Star Trek Latest News http://startrek.com Star Trek Latest News Sun, 04 Dec 2016 04:00:00 -0800 info@startrek.com (Star Trek Team) en <![CDATA[Celebrate Bartender Appreciation Day in Trek-style]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/celebrate-bartender-appreciation-day-in-trek-style

Dr. Boyce uttered the following to Captain Pike in "The Cage," the initial Star Trek: The Original Series pilot: "Sometimes, a man'll tell his bartender things he'll... never tell his doctor." And that, our friends, shows you how far back Star Trek and bartenders go. Thus, it's only fitting that today, Bartender Appreciation Day, we celebrate Star Trek's bartenders, gif-style -- when possible, otherwise with photos. Quark and Guinan are the easy ones, but we've identified quite a few more. So, join us as we hoist a Romulan Ale to all the bartenders out there... real and imagined.

Quark (Deep Space Nine)

Guinan (The Next Generation)

Dixon Hill Bartender (First Contact)

Dessica II Alien Bartender (TNG)

Michael Sullivan (Voyager)

Ed (The Original Series)

Graife (DS9)

Rex (TNG)

Bartender (TOS/DS9)

And, who are your favorite bartenders... on Star Trek and in real life?

]]>

Dr. Boyce uttered the following to Captain Pike in "The Cage," the initial Star Trek: The Original Series pilot: "Sometimes, a man'll tell his bartender things he'll... never tell his doctor." And that, our friends, shows you how far back Star Trek and bartenders go. Thus, it's only fitting that today, Bartender Appreciation Day, we celebrate Star Trek's bartenders, gif-style -- when possible, otherwise with photos. Quark and Guinan are the easy ones, but we've identified quite a few more. So, join us as we hoist a Romulan Ale to all the bartenders out there... real and imagined.

Quark (Deep Space Nine)

Guinan (The Next Generation)

Dixon Hill Bartender (First Contact)

Dessica II Alien Bartender (TNG)

Michael Sullivan (Voyager)

Ed (The Original Series)

Graife (DS9)

Rex (TNG)

Bartender (TOS/DS9)

And, who are your favorite bartenders... on Star Trek and in real life?

]]>
celebrate-bartender-appreciation-day-in-trek-style Sun, 04 Dec 2016 04:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Trek Tech Device Highest On Your Holiday Wish List Is... ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/trek-tech-device-highest-on-your-holiday-wish-list-is

A phaser, communicator, transporter, tricorder, holodeck and universal translator. Those were the options fans could choose from in replying to the following StarTrek.com weekly poll question: Which technological device would be on your wish list for the holidays? More than 4,000 fans voted, and here are the results:

Holodeck (43%)

Transporter (35%)

Universal Translator (8%)

Tricorder (6%, 270 votes)

Phaser (6%, 254 votes)

Communicator (2%, 94 votes)

We hope your wish comes true!

]]>

A phaser, communicator, transporter, tricorder, holodeck and universal translator. Those were the options fans could choose from in replying to the following StarTrek.com weekly poll question: Which technological device would be on your wish list for the holidays? More than 4,000 fans voted, and here are the results:

Holodeck (43%)

Transporter (35%)

Universal Translator (8%)

Tricorder (6%, 270 votes)

Phaser (6%, 254 votes)

Communicator (2%, 94 votes)

We hope your wish comes true!

]]>
trek-tech-device-highest-on-your-holiday-wish-list-is Sun, 04 Dec 2016 03:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[WATCH: Picardo Reads From Sagan's The Pale Blue Dot ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/watch-picardo-reads-from-sagans-the-pale-blue-dot

Hello, StarTrek.com readers. Robert Picardo here. Welcome to my latest Planetary Post. Back in 1990, the Voyager spacecraft -- and I mean the REAL Voyager spacecraft -- took a photo of our planet from about 6,000,000,000 km away. This distant image of Earth inspired Carl Sagan, the Planetary Society's co-founder, to write some very moving and inspirational words about our home in his book, The Pale Blue Dot. It is my particular honor to read some of those words in the new Planetary Post. I hope Sagan's words will mean as much to you as they do to me...

Learn more about The Planetary Society by going to www.planetary.org. And just tell them The Doctor sent you.

]]>

Hello, StarTrek.com readers. Robert Picardo here. Welcome to my latest Planetary Post. Back in 1990, the Voyager spacecraft -- and I mean the REAL Voyager spacecraft -- took a photo of our planet from about 6,000,000,000 km away. This distant image of Earth inspired Carl Sagan, the Planetary Society's co-founder, to write some very moving and inspirational words about our home in his book, The Pale Blue Dot. It is my particular honor to read some of those words in the new Planetary Post. I hope Sagan's words will mean as much to you as they do to me...

Learn more about The Planetary Society by going to www.planetary.org. And just tell them The Doctor sent you.

]]>
watch-picardo-reads-from-sagans-the-pale-blue-dot Sat, 03 Dec 2016 03:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Dusty Abell on His 50 Artists. 50 Years. Contribution]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/dusty-abell-on-his-50-artists-50-years-contribution

The smile on Dusty Abell's face was as bright as his artwork on the wall behind him when StarTrek.com caught up with him at the Star Trek. 50 Artists. 50 Years. exhibition at Michael J. Wolf Fine Arts gallery in San Diego during this past summer's Comic-Con festivities. Abell is a character designer in the animation industry, and he was previously employed as a comic book penciler and cover artist. His 50 Artists. 50 Years contribution is "Star Trek: The Original Series," a 27"x40" digital illustration that features at least one character, creature, ship or location from all 79 episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series. He collaborated on his Trek piece with co-colorist Lovern Kindzierski, a comic book artist. Here's what Abell had to say during our brief conversation:

How exciting is it for you to be a part of the 50th exhibition?

