies and gentlemen, that was the promotional budget for the film. You won't see another billboard."

Then, one by one the actors, director Justin Lin, and producers J.J. Abrams and Lindsey Weber took the stage and greeted the appreciative audience of several thousand fans. Karl Urban noted that the black Starfleet delta badge he sported was in tribute to Anton Yelchin, who died tragically, and tragically young, last month.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Karl Urban

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Simon Pegg

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - John Cho and Sofia Boutella

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Idris Elba

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Karl Urban and Zoe Saldana

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto and Chris Pine

Zachary Quinto paid tribute to his friend and Spock predecessor, Leonard Nimoy, and recounted sharing the spotlight with Nimoy at Comic-Con in 2007.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto

Abrams shared memories about Yelchin and forcefully said "He should be here tonight," then noted that Yelchin's parents, Irina and Viktor, were in attendance at the screening. Then, at Abrams' request, everyone observed a moment of silence.

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - JJ Abrams

Moments later, composer Michael Giacchino discussed his love of Star Trek. He generated huge chuckles when he explained how, on the first day of fifth grade, he wore a Starfleet uniform to school. It was, of course, a red shirt... as illustrated by an old photo that flashed on the screen. And then Lin came out to explain how his parents, after immigrating to the United States, let him watch Star Trek after they closed up their restaurant each night. Years later, receiving a phone call from Abrams to discuss directing Beyond, Lin asked for a day or two to think about it. "It was a call that changed my life," he noted. And, before the lights went dark and the film played, Lin added, "Thanks Mom and Dad for letting me stay up late." And then it was on with the movie. 

But, all of the above was only part of the day's festivities. Thousands of fans enjoyed a variety of pre-screening activities, freebies and a suprise appearance by Star Trek's original Uhura, Nichelle Nichols.

On screens adjacent to the main screen, "The Corbomite Maneuver" played to an enthusiastic response, as did Rihanna's "Sledgehammer" video. There was free ice cream, and giveaways of seat cushions and more.

Star Trek Beyond Premiere Fans

Meanwhile, just outside the enclosed screening area, the stars and filmmakers engaged in pre-screening red carpet festivities, chatting with media from all over the world, including StarTrek.com. 

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zachary Quinto

"These nine years have gone by in like the blink of an eye," Quinto told StarTrek.com. "The nine years have been full of adventure and excitement and incredible opportunities with Star Trek and... I almost said beyond. And it's so exciting to be here on the 50th anniversary, at Comic-Con, where it all began for me, and to be outside for this screening, with a live orchestra, and with all my family and friends. It's really exhilarating, and I'm very proud at this moment to be a part of this franchise."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Michael Giacchino

"I watched Star Trek and loved it as a kid. Never in a million years, as that kid, not in my wildest dreams, did I think I'd get to do what I'm doing here today with the franchise," said Star Trek Beyond composer, Michael Giacchino. "I just feel honored and lucky to follow in the tradition of what came before me and to contribute to the franchise."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Rod Roddenberry

Gene Roddenberry's son, Rod Roddenberry, shared a story about J.J. Abrams' early days working on Star Trek. "He actually asked for our family's blessing, when my mother was still alive. He didn't have to do that, but he did. It was sort of a nice touch, so it's nice to brought in and, on some level, be a part of this. I've heard from people who've seen it say that it's a very Star Trek-esque movie and very Gene Roddenberry-esque. And I'm excited to be a part of that."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Justin Lin

"When we were constructing Beyond, we talked about it being 50 years, and about deconstructing Star Trek and the Federation. The Enterprise is the crew's home, and it felt like ripping it away would be a literal deconstruction. When we're doing it, even in the pre-viz phase, it was pretty emotional," Justin Lin told StarTrek.com. "I think for J.J.'s ship, there was no official blueprint, so we had to kind of build the ship as we were tearing it down. It's hard to describe, but it was just very emotional."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - John Cho

John Cho reflected on his time on Star Trek. "It's weird that it's almost nine years," he said. "I don't know how to process all of it. I know I'm honored. I know it feels like more than a job. And I think it will be a long time before I realize the extent of it. The more fans I meet and the more kinds of fans I meet, from all over the world, it gets deeper and deeper for me. It's wild, but it means a lot to me to be associated with something that brings so much positivity and optimism into the world." 

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Sofia Boutello

One of the newest members of the Star Trek family, Sofia Boutella, shared her experience in becoming Jaylah. "The makeup took a long time, many hours every day. But I couldn't find Jaylah until I had the makeup on. And as soon as I had it on, and my shoes on, because the shoes were very important to me, I felt like the character."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - Chris Pine

Chris Pine, the U.S.S. Enterprise's captain, James T. Kirk, talked about the movie's director, Justin Lin. "I was really impressed by Justin's decisiveness," he said. "He came in very late in the game and we needed somebody to make a lot of decisions very quickly and be as much of a general as anything else, and he did that supremely and superbly."

Star Trek Beyond Premiere - JJ Abrams

"I will be totally honest with you about (the just-announced fourth Trek film, which will involve George and James Kirk interacting). I haven't been this excited about a specific story for a Star Trek movie that we've worked on before. It's my favorite story we've worked on," J.J. Abrams told StarTrek.com. "Even though I have great affinity for the movies we've done, this story is fantastic. It's one of the reasons I hope people see Beyond, because I so desperately want to make that next movie to be made."

Star Trek Beyond World Premiere - Zoe Saldana

And, during her time talking to StarTrek.com, Saldana became emotional as paid tribute to Yelchin. "This is a bittersweet moment," she said. "It's bittersweet because we are missing a member of our family. It why we're wearing a black pin in his honor. It's for Anton. So, we are all here smiling and celebrating... because we know it's what he would have wanted to do."

Star Trek Beyond opens July 22.

]]>
stars-go-beyond-at-world-premiere Thu, 21 Jul 2016 01:40:29 -0700
<![CDATA[Star Trek Starships Sweepstakes Is Underway]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/star-trek-starships-sweepstakes-is-underway

Simon & Schuster and Eaglemoss are teaming up for a Star Trek Starships Sweepstakes that kicks off today and will run through August 12. One Grand Prize Winner will receive 25 hand-painted die-cast collectible ship models from the Eaglemoss Star Trek Official Starships Collection; as well as a copy of the Star Trek: U.S.S. Enterprise Haynes Manual, signed by author Ben Robinson; a copy of the Star Trek: Ships of the Line book; and a $50 gift certificate for the Star Trek Shop here at StarTrek.com.

Ten Runners-Up will receive hand-painted die-cast collectible ship models of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701, the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D and the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E; a copy of the Star Trek: Ships of the Line book; and a $25 gift certificate for the Star Trek Shop.

No purchase is necessary to enter or to win. Go to www.simonandschusterpublishing.com to enter.

]]>

Simon & Schuster and Eaglemoss are teaming up for a Star Trek Starships Sweepstakes that kicks off today and will run through August 12. One Grand Prize Winner will receive 25 hand-painted die-cast collectible ship models from the Eaglemoss Star Trek Official Starships Collection; as well as a copy of the Star Trek: U.S.S. Enterprise Haynes Manual, signed by author Ben Robinson; a copy of the Star Trek: Ships of the Line book; and a $50 gift certificate for the Star Trek Shop here at StarTrek.com.

Ten Runners-Up will receive hand-painted die-cast collectible ship models of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701, the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D and the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E; a copy of the Star Trek: Ships of the Line book; and a $25 gift certificate for the Star Trek Shop.

No purchase is necessary to enter or to win. Go to www.simonandschusterpublishing.com to enter.

]]>
star-trek-starships-sweepstakes-is-underway Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Pine, Elba & More Attend NYC Beyond Premiere]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/pine-elba-more-attend-nyc-beyond-premiere

Chris Pine, Idris Elba and Karl Urban were among the stars who turned out last night for the intimate New York City premiere of Star Trek Beyond. The event, presented by Hewlett Packard Enterprise, took place at the Crosby Street Hotel. Others walking the red carpet or settling in for the screening included Beyond co-star Melissa Roxburgh, Keegan-Michael Key, Outlander star Sam Heughan, model Meki Saldana and James Franco.

StarTrek.com was on the red carpet, snapping photos and grabbing a few comments from some of the guests.

Idris Elba - NYC Premiere

Idris Elba: “It means a lot to me to be in Star Trek movie because I grew up on Star Trek. I shouldn’t say I was a Trekkie or a Trekker, but I definitely watched it a lot as a kid, the TV show. Scotty was my favorite character. And, actually, as I was just getting into acting, I saw them doing the classic shaking that they do on the bridge and thought, “I know how they do this.” But I always really wanted to do it. Now, I’ve done that. And just to be in Star Trek movie, it’s a good thing.”

Sam Heughan: “I know Star Trek pretty well. I was allowed to watch one show a night and Star Trek: The Next Generation would be the show. So I grew up with Patrick Stewart and all of that. Deep Space Nine, I was a big fan, and also the old series. And I’ve become friendly with Bill Shatner. We’ve hung out a bit. That was not, like you’d think, through (Outlander producer) Ron Moore. It was through social media that I met Bill, which is so random. He tweets everything. What does he not tweet?”

Keegan-Michael Key - NYC Premiere

Keegan-Michael Key: “If you’re StarTrek.com, just so I don’t get in trouble, I’m going to say I’m an 8 out of 10 as a Trek fan. My father was a huuuuuuuge Trekkie. He was probably the world’s biggest Uhura fan. My dad had a picture of Nichelle Nichols in our house. And he was a big Spock guy. Star Trek was how he and his brothers and sisters all connected with each other. So it rubbed off on me and my brother. I was a huge fan. Wrath of Khan is one of my top 10 favorite films. You know what? We’ll say 9 out of 10.”

Following the red carpet session, Pine, Urban and Elba greeted the crowd inside the screening room. Pine, microphone in hand, briefly described the experience of making the film and then paid tribute to the late Anton Yelchin. “It’s been a very difficult (press) tour because we recently lost a very good friend of ours, who is in the film, Anton Yelchin,” Pine said. “He was a wonderful actor and a wonderful friend, and it feels so weird to have to go out and sell this film when something way more real happened, like the loss of someone very close. But he was a shining light and you can tell in this film. Every time he comes on screen you want to giggle, because he liked a good giggle. He had a great laugh and he was super-intelligent and vey present and furiously creative. He had so many things going on, it put us all to shame. We will miss him greatly and hopefully you will all love him as much as we do. Thanks so much for coming.”

Star Trek Beyond will open July 22.

]]>

Chris Pine, Idris Elba and Karl Urban were among the stars who turned out last night for the intimate New York City premiere of Star Trek Beyond. The event, presented by Hewlett Packard Enterprise, took place at the Crosby Street Hotel. Others walking the red carpet or settling in for the screening included Beyond co-star Melissa Roxburgh, Keegan-Michael Key, Outlander star Sam Heughan, model Meki Saldana and James Franco.

StarTrek.com was on the red carpet, snapping photos and grabbing a few comments from some of the guests.

Idris Elba - NYC Premiere

Idris Elba: “It means a lot to me to be in Star Trek movie because I grew up on Star Trek. I shouldn’t say I was a Trekkie or a Trekker, but I definitely watched it a lot as a kid, the TV show. Scotty was my favorite character. And, actually, as I was just getting into acting, I saw them doing the classic shaking that they do on the bridge and thought, “I know how they do this.” But I always really wanted to do it. Now, I’ve done that. And just to be in Star Trek movie, it’s a good thing.”

Sam Heughan: “I know Star Trek pretty well. I was allowed to watch one show a night and Star Trek: The Next Generation would be the show. So I grew up with Patrick Stewart and all of that. Deep Space Nine, I was a big fan, and also the old series. And I’ve become friendly with Bill Shatner. We’ve hung out a bit. That was not, like you’d think, through (Outlander producer) Ron Moore. It was through social media that I met Bill, which is so random. He tweets everything. What does he not tweet?”

Keegan-Michael Key - NYC Premiere

Keegan-Michael Key: “If you’re StarTrek.com, just so I don’t get in trouble, I’m going to say I’m an 8 out of 10 as a Trek fan. My father was a huuuuuuuge Trekkie. He was probably the world’s biggest Uhura fan. My dad had a picture of Nichelle Nichols in our house. And he was a big Spock guy. Star Trek was how he and his brothers and sisters all connected with each other. So it rubbed off on me and my brother. I was a huge fan. Wrath of Khan is one of my top 10 favorite films. You know what? We’ll say 9 out of 10.”

Following the red carpet session, Pine, Urban and Elba greeted the crowd inside the screening room. Pine, microphone in hand, briefly described the experience of making the film and then paid tribute to the late Anton Yelchin. “It’s been a very difficult (press) tour because we recently lost a very good friend of ours, who is in the film, Anton Yelchin,” Pine said. “He was a wonderful actor and a wonderful friend, and it feels so weird to have to go out and sell this film when something way more real happened, like the loss of someone very close. But he was a shining light and you can tell in this film. Every time he comes on screen you want to giggle, because he liked a good giggle. He had a great laugh and he was super-intelligent and vey present and furiously creative. He had so many things going on, it put us all to shame. We will miss him greatly and hopefully you will all love him as much as we do. Thanks so much for coming.”

Star Trek Beyond will open July 22.

]]>
pine-elba-more-attend-nyc-beyond-premiere Tue, 19 Jul 2016 15:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Mission New York Adds Cosplay Judges ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mission-new-york-adds-cosplay-judges

Star Trek: Mission New York has announced that Fashion It So bloggers Anna Marquardt and Charlie Beckerman will serve as the event's cosplay contest judges. Further, they've issued a call to fans to vote for their favorite episodes and announced that tickets purchased by August 5 will be sent directly to fans.

Fashion It So

A three-day event, presented by CBS Consumer Products and ReedPop, ST:MNY will take place September 2-4, 2016, in Manhattan. ST:MNY will offer fans a mix of celebrity guests, real-world science figures, presentations, interactive exhibits, screenings, exclusive merchandise and more. Trek guests announced so far include William Shatner, Peter Weller, Alice Eve, Karl Urban, Brannon Braga, Walter Koenig, Jonathan Frakes, Marina Sirtis, LeVar Burton, Terry Farrell, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden, Bruce Greenwood, Nana Visitor, Rene Auberjonois, Armin Shimerman, Cirroc Lofton, Anthony Montgomery, Connor Trinneer, John Billingsley, Dominic Keating, Robin Curtis, Eugene "Rod" Roddenberry, Dan Werthimer and Phil "The Bad Astronomer" Plait. They will all be on hand for talks, autographs and photo opportunities.

Werthimer is one of the real-world science guests, following Jeff Volosin (NASA TESS Project Manager at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) and Matt Ritsko (NASA TESS Deputy Project Manager for Resources at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center). Also on tap, as previously revealed: Hallmark will showcase their exhibitor exclusives and the FanBros, a/k/a the voice of the urban geek, will be in the house.

Adult and kids tickets are available now at pre-show prices, and they'll be sold by day and as part of a three-day specially priced package. Further information about ST:MNY – including additional guest announcements, hotel information and exhibitors – will be revealed in the coming weeks.

Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for ongoing coverage, and also be sure to visit www.StarTrekMissions.com and the Star Trek: Mission New York social media pages (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram).

]]>

Star Trek: Mission New York has announced that Fashion It So bloggers Anna Marquardt and Charlie Beckerman will serve as the event's cosplay contest judges. Further, they've issued a call to fans to vote for their favorite episodes and announced that tickets purchased by August 5 will be sent directly to fans.

Fashion It So

A three-day event, presented by CBS Consumer Products and ReedPop, ST:MNY will take place September 2-4, 2016, in Manhattan. ST:MNY will offer fans a mix of celebrity guests, real-world science figures, presentations, interactive exhibits, screenings, exclusive merchandise and more. Trek guests announced so far include William Shatner, Peter Weller, Alice Eve, Karl Urban, Brannon Braga, Walter Koenig, Jonathan Frakes, Marina Sirtis, LeVar Burton, Terry Farrell, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden, Bruce Greenwood, Nana Visitor, Rene Auberjonois, Armin Shimerman, Cirroc Lofton, Anthony Montgomery, Connor Trinneer, John Billingsley, Dominic Keating, Robin Curtis, Eugene "Rod" Roddenberry, Dan Werthimer and Phil "The Bad Astronomer" Plait. They will all be on hand for talks, autographs and photo opportunities.

Werthimer is one of the real-world science guests, following Jeff Volosin (NASA TESS Project Manager at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) and Matt Ritsko (NASA TESS Deputy Project Manager for Resources at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center). Also on tap, as previously revealed: Hallmark will showcase their exhibitor exclusives and the FanBros, a/k/a the voice of the urban geek, will be in the house.

Adult and kids tickets are available now at pre-show prices, and they'll be sold by day and as part of a three-day specially priced package. Further information about ST:MNY – including additional guest announcements, hotel information and exhibitors – will be revealed in the coming weeks.

Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for ongoing coverage, and also be sure to visit www.StarTrekMissions.com and the Star Trek: Mission New York social media pages (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram).

]]>
mission-new-york-adds-cosplay-judges Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:56:09 -0700
<![CDATA[Boldly Go Comic Book Series Coming This Fall ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/boldly-go-comic-book-series-coming-this-fall

IDW Publishing, in October, will launch Star Trek: Boldly Go, a new Star Trek comic book series that reunites the esteemed writer-artist tandem of Mike Johnson and Tony Shasteen, and unfolds following the events of Star Trek Beyond. As readers know, Johnson wrote most of the 60 universe-expanding installments in IDW's current Star Trek series.

Star Trek: Boldly Go

Here's the teaser graph about Boldly Go from IDW: Chronicling the adventures of Captain Kirk and his iconic crew, a danger unlike anything the Federation has faced before threatens our heroes as they explore new worlds and encounter new species. All that plus brand-new uniforms for the crew.

Star Trek: Boldly Go

“What better way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star Trek?” asks Star Trek editor Sarah Gaydos. “And what better team to do it with? Mike and Tony are poised to take the series in such an exciting direction. I can't wait to introduce the world to these new characters... as well as some interesting friends and foes from the past.”

Star Trek: Boldly Go

Star Trek: Boldly Go will arrive in comic shops this October and will feature character-focused connecting subscriptions variant covers by Shasteen. Additional details coming soon.

]]>

IDW Publishing, in October, will launch Star Trek: Boldly Go, a new Star Trek comic book series that reunites the esteemed writer-artist tandem of Mike Johnson and Tony Shasteen, and unfolds following the events of Star Trek Beyond. As readers know, Johnson wrote most of the 60 universe-expanding installments in IDW's current Star Trek series.

Star Trek: Boldly Go

Here's the teaser graph about Boldly Go from IDW: Chronicling the adventures of Captain Kirk and his iconic crew, a danger unlike anything the Federation has faced before threatens our heroes as they explore new worlds and encounter new species. All that plus brand-new uniforms for the crew.

Star Trek: Boldly Go

“What better way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star Trek?” asks Star Trek editor Sarah Gaydos. “And what better team to do it with? Mike and Tony are poised to take the series in such an exciting direction. I can't wait to introduce the world to these new characters... as well as some interesting friends and foes from the past.”

Star Trek: Boldly Go

Star Trek: Boldly Go will arrive in comic shops this October and will feature character-focused connecting subscriptions variant covers by Shasteen. Additional details coming soon.

]]>
boldly-go-comic-book-series-coming-this-fall Tue, 19 Jul 2016 06:51:12 -0700
<![CDATA[Mayim Bialik Visits The Final Frontier]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mayim-bialik-visits-the-final-frontier

Mayim Bialik, longtime Star Trek fan and co-star of The Big Bang Theory, graces the cover and several inside pages of the August issue of CBS Watch! magazine. The actress appears in the magazine dressed in uniform as Janice Rand and Data, as well as other characters, and posing with Tribbles and alongside the Gorn, among other set-ups. It was all part of Bialik's contribution to the Star Trek. 50 Artists. 50 years. global art exhibition.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Mayim Bialik

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Also, in an exclusive behind-the-scenes video, Bialik talks about the shoot and her love of Star Trek. She calls The Original Series "iconic" and notes that "to get to embody that is really spectacular." And, recalling her most potent Trek memory, that involved experiencing "fear and terror" from watching the Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan sequence in which Khan placed Ceti eels in the ears of Chekov and Captain Terrell.

Keep an eye on magazine racks for CBS Watch! or go to www.palmcoast.com to subscribe.

]]>

Mayim Bialik, longtime Star Trek fan and co-star of The Big Bang Theory, graces the cover and several inside pages of the August issue of CBS Watch! magazine. The actress appears in the magazine dressed in uniform as Janice Rand and Data, as well as other characters, and posing with Tribbles and alongside the Gorn, among other set-ups. It was all part of Bialik's contribution to the Star Trek. 50 Artists. 50 years. global art exhibition.