It's a blast. Star Trek is something I grew up with as a kid. I have a great passion for it, and so it's just an honor to be included. There are so many other great pieces of art here and it's something I'll always look back on with a lot of fond memories, being a part of this with the 50th anniversary, and this exhibition and all these artists. It's a big deal.

Tell us about your piece. What was the inspiration? What did you want to capture?

What I wanted to capture was... just my love for the diversity of the cast, the characters, the situations, the drama, the comedy, the great production design, the ships, the characters, the costumes. Everything about The Original Series shaped what I became as an artist. So, that was kind of the start.

The depictions are realistic-looking and comic-book-style at the same time...

I guess that's kind of my thing, because people respond to the fact that the likenesses are pretty accurate, I suppose, even though it's done in more of an animation style. That's just the way I draw. I guess Nagel is the guy that kind of influenced me early on in that direction of not a lot of line work, but it's a kind of elegant figure drawing, facial drawing style. He was the guy in the `80s, all of the Miami Vice, Duran Duran covers and all that stuff. That inspired the eliminating of a lot of extraneous lines. That's why my stuff is bare. I just try to capture it all with as little as possible, but still make it really identifiable and, hopefully, still have it look appealing.

As a fan of the show, what did you have to have in the piece? What's your favorite little bit in there?

I'd have to say the dog, probably. The little dog with the costume, which is so laughable when you watch it in the episode, but it's just something I always ... I knew I wanted to get it in there. I also had to make a decision whether I wanted to show Jimmy Doohan's missing finger or not, which you can actually see in an episode of TOS. People have called me out on that, but I decided to leave it in because I think they faked it on the show most of the time and they had the stuntman or the double doing the transporter effect. So, in canon, he, I guess, has all five fingers on his hand. I chose to give him the five fingers. But the dog was probably my favorite thing to put in there.

What do you make of all the complementary elements of the exhibition, such as the books and puzzles and mugs based on the art?

The puzzle was a surprise. Nobody told me about the puzzle. I saw that one day and I was really pleasantly surprised. I think Star Trek fans are probably enjoying it. I hope they are. I don't know. I looked for reviews on Amazon for the first person that actually does the puzzle and posts a review on it.

Shouldn't you be the person able to assemble the puzzle faster than anyone on Earth?

Yes, exactly. I have to take myself out of it at work. We do puzzles. I work at Warner Brothers and at lunch we sometimes do puzzles and I definitely have to take a back seat because I know where every piece goes.

Abell's Star Trek The Original Series 50th Anniversary Poster, which measures 27"x40", is available for purchase and priced at $40. Go to www.dustyabell.com to buy it.

]]>

The smile on Dusty Abell's face was as bright as his artwork on the wall behind him when StarTrek.com caught up with him at the Star Trek. 50 Artists. 50 Years. exhibition at Michael J. Wolf Fine Arts gallery in San Diego during this past summer's Comic-Con festivities. Abell is a character designer in the animation industry, and he was previously employed as a comic book penciler and cover artist. His 50 Artists. 50 Years contribution is "Star Trek: The Original Series," a 27"x40" digital illustration that features at least one character, creature, ship or location from all 79 episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series. He collaborated on his Trek piece with co-colorist Lovern Kindzierski, a comic book artist. Here's what Abell had to say during our brief conversation:

How exciting is it for you to be a part of the 50th exhibition?

It's a blast. Star Trek is something I grew up with as a kid. I have a great passion for it, and so it's just an honor to be included. There are so many other great pieces of art here and it's something I'll always look back on with a lot of fond memories, being a part of this with the 50th anniversary, and this exhibition and all these artists. It's a big deal.

Tell us about your piece. What was the inspiration? What did you want to capture?

What I wanted to capture was... just my love for the diversity of the cast, the characters, the situations, the drama, the comedy, the great production design, the ships, the characters, the costumes. Everything about The Original Series shaped what I became as an artist. So, that was kind of the start.

The depictions are realistic-looking and comic-book-style at the same time...

I guess that's kind of my thing, because people respond to the fact that the likenesses are pretty accurate, I suppose, even though it's done in more of an animation style. That's just the way I draw. I guess Nagel is the guy that kind of influenced me early on in that direction of not a lot of line work, but it's a kind of elegant figure drawing, facial drawing style. He was the guy in the `80s, all of the Miami Vice, Duran Duran covers and all that stuff. That inspired the eliminating of a lot of extraneous lines. That's why my stuff is bare. I just try to capture it all with as little as possible, but still make it really identifiable and, hopefully, still have it look appealing.

As a fan of the show, what did you have to have in the piece? What's your favorite little bit in there?

I'd have to say the dog, probably. The little dog with the costume, which is so laughable when you watch it in the episode, but it's just something I always ... I knew I wanted to get it in there. I also had to make a decision whether I wanted to show Jimmy Doohan's missing finger or not, which you can actually see in an episode of TOS. People have called me out on that, but I decided to leave it in because I think they faked it on the show most of the time and they had the stuntman or the double doing the transporter effect. So, in canon, he, I guess, has all five fingers on his hand. I chose to give him the five fingers. But the dog was probably my favorite thing to put in there.

What do you make of all the complementary elements of the exhibition, such as the books and puzzles and mugs based on the art?

The puzzle was a surprise. Nobody told me about the puzzle. I saw that one day and I was really pleasantly surprised. I think Star Trek fans are probably enjoying it. I hope they are. I don't know. I looked for reviews on Amazon for the first person that actually does the puzzle and posts a review on it.

Shouldn't you be the person able to assemble the puzzle faster than anyone on Earth?

Yes, exactly. I have to take myself out of it at work. We do puzzles. I work at Warner Brothers and at lunch we sometimes do puzzles and I definitely have to take a back seat because I know where every piece goes.

Abell's Star Trek The Original Series 50th Anniversary Poster, which measures 27"x40", is available for purchase and priced at $40. Go to www.dustyabell.com to buy it.