Star Trek 50 Artists. 50 Years. Mayim Bialik

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Mayim Bialik Star Trek

Also, in an exclusive behind-the-scenes video, Bialik talks about the shoot and her love of Star Trek. She calls The Original Series "iconic" and notes that "to get to embody that is really spectacular." And, recalling her most potent Trek memory, that involved experiencing "fear and terror" from watching the Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan sequence in which Khan placed Ceti eels in the ears of Chekov and Captain Terrell.

Keep an eye on magazine racks for CBS Watch! or go to www.palmcoast.com to subscribe.

]]>
mayim-bialik-visits-the-final-frontier Mon, 18 Jul 2016 17:29:22 -0700
<![CDATA[Fourth Star Trek Feature Confirmed ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/fourth-star-trek-feature-confirmed

It's official. Paramount Pictures, in conjunction with Skydance and Bad Robot, have greenlit a fourth Star Trek featuring the current crew of the starship Enterprise. According to a press release issued today by Paramount, "In the next installment of the epic space adventure, Chris Pine’s Captain Kirk will cross paths with a man he never had a chance to meet, but whose legacy has haunted him since the day he was born: his father." And, yes, Chris Hemsworth is on board to reprise the role of George Kirk, whom he first portrayed in Star Trek (2009).

 Chris Hemsworth

In addition to Pine, the rest of the cast is expected to return. Though the release does not touch on it, producer J.J. Abrams has publicly stated that the role of Chekov, essayed by Anton Yelchin in Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness and July 22's Star Trek Beyond, will not be recast.

Star Trek 2009 Cast

J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay will write the screenplay. Abrams and Lindsey Weber will produce through Bad Robot Productions, while David Ellison and Dana Goldberg of Skydance will executive produce.

]]>

It's official. Paramount Pictures, in conjunction with Skydance and Bad Robot, have greenlit a fourth Star Trek featuring the current crew of the starship Enterprise. According to a press release issued today by Paramount, "In the next installment of the epic space adventure, Chris Pine’s Captain Kirk will cross paths with a man he never had a chance to meet, but whose legacy has haunted him since the day he was born: his father." And, yes, Chris Hemsworth is on board to reprise the role of George Kirk, whom he first portrayed in Star Trek (2009).

 Chris Hemsworth

In addition to Pine, the rest of the cast is expected to return. Though the release does not touch on it, producer J.J. Abrams has publicly stated that the role of Chekov, essayed by Anton Yelchin in Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness and July 22's Star Trek Beyond, will not be recast.

Star Trek 2009 Cast

J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay will write the screenplay. Abrams and Lindsey Weber will produce through Bad Robot Productions, while David Ellison and Dana Goldberg of Skydance will executive produce.

]]>
fourth-star-trek-feature-confirmed Mon, 18 Jul 2016 13:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Catching Up with Khan's Peter Preston, Iake Eissinmann ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-khans-peter-preston-iake-eissinmann

Countless television viewers and moviegoers grew up with Ike Eissenmann, who, these days, goes by his real name, Iake Eissinmann. For the better part of two decades -- the 1970s and 1980s --, Eissinmann guest starred on show after show and acted in movie after movie. His credits range from Mannix, Gunsmoke, The Fantastic Journey, CHiPS, Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color and Wonder Woman to The Formula, T.J. Hooker, Cross Creek, Dino-Riders, Tom & Huck and Howl's Moving Castle. He's best known, however, for his roles as Tony in Escape to Witch Mountain and Escape from Witch Mountain (and a cameo in Return to Witch Mountain), as well as Peter Preston in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Eissinmann, who lives in Florida, still cherishes his time as an actor and occasionally attends autograph shows and conventions. He'll be on hand next month as a guest at Star Trek Las Vegas, to be held August 3-7 at the Rio Suites Hotel & Casino. In advance of that appearance, during which he'll talk on stage, sign autographs and participate in photo ops, Eissinmann agreed to chat with StarTrek.com about his life, career and Trek experiences. Here's what he had to say.

What's life like for you these days?

Well, I’ve actually been spending my time working on a memoir about my experiences at Disney making Escape to Witch Mountain, and the subsequent projects I worked on there. Kind of a long time coming project, I have been letting it percolate for any number of years, and then I finally decided to sit down and approach it. So that’s very much what I’m doing now. I’m attending a number of occasions. I did Chiller last year and the Hollywood Show in Los Angeles, and Fanboy Expo at Lakeland, Florida, and that’s been kind of a more recent thing, doing the autograph shows and the con events. They are absolute blasts. I first got involved with them probably a good 20 years ago before the whole, big, massive rage caught on for all of these conventions, and had a big lag of time between first doing them and doing them again. So it’s been a lot of fun.

I’m in a fortunate position that I’ve built a career in the industry as a working actor, and I have a residual income that takes very good care of me. So that’s the bottom line as far as that’s concerned. I entered in a very little known area of television and film production during its embryonic stages, and then its heyday. It was called looping or ADR, which was custom background voice sound effects for film and TV shows, and I was a partner in a long-running group called the L.A. Mad Dogs, and I worked on upwards of 500-600 films and TV shows. I occasionally receive individual credit for those things, but not all the time. That was something that was an incredible amount of fun. I did it for maybe 15 or 20 years, so imagine your residual check multiplied hundreds of times over for various titles and levels of success. It creates a nice little base income for me to pursue other things that are of interest, and gives me time to have some fun, too.

You mentioned your convention appearances. You'll be in Vegas next month for Star Trek Las Vegas. Can you talk about how you enjoy those experiences?

I absolutely love it. It’s so much fun to hear everyone’s individual experiences, the things they like the most, and there’s a lot of consistency as far as that is concerned. But just to engage with the fans, period, is something I’ve always enjoyed. Like I mentioned, I did my first convention quite a long time ago, before they became these very well organized and celebrity-entrenched events. I had been warned by people with this certain amount of trepidation about the Trekkies and the Trek fans, and what they were like, and just, “Take care in how you deal with them.” I thought, “What am I getting into?” And I found out that the original blossoming of the Trek fans that exploded so amazingly, they were an incredible group of people that had a fantastic common interest that was massive, and they’re just great people. You also tend to find out the fans are a bit more general in their interests, but I’m sure at this event, obviously, people are going there for Star Trek, and especially this 50th anniversary, which I am super-excited about.

They are going to be primarily Star Trek fans, but they have this crossover recognition that I get for Escape to Witch Mountain. And actually there is a TV series I did back in the mid-70’s that I’m not sure if you are aware of called Fantastic Journey. I get a mixture of all of those people, and then kind of peppered in all of that they will bring up some of the most random titles I did when I was a young actor. They’ll say, “That was one of my favorites, too!” So it’s great fun for me, because I really do enjoy it. I’m old enough to go back to the days when one got actual fan mail in the mail, and it was very hard to write back to people and have a meaningful engagement with them. And now we can do it face to face, and that’s a whole lot more fun for me.

Let's go back to The Wrath of Khan. What, if anything, did you know about Star Trek before Wrath of Khan came along?

I can legitimately say I was a big fan of The Original Series. And by the time the first Star Trek film came out, I was excited to see it, because the series was available to watch. I hope I’m not mistaking the timeline here, but I think there was VHS available perhaps at the time, and it would run on cable or syndication. I was able to tape the shows and watch them at my leisure. I wouldn’t say I was a diehard Trekkie, but I really enjoyed and appreciated the show. So there was a fondness about it that I had, and when the first film came out I could not have been more excited. I watched it with great enthusiasm, and I enjoyed it. I still like it. I know it’s a sore spot for fans for many reasons, but my personal taste in science fiction is a little darker, a little bit more serious, and just the tone of it really appealed to me personally. I was upset that it didn’t come off well or do as well as everyone had hoped.

How did you land the part in Wrath of Khan?

When the rumors in the industry came out about a sequel, I just thought, “Wow, I can’t tell you how great it would be for me to be in something Star Trek.” And lo and behold, I get a random phone call from my agent saying, “You have an interview with Paramount for Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan.” I was beside myself with excitement. And given the fact that I was a working actor through all of those years, it was how I made my living, and every job was necessary for me to pay my bills, some jobs obviously become more important than others. I knew it was a small part. I did not care, and I was just absolutely as motivated as I could be to do the best job that I could.

As an actor at the time, and I’m sure it still happens now, but you could get a little piece of the script that you needed to audition for ahead of time so you could prepare. I just prepared the heck out of it, and went in and busted my butt in my audition to make sure I did the best I could. There was really no way of knowing exactly what they were looking for. The part is clearly what it was, young cadet in a pseudo-military situation, and I just poured that on as best I could. Like every actor, you have no idea how well you did. And there were a few people in the room, including the casting person. I don’t know if Nick Meyer, the director was there. I don’t believe he was there for the first audition because I had a callback, and the callback I felt like, “OK, I clearly have a very, very good chance of getting this.” So I had a bit more feeling of security going in, and I think Nick might have been there for the callback, but I had no idea who he was. So I went into the callback, again poured myself into it, fingers crossed, and then found out a few days later that I got the part, and I was just thrilled.

What do you remember of the shoot?

A lot of things stand out for obvious and maybe not so obvious reasons. The two projects I’ve done that I personally have watched the most number of times are Escape to Witch Mountain and Wrath of Khan, because I enjoy those films. Again, I’m a Trek fan, I thought it was a great Star Trek film, and a great film just standing on its own. So when you’ve worked on something and then you continue to see it over and over and over again, a lot of things remain fresh in your memory. It was extraordinary to meet the entire original crew, however briefly. I would say, for me personally, Leonard Nimoy was the person I was the most excited to meet, and I was only in a couple of brief scenes with him. We didn’t really engage very much on set. He tended to be, from my experience, a little bit more internal and Spock-like when he was on set, so he was standoffish, but not in an offensive way; it was just part of the job. But if there was anything I understood about actors is that we all have our own way of doing our job, and that should be respected. I just didn’t have enough interaction with him to get a sense of who he was as a person, and of course I know from everything I’ve read and experienced afterwards that he really was a lovely and incredible person. So just having a chance to meet him and the other original crew members was fantastic.

One of the things that really stood out for me was Kirstie Alley, because she and I had some time to hang out and talk together. The way the production was set up, we had two sound stages, the sound stage we were working on, and the sound stage next door to it where all of our dressing rooms were, and areas in which we could just relax, have coffee, eat, snack or hang out. And so everyone who wasn’t working was on that stage, and we had a lot of time to just chat. She came off to me as just absolutely one of the funniest people I’d ever met. Here she was playing this Vulcan character who was so serious and so lacking in emotion, and it was in such contrast to who she was as a person, that I was, first of all, a bit surprised she got the part. Clearly, she did a good job because that was why she was there, but all I could see at the time was this amazing comedic talent that, for me, it was wonderful to watch that explode and evolve and turn into the amazing performer that she’s been for all this time. That was very evident in meeting her at the time.