]]>
dusty-abell-on-his-50-artists-50-years-contribution Sat, 03 Dec 2016 02:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Cobbs, Meriwether & Jones Co-star in The Ultimate Legacy]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/cobbs-meriwether-jones-co-star-in-the-ultimate-legacy

Not one, not two, but three Star Trek actors co-star in the upcoming DVD release of the family television movie The Ultimate Legacy. And the three actors are Lee Meriwether, Bill Cobbs and Doug Jones. Meriwether guest starred as Losira in the third-season TOS episode “That Which Survives,” while Cobbs played Emory Erickson, inventor of the transporter, in the Enterprise installment "Daedalus." And, Jones was just cast as the alien Lt. Saru in Discovery.

Star Trek's Bill Cobbs in The Ultimate Legacy

Star Trek's Doug Jones and Lee Meriwether in The Ultimate Legacy

The Ultimate Legacy, which Cinedigm will release January 3 on DVD and Digital HD, is a follow-up to the telemovies The Ultimate Gift and The Ultimate Life. In follows the journey of Jason Stevens (Logan Bartholomew), as he learns firsthand the value of teaching. Jason must provide guidance to a self-absorbed young man, Joey Anderson (Myko Olivier), who is forced to run his family’s bed-and-breakfast for a year before earning his inheritance in his late grandmother’s will. As part of Joey’s journey to purpose, he is challenged to grow a conscience and learn to appreciate hard work, forgiveness, generosity and the enduring value of family and friends. In addition to Meriwether, Cobbs, Jones, Bartholomew and Olivier, the film co-stars Brian Dennehy and Raquel Welch.

Doug Jones and Costar in The Ultimate Legacy

Cobbs and Meriwether in The Ultimate Legacy

]]>

Not one, not two, but three Star Trek actors co-star in the upcoming DVD release of the family television movie The Ultimate Legacy. And the three actors are Lee Meriwether, Bill Cobbs and Doug Jones. Meriwether guest starred as Losira in the third-season TOS episode “That Which Survives,” while Cobbs played Emory Erickson, inventor of the transporter, in the Enterprise installment "Daedalus." And, Jones was just cast as the alien Lt. Saru in Discovery.

Star Trek's Bill Cobbs in The Ultimate Legacy

Star Trek's Doug Jones and Lee Meriwether in The Ultimate Legacy

The Ultimate Legacy, which Cinedigm will release January 3 on DVD and Digital HD, is a follow-up to the telemovies The Ultimate Gift and The Ultimate Life. In follows the journey of Jason Stevens (Logan Bartholomew), as he learns firsthand the value of teaching. Jason must provide guidance to a self-absorbed young man, Joey Anderson (Myko Olivier), who is forced to run his family’s bed-and-breakfast for a year before earning his inheritance in his late grandmother’s will. As part of Joey’s journey to purpose, he is challenged to grow a conscience and learn to appreciate hard work, forgiveness, generosity and the enduring value of family and friends. In addition to Meriwether, Cobbs, Jones, Bartholomew and Olivier, the film co-stars Brian Dennehy and Raquel Welch.

Doug Jones and Costar in The Ultimate Legacy

Cobbs and Meriwether in The Ultimate Legacy

]]>
cobbs-meriwether-jones-co-star-in-the-ultimate-legacy Fri, 02 Dec 2016 10:52:01 -0800
<![CDATA[Preserving Star Trek’s Musical Legacy]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/preserving-star-trekundefineds-musical-legacy

La-La Land Records is celebrating the 50th anniversary of Star Trek with the release of “Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection — Musical Rarities from Across the Star Trek Universe,” a 4-CD album featuring music from the Star Trek TV series, movies, games and even theme park rides. The album includes the premiere release of the soundtrack to Star Trek: The Animated Series, long requested by fans.

While this set may be viewed as the culmination of Star Trek soundtrack releases, less than 10 years ago it may not have seemed possible. Star Trek debuted in 1966 and spawned a galaxy of collectible products: books, toys, models, clothing, comic books and much more. But what about soundtrack albums? The Original Series had some of the finest music ever composed for television, but while there were a few re-recordings of the theme over the years, it was not until the mid-1980s that a handful of soundtrack albums were released — most of them newly performed (not the actual recordings heard in the show) and featuring only highlights from selected episodes.

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) marked the first time Star Trek fans and music lovers could finally own music heard in an actual Star Trek production. That album was arranged (as were most soundtrack releases of the time) specifically for vinyl, meaning each 20-minute side was designed for an optimum listening experience instead of following the chronological film order. The format of selected highlights (usually out of film sequence) continued for the feature films starring The Original Series and The Next Generation casts, even in the CD era.

In the late 1980s and ’90s, GNP Crescendo Records was the home for Star Trek soundtracks and they did a great job making television albums available from TOS, TNG, DS9 and Voyager — but business realities at the time (particularly involving the musicians union) precluded anything but occasional releases.

Starting in 2009 things began to change. Specialty soundtrack labels like Film Score Monthly, La-La Land Records, Intrada and Varèse Sarabande — as well as GNP Crescendo — began to release “collector’s editions” of the complete scores to the feature films (excepting Star Trek Beyond, which is too recent), along with multi-disc collections from the television series. No longer hindered by the time constraints of an LP or expensive “re-use” fees to the Hollywood session musicians (owing to an important policy change by the musicians union), these limited-edition releases offer the full scores, painstakingly assembled to reflect the music as heard in the productions. Film Score Monthly released a 14-CD box set featuring composer Ron Jones’s music from TNG, while La-La Land Records released the mammoth 15CD set of music from TOS — satisfying many fans who waited nearly 50 years to have all of this music. La-La Land Records has also released multi-disc collections from TNG, DS9 and Enterprise, with a Voyager set scheduled for early 2017.