What was it like to get all burned and bloodied-up, and then carried onto the bridge by James Doohan?

I was as excited about having a death scene as I was about being in Star Trek, because I’d never died before. I never knew what it was like. So here it was, this chance that came up. Yeah, it was an emotional scene to play to begin with. Death scenes especially, if you are dead on camera for any length of time, have their own issues when it comes to not moving and holding one’s breath, and doing that underneath a highly metallic, reflective surface like the thermal blanket that was pulled over my head was a challenge. And to not move for the entire master shot… I almost made it through.

But the make up in and of itself was a whole other thing. They used this new experimental stuff that was gelatin-based. It had not been used before, and it had a very specific look. It was used on all of us, including Ricardo Montalban and the other supporting cast members that got burned, hurt or injured. It had a fantastic look, but it took a very long time to put on. It was like about a two and a half to three-hour process to apply this stuff to me for my scene. And because of the way shooting happens, when you’re in your makeup or whatever set up you’re in at the time, you’re in that for the entire day, if not multiple days. So, one aspect of this product that they used was that it had this tendency to shrink slowly over the course of many, many hours. And I had it applied to me on the entire side of my torso, on half of my face, my neck, my shoulder. But by the time I was in that for six, eight, or nine hours, I felt like I was in this shrink wrap, and it started to just drive me crazy. And you don’t realize when something comes on that slowly how it’s affecting your attitude, and I just started getting grumpy at the end of the day, and I didn’t know why. I finally realized it was this makeup that was doing this to me. It was so bizarre.

Taking it off took practically as long as it took to put on. I had to get in a hot shower, and it took about 40, 45 minutes to wash all of this stuff off. And then get ready to do it the next day. So there was that part of it. So these things come into play, of course, that you don’t notice on screen because our job is to get up there and pretend that we’re in the space that we’re in. And it was just awesome to have an opportunity to have a moment like that with William Shatner, and to have the scene be such a powerful thing in the film, and for fans as well. The predecessor to that moment is something people also ask me about a lot, whether James Doohan was actually holding me in the elevator on the bridge, or not. And I am happy to say, for his sake, that he actually did carry me. He was holding me right there in the shot, and it was not easy for him to do, because I had to play a practically dead, limp body in his arms, and we worked together as best we could to make it look natural and real, but to his credit he actually pulled it off quite well.

Your character's arc as we see it on screen is still powerful, but at what point did you discover that the Peter-Scotty connection was dropped, and how surprised/disappointed were you by that?

I was supremely shocked. I’d gone to see the film in its initial release, of course, when it came out, but at the time I was shooting a film in Florida called Cross Creek, and in flying back I stopped over in Dallas, Ft. Worth to visit my family, my cousins, and aunt and uncle, we all thought of course it’d be great fun to go see the movie together. So that was the first time I was going to get to see it. I was really excited, and I told them all about it, and we’re all sitting in the theater together. The film runs, and I just went, “Where did the scene go? What happened?” It was bizarre to me, because the bit of information that is exchanged in that moment of course explains my character’s relationship to the Scotty and why it’s so meaningful to him, and so emotional for him, to have lost Peter Preston in the attack. It left people with all kinds of bizarre questions, and the fans out there who could dig into and find out information at the time without the luxury of the internet was incredible. Many people knew what the true storyline was and were outraged over that edit, and to this day it has never been explained why. No producer has been able to say why that was important to them. Even Nick Meyer mentions it in his book, A View from the Bridge. He mentions it, actually, on the commentary on the director’s cut Blu-Ray, and a number of other occasions.

It’s just one of those bizarre things that made absolutely no sense. So, yeah, it was extremely disappointing to me on many levels. I had a small part to begin with, but substantial, and then it was cut even shorter, and it made no sense. I had never been cut that much out of anything other than The Formula. So it was very disappointing and, of course, I was very happy when the special edition came out on television. I think the first television screening of it they had put the scene back in, and so all of the fans were very happy to see that, and to know that a version of the film existed that way. It’s just funny to think that for me such a minor character would be so impactful to everyone, that I wasn’t there, that I was there, you know? It’s made the whole experience that much more rewarding for me, that even being cut out of something impacted the fans as much as being put back in. So it has its own little paradox there.

Not long after Wrath of Khan, you guest starred on T.J. Hooker. Was that just a random coincidence, or did Shatner have something to do with it? Did he remember you?

Random coincidence, absolutely. Again, I was a working actor, it was another job that came up. And I thought, “Oh wow, how fun, I’ll get to work with Mr. Shatner again.” Star Trek, it was very James T. Kirk as much as he could be all of the time. And so on set he was very foreboding, and would remain in character most of the time. So my interactions with him were still very professional in that sense, but I never saw that affable, great sense of humor person that he can be to such great effect. So I was a little nervous about going on to a show that was very much his show, as opposed to being the primary leading man character. It was fantastic to get to work with him in that capacity on T.J. Hooker. It was still a serious show, but it had its lighter moments. He was really absolutely delightful to work with, on both of them for different reasons.

Star Trek is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. What does it mean to you, via your one brief, but memorable contribution, to be a part of the Trek phenomenon?

It’s hard to describe, because it means so much to me to have that. Also having Escape to Witch Mountain, I bring the two together because Disney fans are special fans, Star Trek fans are special fans, and having been a part of such iconic titles... Escape to Witch Mountain is such a special film to millions of people, and to this day it’s so meaningful that it’s been passed down to other generations of younger people who enjoy it as well. The same thing with Star Trek; it picks up generations of new fans, and they go back and re-experience the episodes and the entire universe, pardon the pun, of Star Trek. One of the things I think is so fascinating about it is that technology was such a critical component to The Original Series, along with the stories and ideas. And technology has allowed it to expand and grow and survive and continue to be a part of this entertainment giant that it is. Because if it wasn’t for the internet, if it wasn’t for digital media and all these other incredible things that we have now, we wouldn’t be able to enjoy it in the ways we do now, and have it live on in this way. So that’s something I find fascinating. And just having a chance to be part of Star Trek, as I said, prior to that audition that was always something I wanted to do. Then I had a chance to do it, and to have it continue to be so important to the fans is… words just can’t say it. It’s really been a heartwarming experience, and it’s something I’ve grown to enjoy even more as time goes by. So I’m very grateful for it.

Go to www.Creationent.com for additional details about Star Trek Las Vegas - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/talking-to-tos-enterprise-guest-jack-donner#sthash.wboZlNgu.dpuf

Go to www.creationent.com for additional details about Star Trek Las Vegas.

]]>

Countless television viewers and moviegoers grew up with Ike Eissenmann, who, these days, goes by his real name, Iake Eissinmann. For the better part of two decades -- the 1970s and 1980s --, Eissinmann guest starred on show after show and acted in movie after movie. His credits range from Mannix, Gunsmoke, The Fantastic Journey, CHiPS, Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color and Wonder Woman to The Formula, T.J. Hooker, Cross Creek, Dino-Riders, Tom & Huck and Howl's Moving Castle. He's best known, however, for his roles as Tony in Escape to Witch Mountain and Escape from Witch Mountain (and a cameo in Return to Witch Mountain), as well as Peter Preston in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Eissinmann, who lives in Florida, still cherishes his time as an actor and occasionally attends autograph shows and conventions. He'll be on hand next month as a guest at Star Trek Las Vegas, to be held August 3-7 at the Rio Suites Hotel & Casino. In advance of that appearance, during which he'll talk on stage, sign autographs and participate in photo ops, Eissinmann agreed to chat with StarTrek.com about his life, career and Trek experiences. Here's what he had to say.

What's life like for you these days?

Well, I’ve actually been spending my time working on a memoir about my experiences at Disney making Escape to Witch Mountain, and the subsequent projects I worked on there. Kind of a long time coming project, I have been letting it percolate for any number of years, and then I finally decided to sit down and approach it. So that’s very much what I’m doing now. I’m attending a number of occasions. I did Chiller last year and the Hollywood Show in Los Angeles, and Fanboy Expo at Lakeland, Florida, and that’s been kind of a more recent thing, doing the autograph shows and the con events. They are absolute blasts. I first got involved with them probably a good 20 years ago before the whole, big, massive rage caught on for all of these conventions, and had a big lag of time between first doing them and doing them again. So it’s been a lot of fun.

I’m in a fortunate position that I’ve built a career in the industry as a working actor, and I have a residual income that takes very good care of me. So that’s the bottom line as far as that’s concerned. I entered in a very little known area of television and film production during its embryonic stages, and then its heyday. It was called looping or ADR, which was custom background voice sound effects for film and TV shows, and I was a partner in a long-running group called the L.A. Mad Dogs, and I worked on upwards of 500-600 films and TV shows. I occasionally receive individual credit for those things, but not all the time. That was something that was an incredible amount of fun. I did it for maybe 15 or 20 years, so imagine your residual check multiplied hundreds of times over for various titles and levels of success. It creates a nice little base income for me to pursue other things that are of interest, and gives me time to have some fun, too.

You mentioned your convention appearances. You'll be in Vegas next month for Star Trek Las Vegas. Can you talk about how you enjoy those experiences?

I absolutely love it. It’s so much fun to hear everyone’s individual experiences, the things they like the most, and there’s a lot of consistency as far as that is concerned. But just to engage with the fans, period, is something I’ve always enjoyed. Like I mentioned, I did my first convention quite a long time ago, before they became these very well organized and celebrity-entrenched events. I had been warned by people with this certain amount of trepidation about the Trekkies and the Trek fans, and what they were like, and just, “Take care in how you deal with them.” I thought, “What am I getting into?” And I found out that the original blossoming of the Trek fans that exploded so amazingly, they were an incredible group of people that had a fantastic common interest that was massive, and they’re just great people. You also tend to find out the fans are a bit more general in their interests, but I’m sure at this event, obviously, people are going there for Star Trek, and especially this 50th anniversary, which I am super-excited about.