So how does all of this music get released? First, deals are made between the studios (CBS for the television soundtracks, Paramount Pictures for the features) and, if applicable, the original record label that released the LP or CD. (Usually the original record companies have the soundtrack rights in “perpetuity deals,” meaning they have to be involved.) This can require the studios and labels to dig through paperwork to make sure the original contracts are in order and that all the royalty obligations are understood.

After deals are approved, the studios’ physical elements are requested. These tapes can vary in shape, quantity and configuration. Producing the albums is like re-experiencing technological change, with different analogue and digital tape formats appearing and disappearing over the years. For example, TMP was recorded onto 37 reels of 2'' 16-track analog tape, but by 1991, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country was recorded onto seven 1'' 32-track digital tapes. (Today, music is recorded directly to hard drives with computer software.) The goal is to always go to the earliest, best source.

The original 1” tapes for Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Once the tapes are transferred it’s up to producers, editors, mixers and mastering engineers to shape the final albums. This is like re-assembling a jigsaw puzzle: all of the correct musical takes, choral overlays (if applicable), “sweeteners” and revisions from the scoring process have to be located and reconstituted. The expanded Star Trek CDs have had a remarkable continuity, with many of the same people working on all of the releases (despite the different boutique labels). The goal has always been to present the complete music as heard in the film in film sequence. Ideally the albums present the master mixes made for the film (mixing being the process in which the disparate instrumental channels are combined into the final stereo master) but sometimes the best results come from doing new mixes. For La-La Land’s 3-CD set of TMP, Bruce Botnick, Jerry Goldsmith’s longtime scoring mixer, personally undertook a new album mix.

Pro Tools session for La-La Land’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture album

Television soundtracks can be simpler to assemble compared with the feature films, but they have their own challenges. TV scores by their nature are shorter than feature film scores (with shorter musical selections or “cues”) and the recordings are usually done in a day. However, when producing collections of TV music, vast amounts of tapes need to be transferred owing to the number of episodes. For the 15-CD TOS set, over 100 tapes were utilized. Many of these were the first-generation tapes—the ones that literally came off the ¼'' tape deck at the scoring stage—although in some instances, either due to damage or unavailability, second-generation dubs were used.

Second generation library rolls for the original Star Trek television series

Thankfully for most of these Star Trek projects, finding the right tapes hasn’t been a problem. Modern-day film studios are well aware of the value of their entertainment properties (especially Star Trek) and meticulously archive their production materials. However, after much searching, original scoring master tapes could not be located for The Animated Series. (The production company, Filmation, disbanded years ago and its assets have changed hands several times.) For the new "Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection," the final TAS edited and mixed episode “stems” were used. These tapes are the final mono dubs synchronized to the shows, broken down into three individual channels: dialogue, effects and music. The music channels have edits and volume fluctuations because, by their nature, they’re meant to be played in synch with the episode. With careful listening, editing, and restoration, over 30 minutes of TAS music was recovered and is now available for the first time anywhere.

It wasn’t that long ago that most of this music was sealed away in a vault. Thanks to these labels and Star Trek fans supporting them, fans will be able to listen and enjoy this great music for generations to come.

Listen long and prosper.

Neil S. Bulk is a freelance soundtrack producer. He is an associate producer on Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection and worked on the reconstruction of music from Star Trek: The Animated Series. He can be reached at @nsbulk.

]]>

La-La Land Records is celebrating the 50th anniversary of Star Trek with the release of “Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection — Musical Rarities from Across the Star Trek Universe,” a 4-CD album featuring music from the Star Trek TV series, movies, games and even theme park rides. The album includes the premiere release of the soundtrack to Star Trek: The Animated Series, long requested by fans.

While this set may be viewed as the culmination of Star Trek soundtrack releases, less than 10 years ago it may not have seemed possible. Star Trek debuted in 1966 and spawned a galaxy of collectible products: books, toys, models, clothing, comic books and much more. But what about soundtrack albums? The Original Series had some of the finest music ever composed for television, but while there were a few re-recordings of the theme over the years, it was not until the mid-1980s that a handful of soundtrack albums were released — most of them newly performed (not the actual recordings heard in the show) and featuring only highlights from selected episodes.

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) marked the first time Star Trek fans and music lovers could finally own music heard in an actual Star Trek production. That album was arranged (as were most soundtrack releases of the time) specifically for vinyl, meaning each 20-minute side was designed for an optimum listening experience instead of following the chronological film order. The format of selected highlights (usually out of film sequence) continued for the feature films starring The Original Series and The Next Generation casts, even in the CD era.

In the late 1980s and ’90s, GNP Crescendo Records was the home for Star Trek soundtracks and they did a great job making television albums available from TOS, TNG, DS9 and Voyager — but business realities at the time (particularly involving the musicians union) precluded anything but occasional releases.

Starting in 2009 things began to change. Specialty soundtrack labels like Film Score Monthly, La-La Land Records, Intrada and Varèse Sarabande — as well as GNP Crescendo — began to release “collector’s editions” of the complete scores to the feature films (excepting Star Trek Beyond, which is too recent), along with multi-disc collections from the television series. No longer hindered by the time constraints of an LP or expensive “re-use” fees to the Hollywood session musicians (owing to an important policy change by the musicians union), these limited-edition releases offer the full scores, painstakingly assembled to reflect the music as heard in the productions. Film Score Monthly released a 14-CD box set featuring composer Ron Jones’s music from TNG, while La-La Land Records released the mammoth 15CD set of music from TOS — satisfying many fans who waited nearly 50 years to have all of this music. La-La Land Records has also released multi-disc collections from TNG, DS9 and Enterprise, with a Voyager set scheduled for early 2017.