They are going to be primarily Star Trek fans, but they have this crossover recognition that I get for Escape to Witch Mountain. And actually there is a TV series I did back in the mid-70’s that I’m not sure if you are aware of called Fantastic Journey. I get a mixture of all of those people, and then kind of peppered in all of that they will bring up some of the most random titles I did when I was a young actor. They’ll say, “That was one of my favorites, too!” So it’s great fun for me, because I really do enjoy it. I’m old enough to go back to the days when one got actual fan mail in the mail, and it was very hard to write back to people and have a meaningful engagement with them. And now we can do it face to face, and that’s a whole lot more fun for me.

Let's go back to The Wrath of Khan. What, if anything, did you know about Star Trek before Wrath of Khan came along?

I can legitimately say I was a big fan of The Original Series. And by the time the first Star Trek film came out, I was excited to see it, because the series was available to watch. I hope I’m not mistaking the timeline here, but I think there was VHS available perhaps at the time, and it would run on cable or syndication. I was able to tape the shows and watch them at my leisure. I wouldn’t say I was a diehard Trekkie, but I really enjoyed and appreciated the show. So there was a fondness about it that I had, and when the first film came out I could not have been more excited. I watched it with great enthusiasm, and I enjoyed it. I still like it. I know it’s a sore spot for fans for many reasons, but my personal taste in science fiction is a little darker, a little bit more serious, and just the tone of it really appealed to me personally. I was upset that it didn’t come off well or do as well as everyone had hoped.

How did you land the part in Wrath of Khan?

When the rumors in the industry came out about a sequel, I just thought, “Wow, I can’t tell you how great it would be for me to be in something Star Trek.” And lo and behold, I get a random phone call from my agent saying, “You have an interview with Paramount for Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan.” I was beside myself with excitement. And given the fact that I was a working actor through all of those years, it was how I made my living, and every job was necessary for me to pay my bills, some jobs obviously become more important than others. I knew it was a small part. I did not care, and I was just absolutely as motivated as I could be to do the best job that I could.

As an actor at the time, and I’m sure it still happens now, but you could get a little piece of the script that you needed to audition for ahead of time so you could prepare. I just prepared the heck out of it, and went in and busted my butt in my audition to make sure I did the best I could. There was really no way of knowing exactly what they were looking for. The part is clearly what it was, young cadet in a pseudo-military situation, and I just poured that on as best I could. Like every actor, you have no idea how well you did. And there were a few people in the room, including the casting person. I don’t know if Nick Meyer, the director was there. I don’t believe he was there for the first audition because I had a callback, and the callback I felt like, “OK, I clearly have a very, very good chance of getting this.” So I had a bit more feeling of security going in, and I think Nick might have been there for the callback, but I had no idea who he was. So I went into the callback, again poured myself into it, fingers crossed, and then found out a few days later that I got the part, and I was just thrilled.

What do you remember of the shoot?

A lot of things stand out for obvious and maybe not so obvious reasons. The two projects I’ve done that I personally have watched the most number of times are Escape to Witch Mountain and Wrath of Khan, because I enjoy those films. Again, I’m a Trek fan, I thought it was a great Star Trek film, and a great film just standing on its own. So when you’ve worked on something and then you continue to see it over and over and over again, a lot of things remain fresh in your memory. It was extraordinary to meet the entire original crew, however briefly. I would say, for me personally, Leonard Nimoy was the person I was the most excited to meet, and I was only in a couple of brief scenes with him. We didn’t really engage very much on set. He tended to be, from my experience, a little bit more internal and Spock-like when he was on set, so he was standoffish, but not in an offensive way; it was just part of the job. But if there was anything I understood about actors is that we all have our own way of doing our job, and that should be respected. I just didn’t have enough interaction with him to get a sense of who he was as a person, and of course I know from everything I’ve read and experienced afterwards that he really was a lovely and incredible person. So just having a chance to meet him and the other original crew members was fantastic.

One of the things that really stood out for me was Kirstie Alley, because she and I had some time to hang out and talk together. The way the production was set up, we had two sound stages, the sound stage we were working on, and the sound stage next door to it where all of our dressing rooms were, and areas in which we could just relax, have coffee, eat, snack or hang out. And so everyone who wasn’t working was on that stage, and we had a lot of time to just chat. She came off to me as just absolutely one of the funniest people I’d ever met. Here she was playing this Vulcan character who was so serious and so lacking in emotion, and it was in such contrast to who she was as a person, that I was, first of all, a bit surprised she got the part. Clearly, she did a good job because that was why she was there, but all I could see at the time was this amazing comedic talent that, for me, it was wonderful to watch that explode and evolve and turn into the amazing performer that she’s been for all this time. That was very evident in meeting her at the time.

What was it like to get all burned and bloodied-up, and then carried onto the bridge by James Doohan?

I was as excited about having a death scene as I was about being in Star Trek, because I’d never died before. I never knew what it was like. So here it was, this chance that came up. Yeah, it was an emotional scene to play to begin with. Death scenes especially, if you are dead on camera for any length of time, have their own issues when it comes to not moving and holding one’s breath, and doing that underneath a highly metallic, reflective surface like the thermal blanket that was pulled over my head was a challenge. And to not move for the entire master shot… I almost made it through.

But the make up in and of itself was a whole other thing. They used this new experimental stuff that was gelatin-based. It had not been used before, and it had a very specific look. It was used on all of us, including Ricardo Montalban and the other supporting cast members that got burned, hurt or injured. It had a fantastic look, but it took a very long time to put on. It was like about a two and a half to three-hour process to apply this stuff to me for my scene. And because of the way shooting happens, when you’re in your makeup or whatever set up you’re in at the time, you’re in that for the entire day, if not multiple days. So, one aspect of this product that they used was that it had this tendency to shrink slowly over the course of many, many hours. And I had it applied to me on the entire side of my torso, on half of my face, my neck, my shoulder. But by the time I was in that for six, eight, or nine hours, I felt like I was in this shrink wrap, and it started to just drive me crazy. And you don’t realize when something comes on that slowly how it’s affecting your attitude, and I just started getting grumpy at the end of the day, and I didn’t know why. I finally realized it was this makeup that was doing this to me. It was so bizarre.

Taking it off took practically as long as it took to put on. I had to get in a hot shower, and it took about 40, 45 minutes to wash all of this stuff off. And then get ready to do it the next day. So there was that part of it. So these things come into play, of course, that you don’t notice on screen because our job is to get up there and pretend that we’re in the space that we’re in. And it was just awesome to have an opportunity to have a moment like that with William Shatner, and to have the scene be such a powerful thing in the film, and for fans as well. The predecessor to that moment is something people also ask me about a lot, whether James Doohan was actually holding me in the elevator on the bridge, or not. And I am happy to say, for his sake, that he actually did carry me. He was holding me right there in the shot, and it was not easy for him to do, because I had to play a practically dead, limp body in his arms, and we worked together as best we could to make it look natural and real, but to his credit he actually pulled it off quite well.

Your character's arc as we see it on screen is still powerful, but at what point did you discover that the Peter-Scotty connection was dropped, and how surprised/disappointed were you by that?

I was supremely shocked. I’d gone to see the film in its initial release, of course, when it came out, but at the time I was shooting a film in Florida called Cross Creek, and in flying back I stopped over in Dallas, Ft. Worth to visit my family, my cousins, and aunt and uncle, we all thought of course it’d be great fun to go see the movie together. So that was the first time I was going to get to see it. I was really excited, and I told them all about it, and we’re all sitting in the theater together. The film runs, and I just went, “Where did the scene go? What happened?” It was bizarre to me, because the bit of information that is exchanged in that moment of course explains my character’s relationship to the Scotty and why it’s so meaningful to him, and so emotional for him, to have lost Peter Preston in the attack. It left people with all kinds of bizarre questions, and the fans out there who could dig into and find out information at the time without the luxury of the internet was incredible. Many people knew what the true storyline was and were outraged over that edit, and to this day it has never been explained why. No producer has been able to say why that was important to them. Even Nick Meyer mentions it in his book, A View from the Bridge. He mentions it, actually, on the commentary on the director’s cut Blu-Ray, and a number of other occasions.

It’s just one of those bizarre things that made absolutely no sense. So, yeah, it was extremely disappointing to me on many levels. I had a small part to begin with, but substantial, and then it was cut even shorter, and it made no sense. I had never been cut that much out of anything other than The Formula. So it was very disappointing and, of course, I was very happy when the special edition came out on television. I think the first television screening of it they had put the scene back in, and so all of the fans were very happy to see that, and to know that a version of the film existed that way. It’s just funny to think that for me such a minor character would be so impactful to everyone, that I wasn’t there, that I was there, you know? It’s made the whole experience that much more rewarding for me, that even being cut out of something impacted the fans as much as being put back in. So it has its own little paradox there.

Not long after Wrath of Khan, you guest starred on T.J. Hooker. Was that just a random coincidence, or did Shatner have something to do with it? Did he remember you?

Random coincidence, absolutely. Again, I was a working actor, it was another job that came up. And I thought, “Oh wow, how fun, I’ll get to work with Mr. Shatner again.” Star Trek, it was very James T. Kirk as much as he could be all of the time. And so on set he was very foreboding, and would remain in character most of the time. So my interactions with him were still very professional in that sense, but I never saw that affable, great sense of humor person that he can be to such great effect. So I was a little nervous about going on to a show that was very much his show, as opposed to being the primary leading man character. It was fantastic to get to work with him in that capacity on T.J. Hooker. It was still a serious show, but it had its lighter moments. He was really absolutely delightful to work with, on both of them for different reasons.

Star Trek is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. What does it mean to you, via your one brief, but memorable contribution, to be a part of the Trek phenomenon?

It’s hard to describe, because it means so much to me to have that. Also having Escape to Witch Mountain, I bring the two together because Disney fans are special fans, Star Trek fans are special fans, and having been a part of such iconic titles... Escape to Witch Mountain is such a special film to millions of people, and to this day it’s so meaningful that it’s been passed down to other generations of younger people who enjoy it as well. The same thing with Star Trek; it picks up generations of new fans, and they go back and re-experience the episodes and the entire universe, pardon the pun, of Star Trek. One of the things I think is so fascinating about it is that technology was such a critical component to The Original Series, along with the stories and ideas. And technology has allowed it to expand and grow and survive and continue to be a part of this entertainment giant that it is. Because if it wasn’t for the internet, if it wasn’t for digital media and all these other incredible things that we have now, we wouldn’t be able to enjoy it in the ways we do now, and have it live on in this way. So that’s something I find fascinating. And just having a chance to be part of Star Trek, as I said, prior to that audition that was always something I wanted to do. Then I had a chance to do it, and to have it continue to be so important to the fans is… words just can’t say it. It’s really been a heartwarming experience, and it’s something I’ve grown to enjoy even more as time goes by. So I’m very grateful for it.

Go to www.Creationent.com for additional details about Star Trek Las Vegas - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/talking-to-tos-enterprise-guest-jack-donner#sthash.wboZlNgu.dpuf

Go to www.creationent.com for additional details about Star Trek Las Vegas.

]]>
catching-up-with-khans-peter-preston-iake-eissinmann Mon, 18 Jul 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Final Beyond Trailer Released]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/final-beyond-trailer-released

Paramount Pictures has just released the final Star Trek Beyond trailer and two new clips -- "Justin Lin Featurette" and "Well That's Just Typical." These clips are in support of the upcoming Beyond, giving viewers fresh glimpses of scenes and providing previously unheard snippets of dialogue. 

 



 

Star Trek Beyond opens July 22.

]]>

Paramount Pictures has just released the final Star Trek Beyond trailer and two new clips -- "Justin Lin Featurette" and "Well That's Just Typical." These clips are in support of the upcoming Beyond, giving viewers fresh glimpses of scenes and providing previously unheard snippets of dialogue. 

 



 

Star Trek Beyond opens July 22.

]]>
final-beyond-trailer-released Mon, 18 Jul 2016 09:18:48 -0700
<![CDATA[International Broadcasters Set for New Star Trek Series]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/international-broadcasters-set-for-new-star-trek-series

CBS Studios International has announced that the new Star Trek television series will be broadcast exclusively in 188 countries by Netflix (excluding the United States and Canada), and in Canada by Bell Media.

In a landmark international licensing agreement, each episode of the highly anticipated new Star Trek series will be available to Netflix members exclusively in the 188 countries (excluding the United States and Canada) within 24 hours of the United States premiere. Further, all 727 existing episodes within the Star Trek television library – spanning from The Original Series, The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine to Voyager and Enterprise – will be available on Netflix around the globe by the end of 2016.

The Bell Media rollout for the new Star Trek series in Canada will mirror the launch in the United States. The first episode will premiere on Canada’s most-watched broadcast network, CTV, on the same night as CBS. All remaining episodes will initially be televised on Bell Media’s cable networks, Space (in English) and Z (in French), and then later exclusively on CraveTV, Bell Media’s streaming video-on-demand service. The Star Trek television library will return to Space (in English) and debut on Cinépop (in French), and will also be found among CraveTV’s leading lineup of premium television series.

As previously announced, the all-new Star Trek series will commence production in Toronto in September ahead of a January 2017 premiere. Co-created and executive produced by Bryan Fuller and Alex Kurtzman, the show will feature a new ship, new characters and new missions, while embracing the same ideology and hope for the future seen in Gene Roddenberry's original creation, which spawned the Star Trek spinoff series and feature films, and also inspired generations of viewers and fans.

The new Star Trek series, in the United States, will launch with a special premiere episode on the CBS Television Network in January 2017. The premiere episode and all subsequent episodes will be available in the United States exclusively on CBS All Access, the Network’s digital subscription video on demand and live streaming service. The new Star Trek marks the first original series developed for distribution on CBS All Access, which provides viewers thousands of episodes of CBS’s current and past seasons on demand, plus the ability to stream their local CBS Television station live for $5.99 per month.

]]>

CBS Studios International has announced that the new Star Trek television series will be broadcast exclusively in 188 countries by Netflix (excluding the United States and Canada), and in Canada by Bell Media.

In a landmark international licensing agreement, each episode of the highly anticipated new Star Trek series will be available to Netflix members exclusively in the 188 countries (excluding the United States and Canada) within 24 hours of the United States premiere. Further, all 727 existing episodes within the Star Trek television library – spanning from The Original Series, The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine to Voyager and Enterprise – will be available on Netflix around the globe by the end of 2016.

The Bell Media rollout for the new Star Trek series in Canada will mirror the launch in the United States. The first episode will premiere on Canada’s most-watched broadcast network, CTV, on the same night as CBS. All remaining episodes will initially be televised on Bell Media’s cable networks, Space (in English) and Z (in French), and then later exclusively on CraveTV, Bell Media’s streaming video-on-demand service. The Star Trek television library will return to Space (in English) and debut on Cinépop (in French), and will also be found among CraveTV’s leading lineup of premium television series.

As previously announced, the all-new Star Trek series will commence production in Toronto in September ahead of a January 2017 premiere. Co-created and executive produced by Bryan Fuller and Alex Kurtzman, the show will feature a new ship, new characters and new missions, while embracing the same ideology and hope for the future seen in Gene Roddenberry's original creation, which spawned the Star Trek spinoff series and feature films, and also inspired generations of viewers and fans.

The new Star Trek series, in the United States, will launch with a special premiere episode on the CBS Television Network in January 2017. The premiere episode and all subsequent episodes will be available in the United States exclusively on CBS All Access, the Network’s digital subscription video on demand and live streaming service. The new Star Trek marks the first original series developed for distribution on CBS All Access, which provides viewers thousands of episodes of CBS’s current and past seasons on demand, plus the ability to stream their local CBS Television station live for $5.99 per month.

]]>
international-broadcasters-set-for-new-star-trek-series Mon, 18 Jul 2016 05:59:31 -0700
<![CDATA[John Cho Talks Beyond]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/john-cho-talks-beyond

John Cho is back in action as Sulu in Star Trek Beyond, and the stakes are personal this time for the heroic Enterprise helmsman. (Possible spoiler ahead, folks!). The lives of Sulu's partner and their daughter -- along with those of many, many other people -- hang in the balance as Sulu and the Enterprise crew race to prevent the alien Krall (Idris Elba) from carrying out his dark plan. StarTrek.com recently spoke to Cho about Beyond, which will open July 22, and he discussed, among other topics, the making of the film, the fact that Sulu is presented as gay, George Takei's reaction to that development, and he also commented on the heartbreaking, premature death of his friend and colleague, Anton Yelchin. Here's what Cho had to say:

How ready were you to jump back in the saddle for this third adventure?

I've been ready, man. Mostly it’s just the relationships that we have with one another, with this cast, and with J.J. (Abrams). That was the only shadow, how do we go forward without J.J.? But in terms of working with these people I was ready to go.

What intrigued you most about the story that Simon Pegg and Doug Jung came up with?

First of all, it felt like The Original Series a bit. Obviously, the first film was a genesis story, but the second one felt like the second part of the genesis story to me. And it was interesting to move past that, to be actually going into... fatigue. So Kirk starts this one in a moment of existential crisis, wondering what it’s all about being three years-ish in. I just learned that it’s 966 days, and that was a reference to September 1966, when the original series started...  Anyways, I just liked the idea of starting off-kilter. And the movie starts with a moment of humor and then moves into a long monologue from Kirk about wondering what the meaning of being in Starfleet is. I just thought that was a brilliant way to start, and a brilliant kind of premise. 

How satisfied are you with what Sulu is up to this go-round?

I liked a couple of things about it. One was that we have this insight into his personal life, and that it gave weight to the professional mission that he was on. So it felt like the stakes were raised for him, and I appreciated that. Any time you can go past the button pushing, and the steering of the ship, into more of the emotional side, I like that. I’ve been saying that typically everyone sort of relates to Kirk. He’s the center of the wheel and we’re all spokes off that wheel, off the center. And it was nice to be coupled with Zoe (Saldana), and I thought that might bring out interesting things in the film. And having seen it, I think it does.

A moment people will be talking about is the embrace between Sulu and his partner, Ben (played by co-screenwriter Doug Jung). What was your first reaction when Simon and Doug proposed that, and how do you feel it plays out on screen?

I’ll go in reverse, I was happy with the way it turned out. We discussed this and I was happy to see how well it was executed, but that it was a real non-moment. The film’s attitude towards his partner is one of non-chalance, which is brilliant. And really, it’s a revelation today and it’s news today, but on repeat viewing in 10 years, when hopefully somebody being gay is no news at all, my hope is it won’t bump at all, because it was filmed presuming that we think it’s normal. And I love that about it. So your first question, how did I find out about it? I found out about it from (director) Justin (Lin) early on in pre-production, that he had thrown it in. My initial reaction was one of concern, I had a few concerns. One was how would George react, because I felt obviously that it was a bit of an homage to George Takei, the actor, an activist who has been courageously been living out of the closet, that it would conflate the role and the man, and that he might feel like we had invaded his private life in some ways.

And also that the character that he put out there was straight, and even though we’re in an alternate universe, they are the same person. And then I had this other concern, which is that people would think that we were implying that sexuality was a choice, sexual orientation was a choice, because I am assuming that I am the same genetic Sulu that George played. And so are we implying that in a different alternate timeline, that you can choose to be straight or gay? So those are things I was thinking about.

Takei initially expressed his dissatisfaction with the revelation that your Sulu is gay, but he's since softened that stance a bit to say he appreciates the tribute, likes that there's a gay character, and understands that this is an alternate universe, but just doesn't think it jibes with Gene Roddenberry's vision of the character. What's your take on it all?

It’s a tough disagreement to have, and I would just like to underline that George is pointing out... that we clearly have way more in common in our opinion about this event than we disagree. I just think it’s tough territory when we’re talking about what Roddenberry would have wanted, because he’s not here to speak for himself. In our own way, I feel like we are paying tribute to what we thought Roddenberry would have wanted, or would have made him happy. His intention was to create a universe that adhered to the motto of Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations. And this was, we thought, in line with what he wanted, and would have wanted. We mused that maybe this is where he would have gone had he created the series today.

We're not doing our job if we don't ask about Anton Yelchin. How big a loss was his passing to you as a friend and co-star?

I can’t even really calculate the answers to those two questions. He was just part of our family, and we loved him so much. He was the best, he was the smartest, he was the most artistic, he was beautiful, and his heart was just tremendous. You know, I don’t know how the movie will do. I don’t know how people will like our movie. But I will always look back and think that was the last time I had with my pal.

Moving on to something more positive, what impressed you most about Justin as a director?

Justin has huge balls. He came into an established cast, and into a series that was helmed by J.J. Abrams, who is a man of formidable talent, and just came in and had the courage to do his own thing, emboldened by J.J.’s confidence in him and his admonition to do you, Justin. And he came in and brought his own visual flare. He was very attentive to character dynamics. And he comes in as a fan of Star Trek. He has a very different way about him, but I just remember being up there that first week rehearsing, and everyone was going, “Gee, I really like Justin.” It was cool to see us work in a different way with a different person with very similar results. It was encouraging.