So how does all of this music get released? First, deals are made between the studios (CBS for the television soundtracks, Paramount Pictures for the features) and, if applicable, the original record label that released the LP or CD. (Usually the original record companies have the soundtrack rights in “perpetuity deals,” meaning they have to be involved.) This can require the studios and labels to dig through paperwork to make sure the original contracts are in order and that all the royalty obligations are understood.

After deals are approved, the studios’ physical elements are requested. These tapes can vary in shape, quantity and configuration. Producing the albums is like re-experiencing technological change, with different analogue and digital tape formats appearing and disappearing over the years. For example, TMP was recorded onto 37 reels of 2'' 16-track analog tape, but by 1991, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country was recorded onto seven 1'' 32-track digital tapes. (Today, music is recorded directly to hard drives with computer software.) The goal is to always go to the earliest, best source.

The original 1” tapes for Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Once the tapes are transferred it’s up to producers, editors, mixers and mastering engineers to shape the final albums. This is like re-assembling a jigsaw puzzle: all of the correct musical takes, choral overlays (if applicable), “sweeteners” and revisions from the scoring process have to be located and reconstituted. The expanded Star Trek CDs have had a remarkable continuity, with many of the same people working on all of the releases (despite the different boutique labels). The goal has always been to present the complete music as heard in the film in film sequence. Ideally the albums present the master mixes made for the film (mixing being the process in which the disparate instrumental channels are combined into the final stereo master) but sometimes the best results come from doing new mixes. For La-La Land’s 3-CD set of TMP, Bruce Botnick, Jerry Goldsmith’s longtime scoring mixer, personally undertook a new album mix.

Pro Tools session for La-La Land’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture album

Television soundtracks can be simpler to assemble compared with the feature films, but they have their own challenges. TV scores by their nature are shorter than feature film scores (with shorter musical selections or “cues”) and the recordings are usually done in a day. However, when producing collections of TV music, vast amounts of tapes need to be transferred owing to the number of episodes. For the 15-CD TOS set, over 100 tapes were utilized. Many of these were the first-generation tapes—the ones that literally came off the ¼'' tape deck at the scoring stage—although in some instances, either due to damage or unavailability, second-generation dubs were used.

Second generation library rolls for the original Star Trek television series

Thankfully for most of these Star Trek projects, finding the right tapes hasn’t been a problem. Modern-day film studios are well aware of the value of their entertainment properties (especially Star Trek) and meticulously archive their production materials. However, after much searching, original scoring master tapes could not be located for The Animated Series. (The production company, Filmation, disbanded years ago and its assets have changed hands several times.) For the new "Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection," the final TAS edited and mixed episode “stems” were used. These tapes are the final mono dubs synchronized to the shows, broken down into three individual channels: dialogue, effects and music. The music channels have edits and volume fluctuations because, by their nature, they’re meant to be played in synch with the episode. With careful listening, editing, and restoration, over 30 minutes of TAS music was recovered and is now available for the first time anywhere.

It wasn’t that long ago that most of this music was sealed away in a vault. Thanks to these labels and Star Trek fans supporting them, fans will be able to listen and enjoy this great music for generations to come.

Listen long and prosper.

Neil S. Bulk is a freelance soundtrack producer. He is an associate producer on Star Trek: 50th Anniversary Collection and worked on the reconstruction of music from Star Trek: The Animated Series. He can be reached at @nsbulk.

]]>
preserving-star-trekundefineds-musical-legacy Fri, 02 Dec 2016 08:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Q's Winter Wonderland]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/qs-winter-wonderland

Greetings, mortals. Q has returned to Star Trek Online to fill your life with mirth and merriment.

As you may know, I am a magnificent historian without peer. I've delved into the ancient histories of those grim warriors -- the Klingons -- to find a new winter celebration for us all to take part in this year. I’m talking, of course, about Klingon Ice Fishing.

I've enlisted the services of one of the greatest Klingon ice fishers alive to show you how it’s done. Speak with him to learn how to fish like a Klingon. Qapla’ and all that.

This year, thanks to Q, players have the chance to learn the secret ice fishing techniques of the Klingons. Join other captains in catching candy fish from beneath the ice over a lake, then offer the fish in an attempt to summon and defeat a giant candy Kos’karii.

Catching the candy fish and putting them in the offering plate during the ice fishing event will reward players with a variety of winter trinkets. Fill the bowl enough and the candy Kos’karii will appear, ready to battle. Defeat it to earn even more festive rewards.

Begin your Ice Fishing adventure by completing a fishing tutorial offered by the Klingon Ice Fishing Master on the shore of the frozen lake. Captains who complete the tutorial will be given a free ice fishing gauntlet to use in the event. More exotic and limited versions of the ice fishing gauntlet will be available for purchase in the Winter Store.

This event will run for fifteen minutes at the bottom of every hour during the Winter Event of 2016.

When the time to fish has come, find honor or a good death. Qapla’!

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>

Greetings, mortals. Q has returned to Star Trek Online to fill your life with mirth and merriment.

As you may know, I am a magnificent historian without peer. I've delved into the ancient histories of those grim warriors -- the Klingons -- to find a new winter celebration for us all to take part in this year. I’m talking, of course, about Klingon Ice Fishing.

I've enlisted the services of one of the greatest Klingon ice fishers alive to show you how it’s done. Speak with him to learn how to fish like a Klingon. Qapla’ and all that.

This year, thanks to Q, players have the chance to learn the secret ice fishing techniques of the Klingons. Join other captains in catching candy fish from beneath the ice over a lake, then offer the fish in an attempt to summon and defeat a giant candy Kos’karii.

Catching the candy fish and putting them in the offering plate during the ice fishing event will reward players with a variety of winter trinkets. Fill the bowl enough and the candy Kos’karii will appear, ready to battle. Defeat it to earn even more festive rewards.

Begin your Ice Fishing adventure by completing a fishing tutorial offered by the Klingon Ice Fishing Master on the shore of the frozen lake. Captains who complete the tutorial will be given a free ice fishing gauntlet to use in the event. More exotic and limited versions of the ice fishing gauntlet will be available for purchase in the Winter Store.

This event will run for fifteen minutes at the bottom of every hour during the Winter Event of 2016.

When the time to fish has come, find honor or a good death. Qapla’!

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>
qs-winter-wonderland Fri, 02 Dec 2016 04:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Remembering DS9 Background Actor Brian Demonbreun, 1959-2016 ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-ds9-background-actor-brian-demonbreun-1959-2016

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Brian Demonbreun, who served as a background actor in more than 50 episodes of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine during its seven-year run and also appeared in a few episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation. According to Memory Alpha, he died on December 1 at the age of 57 following a long illness.

Star Trek Brian Demonbreun

Beyond his time in the Star Trek universe, the California native appeared, uncredited (as either a background extra or behind the scenes as a stand-in), in such other films and televison shows as The Hanoi Hilton, NCIS, Even Money, Balls of Fury and Year of the Dog. He most recently was David Hasselhoff's photo double in Ted 2. Also a videographer and graphic artist, he'd been doing architectural illustrations since 1980 and in 1989 formed his own company, Art Patrol, for which he specialized in black and white and color renderings of houses, existing and from plans.

Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Demonbreun's family, friends and colleagues.

]]>

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Brian Demonbreun, who served as a background actor in more than 50 episodes of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine during its seven-year run and also appeared in a few episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation. According to Memory Alpha, he died on December 1 at the age of 57 following a long illness.

Star Trek Brian Demonbreun

Beyond his time in the Star Trek universe, the California native appeared, uncredited (as either a background extra or behind the scenes as a stand-in), in such other films and televison shows as The Hanoi Hilton, NCIS, Even Money, Balls of Fury and Year of the Dog. He most recently was David Hasselhoff's photo double in Ted 2. Also a videographer and graphic artist, he'd been doing architectural illustrations since 1980 and in 1989 formed his own company, Art Patrol, for which he specialized in black and white and color renderings of houses, existing and from plans.

Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Demonbreun's family, friends and colleagues.

]]>
remembering-ds9-background-actor-brian-demonbreun-1959-2016 Thu, 01 Dec 2016 11:27:06 -0800
<![CDATA[Star Trek Adventures RPG Living Campaign Playtest Launches Today]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/star-trek-adventures-rpg-living-campaign-playtest-launches-today

Star Trek Adventures, a living campaign playtest to develop the first official Star Trek roleplaying game in more than 10 years, launched today. The living playtest comes from Modiphius Entertainment, the publisher behind the popular RPG games Conan, Infinity, Cthulhu and more. A Who’s Who of respected Star Trek authors and game designers teamed up to create Star Trek Adventures, enabling players from all around the world to traverse the Star Trek universe as never before.

The game’s story was written by New York Times bestselling Star Trek author Dayton Ward (Hidden Universe Travel Guide: Vulcan, Star Trek: Waypoint #2) and Scott Pearson (the Trek novellas The More Things Change, Terra Tonight), and developed by Nathan Dowdell (Black Crusade, Mutant Chronicles 3rd Edition) and lead writer David F Chapman (Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space RPG, Buffy the Vampire Slayer RPG). Complementing them is an all-star group that includes writers from all previous editions of the Star Trek roleplaying game, as well as familiar names from across the tabletop gaming industry including:

Shawn Merwin (Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition: War of Everlasting Darkness), Jim Johnson (Lord of the Rings RPG, Mage: The Awakening), Jacob Ross (Legend of the Five Rings, Mongoose Traveller), Patrick Goodman (Shadowrun: Fifth Edition, Shadowrun: Storm Front), Ross Isaacs (Line Developer Star Trek RPG and Star Trek: The Next Generation RPG), Ian Lemke (Changeling: The Dreaming, Earth Down), John Snead (Mindjammer: Traveller, Star Trek: Next Generation RPG), Dan Taylor (IDW’s Trek comics), Bill Maxwell (Fading Suns, Star Trek RPG), Tim Beach (Advanced Dungeons & Dragons) and Andrew Peregrine (Doctor Who, 7th Sea). Among the other talents on board are: Aaron Pollyea, Oz Mills, Ade Smith, Chris Huff, John Kennedy, Kevin Mickelson, Ryan Schoon and Chris Huff.

The Star Trek Adventures playtest gives Trek fans the chance to contribute to the development of the game. They can settle into the captain’s chair, seek out new life and new civilizations, give her all she’s got to a warp core breach, and/or explore their own adventures in the Trek universe.

According to Modiphius, the living campaign begins today with playtest missions and will carry on to the release of a core rulebook in the summer of 2017. The living campaign takes place in the Shackleton Expanse, an area of space vastly unexplored by both the Federation and the Klingons. Starbase 364, Narendra Station, named after the battle of Narendra III where the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-C was destroyed, serves as the keep on the borderlands for excursions out into the frontier of space. As the crews of the U.S.S. Venture, U.S.S. Bellerophon, U.S.S. Thunderchild, explore strange anomalies and discover new life while uncovering an ancient civilization and mysterious technologies, those aboard the U.S.S. Lexington will shape historical events for those very ships.

Captain and officer assignments are still open. And, further, local game shops organizing an in-store playtest group will receive starbase status with pre-order promotions for the game’s retail release. To register yourself or your group, visit www.modiphius.com.

]]>

Star Trek Adventures, a living campaign playtest to develop the first official Star Trek roleplaying game in more than 10 years, launched today. The living playtest comes from Modiphius Entertainment, the publisher behind the popular RPG games Conan, Infinity, Cthulhu and more. A Who’s Who of respected Star Trek authors and game designers teamed up to create Star Trek Adventures, enabling players from all around the world to traverse the Star Trek universe as never before.