It's eight-plus years now that you've been a part of the Trek franchise. How fast has it gone by so far, and what has it meant to you to be a part of the Trek universe?

It’s an honor to be associated with Star Trek. I just think it’s a very positive cultural contribution, a pop culture contribution. Particularly in light of everything that’s going on in the world, all of the divisiveness, this is something that emphasizes compassion and peace. So I have always appreciated that about Star Trek. It’s something that I keyed into, the diversity. As a child, it was very meaningful to me, so it’s a real honor to be associated with something I consider to be a very positive, American cultural contribution. Eight years..., it just seems like a flash. Just in the process of doing this press, I’ve come across some pictures of us from the first film, and contrary to what I thought, I’ve aged terribly. We just can’t believe it’s been almost a decade, it’s strange.

If there's a fourth Star Trek film, can we count you in?

Yeah. I mean, for superstition’s sake I don’t want to talk about a fourth film. I’ve got to get through this one and make sure people like this one first, but in theory, getting together with this bunch would be a blast.

We never trust IMDB, but it lists Gemini, Literally Right Before Aaron and The Hindenberg Explodes as upcoming projects. Real quick, what excites you about each of those projects?

They are all correct. The Hindenberg Explodes, hilarious, hilarious concept, plus Rob Cordrdy, my pal. Literally Right Before Aaron, I’ve always liked Justin Long’s work, and it was a chance to spend some time with him, and it was fun. Gemini, that was one of the most satisfying parts I’ve played in a long time, and I thank Aaron Katz, the director for coming to me with that one. It felt like it was a true collaboration in character. Every once in a while you come across a filmmaker, and you go, "Oh, here is someone that I would want to work with over and over." It’s very satisfying.

We're hearing rumblings about another Harold & Kumar film. Is one in the works?

No, no... Well, I don’t know. I was just talking to directors about what that would be, and I think we’ve got a really good idea. We’ve got to make a way to make that happen. Can I count on you for $7 million?

Sure.

Then maybe.

You've made one or two Star Trek convention apearances. What have you enjoybed about meeting the fans?

I always love meeting Star Trek fans. I’ll tell you why. They are totally heterogeneous, and it’s so fun to see the variations in age, culture and generation. It’s just a delight. Star Trek has been around for 50 years, so you have people who went into aerospace or astronomy as a result of Star Trek, you know? It’s just fun to be exposed to all of the different paths people have taken, but they share this one thing in common. It’s unbelievable.

]]>

John Cho is back in action as Sulu in Star Trek Beyond, and the stakes are personal this time for the heroic Enterprise helmsman. (Possible spoiler ahead, folks!). The lives of Sulu's partner and their daughter -- along with those of many, many other people -- hang in the balance as Sulu and the Enterprise crew race to prevent the alien Krall (Idris Elba) from carrying out his dark plan. StarTrek.com recently spoke to Cho about Beyond, which will open July 22, and he discussed, among other topics, the making of the film, the fact that Sulu is presented as gay, George Takei's reaction to that development, and he also commented on the heartbreaking, premature death of his friend and colleague, Anton Yelchin. Here's what Cho had to say:

How ready were you to jump back in the saddle for this third adventure?

I've been ready, man. Mostly it’s just the relationships that we have with one another, with this cast, and with J.J. (Abrams). That was the only shadow, how do we go forward without J.J.? But in terms of working with these people I was ready to go.

What intrigued you most about the story that Simon Pegg and Doug Jung came up with?

First of all, it felt like The Original Series a bit. Obviously, the first film was a genesis story, but the second one felt like the second part of the genesis story to me. And it was interesting to move past that, to be actually going into... fatigue. So Kirk starts this one in a moment of existential crisis, wondering what it’s all about being three years-ish in. I just learned that it’s 966 days, and that was a reference to September 1966, when the original series started...  Anyways, I just liked the idea of starting off-kilter. And the movie starts with a moment of humor and then moves into a long monologue from Kirk about wondering what the meaning of being in Starfleet is. I just thought that was a brilliant way to start, and a brilliant kind of premise. 

How satisfied are you with what Sulu is up to this go-round?

I liked a couple of things about it. One was that we have this insight into his personal life, and that it gave weight to the professional mission that he was on. So it felt like the stakes were raised for him, and I appreciated that. Any time you can go past the button pushing, and the steering of the ship, into more of the emotional side, I like that. I’ve been saying that typically everyone sort of relates to Kirk. He’s the center of the wheel and we’re all spokes off that wheel, off the center. And it was nice to be coupled with Zoe (Saldana), and I thought that might bring out interesting things in the film. And having seen it, I think it does.

A moment people will be talking about is the embrace between Sulu and his partner, Ben (played by co-screenwriter Doug Jung). What was your first reaction when Simon and Doug proposed that, and how do you feel it plays out on screen?

I’ll go in reverse, I was happy with the way it turned out. We discussed this and I was happy to see how well it was executed, but that it was a real non-moment. The film’s attitude towards his partner is one of non-chalance, which is brilliant. And really, it’s a revelation today and it’s news today, but on repeat viewing in 10 years, when hopefully somebody being gay is no news at all, my hope is it won’t bump at all, because it was filmed presuming that we think it’s normal. And I love that about it. So your first question, how did I find out about it? I found out about it from (director) Justin (Lin) early on in pre-production, that he had thrown it in. My initial reaction was one of concern, I had a few concerns. One was how would George react, because I felt obviously that it was a bit of an homage to George Takei, the actor, an activist who has been courageously been living out of the closet, that it would conflate the role and the man, and that he might feel like we had invaded his private life in some ways.

And also that the character that he put out there was straight, and even though we’re in an alternate universe, they are the same person. And then I had this other concern, which is that people would think that we were implying that sexuality was a choice, sexual orientation was a choice, because I am assuming that I am the same genetic Sulu that George played. And so are we implying that in a different alternate timeline, that you can choose to be straight or gay? So those are things I was thinking about.

Takei initially expressed his dissatisfaction with the revelation that your Sulu is gay, but he's since softened that stance a bit to say he appreciates the tribute, likes that there's a gay character, and understands that this is an alternate universe, but just doesn't think it jibes with Gene Roddenberry's vision of the character. What's your take on it all?

It’s a tough disagreement to have, and I would just like to underline that George is pointing out... that we clearly have way more in common in our opinion about this event than we disagree. I just think it’s tough territory when we’re talking about what Roddenberry would have wanted, because he’s not here to speak for himself. In our own way, I feel like we are paying tribute to what we thought Roddenberry would have wanted, or would have made him happy. His intention was to create a universe that adhered to the motto of Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations. And this was, we thought, in line with what he wanted, and would have wanted. We mused that maybe this is where he would have gone had he created the series today.

We're not doing our job if we don't ask about Anton Yelchin. How big a loss was his passing to you as a friend and co-star?

I can’t even really calculate the answers to those two questions. He was just part of our family, and we loved him so much. He was the best, he was the smartest, he was the most artistic, he was beautiful, and his heart was just tremendous. You know, I don’t know how the movie will do. I don’t know how people will like our movie. But I will always look back and think that was the last time I had with my pal.

Moving on to something more positive, what impressed you most about Justin as a director?

Justin has huge balls. He came into an established cast, and into a series that was helmed by J.J. Abrams, who is a man of formidable talent, and just came in and had the courage to do his own thing, emboldened by J.J.’s confidence in him and his admonition to do you, Justin. And he came in and brought his own visual flare. He was very attentive to character dynamics. And he comes in as a fan of Star Trek. He has a very different way about him, but I just remember being up there that first week rehearsing, and everyone was going, “Gee, I really like Justin.” It was cool to see us work in a different way with a different person with very similar results. It was encouraging.

It's eight-plus years now that you've been a part of the Trek franchise. How fast has it gone by so far, and what has it meant to you to be a part of the Trek universe?

It’s an honor to be associated with Star Trek. I just think it’s a very positive cultural contribution, a pop culture contribution. Particularly in light of everything that’s going on in the world, all of the divisiveness, this is something that emphasizes compassion and peace. So I have always appreciated that about Star Trek. It’s something that I keyed into, the diversity. As a child, it was very meaningful to me, so it’s a real honor to be associated with something I consider to be a very positive, American cultural contribution. Eight years..., it just seems like a flash. Just in the process of doing this press, I’ve come across some pictures of us from the first film, and contrary to what I thought, I’ve aged terribly. We just can’t believe it’s been almost a decade, it’s strange.

If there's a fourth Star Trek film, can we count you in?

Yeah. I mean, for superstition’s sake I don’t want to talk about a fourth film. I’ve got to get through this one and make sure people like this one first, but in theory, getting together with this bunch would be a blast.

We never trust IMDB, but it lists Gemini, Literally Right Before Aaron and The Hindenberg Explodes as upcoming projects. Real quick, what excites you about each of those projects?

They are all correct. The Hindenberg Explodes, hilarious, hilarious concept, plus Rob Cordrdy, my pal. Literally Right Before Aaron, I’ve always liked Justin Long’s work, and it was a chance to spend some time with him, and it was fun. Gemini, that was one of the most satisfying parts I’ve played in a long time, and I thank Aaron Katz, the director for coming to me with that one. It felt like it was a true collaboration in character. Every once in a while you come across a filmmaker, and you go, "Oh, here is someone that I would want to work with over and over." It’s very satisfying.

We're hearing rumblings about another Harold & Kumar film. Is one in the works?

No, no... Well, I don’t know. I was just talking to directors about what that would be, and I think we’ve got a really good idea. We’ve got to make a way to make that happen. Can I count on you for $7 million?

Sure.

Then maybe.

You've made one or two Star Trek convention apearances. What have you enjoybed about meeting the fans?

I always love meeting Star Trek fans. I’ll tell you why. They are totally heterogeneous, and it’s so fun to see the variations in age, culture and generation. It’s just a delight. Star Trek has been around for 50 years, so you have people who went into aerospace or astronomy as a result of Star Trek, you know? It’s just fun to be exposed to all of the different paths people have taken, but they share this one thing in common. It’s unbelievable.

]]>
john-cho-talks-beyond Sun, 17 Jul 2016 11:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Alien Delicacy You'd Most Like to Try Is... ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/alien-delicacy-youd-most-like-to-try-is

Heart of Targ, Plomeek Soup, Rokeg Blood Pie, Romulan Ale or Tarvorkian Cakes. Those were the reply options for this week's StarTrek.com poll question, which was: Which alien delicacy would you most like to try? Nearly 4,000 fans replied, and here are the results...