The game’s story was written by New York Times bestselling Star Trek author Dayton Ward (Hidden Universe Travel Guide: Vulcan, Star Trek: Waypoint #2) and Scott Pearson (the Trek novellas The More Things Change, Terra Tonight), and developed by Nathan Dowdell (Black Crusade, Mutant Chronicles 3rd Edition) and lead writer David F Chapman (Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space RPG, Buffy the Vampire Slayer RPG). Complementing them is an all-star group that includes writers from all previous editions of the Star Trek roleplaying game, as well as familiar names from across the tabletop gaming industry including:

Shawn Merwin (Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition: War of Everlasting Darkness), Jim Johnson (Lord of the Rings RPG, Mage: The Awakening), Jacob Ross (Legend of the Five Rings, Mongoose Traveller), Patrick Goodman (Shadowrun: Fifth Edition, Shadowrun: Storm Front), Ross Isaacs (Line Developer Star Trek RPG and Star Trek: The Next Generation RPG), Ian Lemke (Changeling: The Dreaming, Earth Down), John Snead (Mindjammer: Traveller, Star Trek: Next Generation RPG), Dan Taylor (IDW’s Trek comics), Bill Maxwell (Fading Suns, Star Trek RPG), Tim Beach (Advanced Dungeons & Dragons) and Andrew Peregrine (Doctor Who, 7th Sea). Among the other talents on board are: Aaron Pollyea, Oz Mills, Ade Smith, Chris Huff, John Kennedy, Kevin Mickelson, Ryan Schoon and Chris Huff.

The Star Trek Adventures playtest gives Trek fans the chance to contribute to the development of the game. They can settle into the captain’s chair, seek out new life and new civilizations, give her all she’s got to a warp core breach, and/or explore their own adventures in the Trek universe.

According to Modiphius, the living campaign begins today with playtest missions and will carry on to the release of a core rulebook in the summer of 2017. The living campaign takes place in the Shackleton Expanse, an area of space vastly unexplored by both the Federation and the Klingons. Starbase 364, Narendra Station, named after the battle of Narendra III where the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-C was destroyed, serves as the keep on the borderlands for excursions out into the frontier of space. As the crews of the U.S.S. Venture, U.S.S. Bellerophon, U.S.S. Thunderchild, explore strange anomalies and discover new life while uncovering an ancient civilization and mysterious technologies, those aboard the U.S.S. Lexington will shape historical events for those very ships.

Captain and officer assignments are still open. And, further, local game shops organizing an in-store playtest group will receive starbase status with pre-order promotions for the game’s retail release. To register yourself or your group, visit www.modiphius.com.

]]>
star-trek-adventures-rpg-living-campaign-playtest-launches-today Thu, 01 Dec 2016 11:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Timelines Available Now to Play on Facebook ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/timelines-available-now-to-play-on-facebook

You asked for it and Disruptor Beam heard you. Star Trek Timelines, previously only available on mobile devices, is now available to play in your web browser through Facebook Games, and on your Windows PC desktop with Facebook Gameroom. Now, whether you’re out exploring the Alpha Quadrant or safe in your crew quarters charging your devices, your crew, fleets, squadrons and events are at your fingertips, ready to explore strange new worlds.

What’s more, you’ll be able to seamlessly switch between devices and computers, taking your crew, your ships, your fleets, your squadrons and the entirety of the Star Trek universe with you.

To get started with the Facebook version of Star Trek Timelines, check out this FAQ on the Disruptor Beam website, visit Star Trek Timelines on Facebook Games or download Facebook Gameroom on your Windows PC.

Available now on the App Store, Google Play, Facebook Games, and Facebook Gameroom, Star Trek Timelines merges the characters, stories and settings from Star Trek: The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. Gather your favorite heroes -- or villains -- to build your dream crew, explore the galaxy and lead Starfleet through a crisis threatening the very fabric of time and space. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates.

]]>

You asked for it and Disruptor Beam heard you. Star Trek Timelines, previously only available on mobile devices, is now available to play in your web browser through Facebook Games, and on your Windows PC desktop with Facebook Gameroom. Now, whether you’re out exploring the Alpha Quadrant or safe in your crew quarters charging your devices, your crew, fleets, squadrons and events are at your fingertips, ready to explore strange new worlds.

What’s more, you’ll be able to seamlessly switch between devices and computers, taking your crew, your ships, your fleets, your squadrons and the entirety of the Star Trek universe with you.

To get started with the Facebook version of Star Trek Timelines, check out this FAQ on the Disruptor Beam website, visit Star Trek Timelines on Facebook Games or download Facebook Gameroom on your Windows PC.

Available now on the App Store, Google Play, Facebook Games, and Facebook Gameroom, Star Trek Timelines merges the characters, stories and settings from Star Trek: The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. Gather your favorite heroes -- or villains -- to build your dream crew, explore the galaxy and lead Starfleet through a crisis threatening the very fabric of time and space. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for the latest updates.

]]>
timelines-available-now-to-play-on-facebook Thu, 01 Dec 2016 08:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[The Examined Life is the Only One Worth Living]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/the-examined-life-is-the-only-one-worth-living

Star Trek is a show about ideas. It is often full of action, suspense, drama, and humor. But at its core, Star Trek communicates ideas about human life through the experiences, relationships, tragedies and explorations of the universe narrated/explored through its characters. In each of these encounters with alien species, space anomalies or with fellow crew members, something of the human condition is conveyed. I hope to explore some of these, along with the myriad fans of Star Trek, and come to know something more about the phenomenon we love and to know more about ourselves as well. In my professional life I teach philosophy and so I will carry out these musings in conversation with some of the key thinkers in philosophy and history.