 

Romulan Ale (72%)


Plomeek Soup (13%)


Tarvorkian Cakes (10%)


Heart of Targ (3% 119 votes)


Rokeg Blood Pie (3% 113 votes)

 

So, did your choice devour the competition?

]]>

Heart of Targ, Plomeek Soup, Rokeg Blood Pie, Romulan Ale or Tarvorkian Cakes. Those were the reply options for this week's StarTrek.com poll question, which was: Which alien delicacy would you most like to try? Nearly 4,000 fans replied, and here are the results...

 

Romulan Ale (72%)


Plomeek Soup (13%)


Tarvorkian Cakes (10%)


Heart of Targ (3% 119 votes)


Rokeg Blood Pie (3% 113 votes)

 

So, did your choice devour the competition?

]]>
alien-delicacy-youd-most-like-to-try-is Sun, 17 Jul 2016 06:39:04 -0700
<![CDATA[Star Trek: The Movies Book Out Now ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/star-trek-the-movies-book-out-now

Star Trek: The Movies, Vol. 1 is out now from Titan Magazines, creators of The Official Star Trek Magazine. The Movies gives readers unprecedented access into every aspect of cinematic Star Trek via reprints of articles that are in-depth and illustrated with vivid artwork, much of the art rarely before seen. Below are 10 things readers can look forward to reading/learning about in the pages of The Movies:

Go To Star Trek Magazine


THE KELVIN TIMELINE

As Star Trek Beyond wows audiences in cinemas worldwide, relive the making of J.J.Abrams’ Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness with a collection of fascinating behind-the-scenes features.

THE ORIGINAL MOVIES

From Star Trek: The Motion Picture to Nemesis, explore the cinematic worlds encountered by the crews of the original Enterprise and the Next Generation.

RECREATING STAR TREK

Go To Star Trek Magazine

J.J. Abrams, Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman reveal how they reinvented Gene Roddenberry’s classic sci-fi universe by creating an entirely new and parallel universe of their own.

FATHER AND SON

The heroic death of Chris Hemsworth’s George Kirk was the dramatic impetus that sent Chris Pine’s James T. Kirk out into the stars. Both actors give their take on the Kirk legacy.

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER

Go To Star Trek Magazine

Leonard Nimoy handed the mantle of Spock to Zachary Quinto in Star Trek (2009). Find out how that transition was made in a classic interview with Nimoy, plus Quinto reveals how he furthered the character in Star Trek Into Darkness

THE BAD GUYS

Go To Star Trek Magazine

A Star Trek movie isn’t a Star Trek movie without an arch enemy. Discover how to make a bad guy good with actors Eric Bana, Peter Weller, Benedict Cumberbatch and Malcolm McDowell.

THE GOOD GIRLS

Go To Star Trek Magazine

Meet the actors ensuring that Star Trek sets a benchmark for equality: Zoe Saldana (Uhura), Alice Eve (Carol Marcus), and Catherine Hicks (The Voyage Home’s Gillian Taylor).

THERE MAY BE TROUBLE AHEAD

Many a movie faces a turbulent gestation period – sometimes it’s a wonder they ever make it to the silver screen. The story of the making of Star Trek: The Motion Picture is no exception… 

TO THE STARS

Star Trek (2009) introduced a cast of young actors in some truly iconic roles, and Into Darkness gave them an opportunity to make them their own. Discover how Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg, John Cho and Anton Yelchin approached their roles for a second time.

PAGE TURNERS

Turning a feature film into a novelization is an art in and of itself. After all, if a picture paints a thousand words, how many does a movie paint? That’s 25 frames per second, multiplied by – oh, you do the math.

 

Star Trek: The Movies, Vol. 1 costs $19.99 in the US, $25.99 in Canada and $14.99 in British pounds in the UK. For more information or to purchase your copy, visit www.titan-comics.com.

]]>

Star Trek: The Movies, Vol. 1 is out now from Titan Magazines, creators of The Official Star Trek Magazine. The Movies gives readers unprecedented access into every aspect of cinematic Star Trek via reprints of articles that are in-depth and illustrated with vivid artwork, much of the art rarely before seen. Below are 10 things readers can look forward to reading/learning about in the pages of The Movies:

Go To Star Trek Magazine


THE KELVIN TIMELINE

As Star Trek Beyond wows audiences in cinemas worldwide, relive the making of J.J.Abrams’ Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness with a collection of fascinating behind-the-scenes features.

THE ORIGINAL MOVIES

From Star Trek: The Motion Picture to Nemesis, explore the cinematic worlds encountered by the crews of the original Enterprise and the Next Generation.

RECREATING STAR TREK

Go To Star Trek Magazine

J.J. Abrams, Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman reveal how they reinvented Gene Roddenberry’s classic sci-fi universe by creating an entirely new and parallel universe of their own.

FATHER AND SON

The heroic death of Chris Hemsworth’s George Kirk was the dramatic impetus that sent Chris Pine’s James T. Kirk out into the stars. Both actors give their take on the Kirk legacy.

LIVE LONG AND PROSPER

Go To Star Trek Magazine

Leonard Nimoy handed the mantle of Spock to Zachary Quinto in Star Trek (2009). Find out how that transition was made in a classic interview with Nimoy, plus Quinto reveals how he furthered the character in Star Trek Into Darkness

THE BAD GUYS

Go To Star Trek Magazine

A Star Trek movie isn’t a Star Trek movie without an arch enemy. Discover how to make a bad guy good with actors Eric Bana, Peter Weller, Benedict Cumberbatch and Malcolm McDowell.

THE GOOD GIRLS

Go To Star Trek Magazine

Meet the actors ensuring that Star Trek sets a benchmark for equality: Zoe Saldana (Uhura), Alice Eve (Carol Marcus), and Catherine Hicks (The Voyage Home’s Gillian Taylor).

THERE MAY BE TROUBLE AHEAD

Many a movie faces a turbulent gestation period – sometimes it’s a wonder they ever make it to the silver screen. The story of the making of Star Trek: The Motion Picture is no exception… 

TO THE STARS

Star Trek (2009) introduced a cast of young actors in some truly iconic roles, and Into Darkness gave them an opportunity to make them their own. Discover how Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, Karl Urban, Simon Pegg, John Cho and Anton Yelchin approached their roles for a second time.

PAGE TURNERS

Turning a feature film into a novelization is an art in and of itself. After all, if a picture paints a thousand words, how many does a movie paint? That’s 25 frames per second, multiplied by – oh, you do the math.

 

Star Trek: The Movies, Vol. 1 costs $19.99 in the US, $25.99 in Canada and $14.99 in British pounds in the UK. For more information or to purchase your copy, visit www.titan-comics.com.

]]>
star-trek-the-movies-book-out-now Sat, 16 Jul 2016 08:00:00 -0700
<![CDATA[Nichols & Spiner Signing at Comic-Con ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/nichols-spiner-signing-at-comic-con

Nichelle Nichols and Brent Spiner will beam down to the Entertainment Earth booth (#2343) at San Diego Comic-Con 2016 to sign autographs for fans, it was announced today by Entertainment Earth and CBS. Nichols and Spiner will be signing for free, with Nichols set for Friday, July 22, 2016 from 11:00am - 12:00pm and Spiner locked and loaded for Saturday, July 23, 2016 from 1:00pm - 1:30pm.

Convention attendees can pick up any of the 2016 Star Trek anniversary convention exclusives, such as the 24K Gold-Plated Enterprise Monitor Mate Bobble Ship and the Amok Time Kirk vs. Spock Dueling Bobble Heads. Plus, select Star Trek merchandise from Bif Bang Pow! will also be available for purchase at the Entertainment Earth booth #2343 during the convention, including Wrath of Khan Commander Uhura Bobble Head and Sherlock Holmes Data and La Forge Bobble Heads.

All signings will be located at the Entertainment Earth booth #2343 and are free to convention attendees. However, a winning ticket is required to attend. Details on how to obtain a randomly distributed winning ticket will be available at the Entertainment Earth booth Starting July 20, 2016.

Appearance dates and times are subject to cancellation or change without notice. Please check the Entertainment Earth booth, website, or the Entertainment Earth social channels for latest Entertainment Earth and San Diego Comic-Con news.

Further, Nichelle Nichols will be available for autographs in the Artist Alley throughout the convention with purchase of Autographed Tribbles ($50) or Custom Jewelry personally crafted by Nichelle ($80).

Available times and days:

Thursday, July 21 from 2:30pm - 7:00pm (AA-10)
Friday, July 22 from 2:30pm - 7:00pm (AA-33)
Saturday, July 23 from 10:00am - 7:00pm (AA-17)
Sunday, July 24 from 1:30pm - 5:00pm (AA-17)

]]>

Nichelle Nichols and Brent Spiner will beam down to the Entertainment Earth booth (#2343) at San Diego Comic-Con 2016 to sign autographs for fans, it was announced today by Entertainment Earth and CBS. Nichols and Spiner will be signing for free, with Nichols set for Friday, July 22, 2016 from 11:00am - 12:00pm and Spiner locked and loaded for Saturday, July 23, 2016 from 1:00pm - 1:30pm.

Convention attendees can pick up any of the 2016 Star Trek anniversary convention exclusives, such as the 24K Gold-Plated Enterprise Monitor Mate Bobble Ship and the Amok Time Kirk vs. Spock Dueling Bobble Heads. Plus, select Star Trek merchandise from Bif Bang Pow! will also be available for purchase at the Entertainment Earth booth #2343 during the convention, including Wrath of Khan Commander Uhura Bobble Head and Sherlock Holmes Data and La Forge Bobble Heads.

All signings will be located at the Entertainment Earth booth #2343 and are free to convention attendees. However, a winning ticket is required to attend. Details on how to obtain a randomly distributed winning ticket will be available at the Entertainment Earth booth Starting July 20, 2016.

Appearance dates and times are subject to cancellation or change without notice. Please check the Entertainment Earth booth, website, or the Entertainment Earth social channels for latest Entertainment Earth and San Diego Comic-Con news.

Further, Nichelle Nichols will be available for autographs in the Artist Alley throughout the convention with purchase of Autographed Tribbles ($50) or Custom Jewelry personally crafted by Nichelle ($80).

Available times and days:

Thursday, July 21 from 2:30pm - 7:00pm (AA-10)
Friday, July 22 from 2:30pm - 7:00pm (AA-33)
Saturday, July 23 from 10:00am - 7:00pm (AA-17)
Sunday, July 24 from 1:30pm - 5:00pm (AA-17)

]]>
nichols-spiner-signing-at-comic-con Fri, 15 Jul 2016 11:00:00 -0700