Picard in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

One of my favorite episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation is “Tapestry.” This episode has everything I mentioned above. It has the erratic and often humorous behavior of Q, some ornery Nausicaans, romantic interests, great fights, wonderful character development and suspense. The opening scene sees the stalwart and stoic Captain Jean-Luc Picard die in sickbay resulting from a weapon’s blast. The artificial heart he received in his youth gave out and he could not be saved. The omnipotent Q visits Picard in what appears to be the afterlife and asks whether there is regret in the captain’s life. It’s a poignant inquisition, as the tormented voices of those who have died, either through the action or inaction of Picard throughout his life, echo in the background. Q offers Picard an opportunity to make peace with his “sordid” past. He can alter the past in order to avoid the violent encounter with the surly Nausicaans in his youth to keep his natural heart and thus save his future life.

Q and Picard in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Picard is nothing if not an enlightened individual, and he laments that his youthful life was filled with “far too much ego” and “too little wisdom.” Rather than seeing an untimely end to his life, Picard is sent to the past and, in the course of events, a mature captain attempts to convince his youthful, ensign companions to not seek revenge on the cheating Nausicaans. He attempts to make them see that the risk is too great and the potential benefit not worth the potential loss. During his attempts to correct his youth, Picard manages to alienate his closest friends. He refuses to come to the aid of his mate, Cortin Zweller, and in doing so betrays the friendship which is based on years of comaraderie, shared experience and mutual support. They used to have one another’s backs, not one another’s consensus. In different ways, he explores the “what if” person in his life, Marta. However, in being willing to romantically explore what did not originally occur, the mature Picard does not anticipate the response of youth to the discomforting change of a friendship. This, too, is lost and cannot be recovered. Ultimately, Picard avoids the fateful combat with the Nausicaans, but the cost in terms of friendships is high. The cost is also high in terms of his own life. The outcome of being overly cautious and losing youthful zeal is not only that Picard’s career suffers. Even more so, he loses himself. The dreary lieutenant from astrophysics is a shell of the person Picard is and a caricature of the life he knows as his own.

Cortin Zweller in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Picard is given an opportunity that many would relish. As we mature, it is common to look back at points in our life and reflect on the choices we made and the things we’ve done. Depending on the nature of the events in mind we might swell with pride, wince with regret or even feel the pangs of shame. It is easy to examine our past from the standpoint of maturity and have some regrets. If we are caught in similar circumstances today, we act differently than we did in our youth. In Plato’s Apology, Socrates stands trial for denying the gods, corrupting the youth and for being politically disruptive (activities well known to philosophers!). Socrates discusses the option of avoiding execution by choosing a life of silence where his questions and his explorations in virtue will no longer prove to be a menace to the stability of Athenian society. He is given the opportunity to go on living, and all he has to do is avoid his life’s passion and abandon his inquiries. It is here that Socrates offers his famous dictum, “the unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates cannot take up the offer of the Athenian authorities. He cannot remain silent. He must continue his searches because it is these inquiries that make his life worthwhile.

Picard talks to Q in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Ancient philosophers discussed this in the Socratic idea of the unity of the virtues. A person cannot simply be just or merciful, generous or patient without having the other virtues accompanying them. One must be resolute and have self-discipline in order to gain wisdom. One must be patient to be steadfast and one must be humble to learn knowledge. In other words, a complete life is needed in order to have a life that is worthwhile. Picard could not become the wise captain without reflecting critically on his impetuous youth. He could not courageously take command of the Stargazer when it was needed without taking the risks of getting into fights over games of dom-jot. He could not know that life is a fleeting thing that merits our making the most of every second without nearly losing that life before it reached fulfillment. These moments shaped who he became and gave him the life worth living. Without those moments of regret and the brash arrogance of his youth his life becomes tedious and wearisome. The normally stoic Picard cries out, “I cannot live out my days as that person. That man is bereft of passion and imagination. I am not that man!” He would rather die on Dr. Crusher’s table than live as the person he became after he changed his youth.

Picard is surrounded by his crew in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

In this moment, Picard learns something of immense importance. He learns that living well is less about having a life without blemishes as it is about reflecting upon the complexities and conflicts of one’s life and learning from it. What is important, for both Picard and Socrates, is that we examine our lives with its imperfections rather than constructing perfect lives. It’s the willingness to confront ourselves and grow that matters. Picard doesn’t try to justify his youth, nor do his opinions change about it. In the end, he still thinks he was brash and arrogant as an ensign. But he comes to recognize that our well-being and maturation hinge upon our openness to acknowledge our flaws and learn from them. For Picard, Socrates and us, the process of learning from our lives is superior to having spotless lives. In fact, it appears that the examined life is the only one worth living.

Timothy Harvie is Associate Professor of philosophy and ethics at St. Mary's University in Calgary, Canada. His interests lie primarily in philosophical theology, political philosophy, environmental and animal philosophies, and ideas of the role of hope in society. He is a lifelong Star Trek fan. Check out his website at www.stmu.ca/dr-timothy-harvie.

]]>

Star Trek is a show about ideas. It is often full of action, suspense, drama, and humor. But at its core, Star Trek communicates ideas about human life through the experiences, relationships, tragedies and explorations of the universe narrated/explored through its characters. In each of these encounters with alien species, space anomalies or with fellow crew members, something of the human condition is conveyed. I hope to explore some of these, along with the myriad fans of Star Trek, and come to know something more about the phenomenon we love and to know more about ourselves as well. In my professional life I teach philosophy and so I will carry out these musings in conversation with some of the key thinkers in philosophy and history.

Picard in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

One of my favorite episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation is “Tapestry.” This episode has everything I mentioned above. It has the erratic and often humorous behavior of Q, some ornery Nausicaans, romantic interests, great fights, wonderful character development and suspense. The opening scene sees the stalwart and stoic Captain Jean-Luc Picard die in sickbay resulting from a weapon’s blast. The artificial heart he received in his youth gave out and he could not be saved. The omnipotent Q visits Picard in what appears to be the afterlife and asks whether there is regret in the captain’s life. It’s a poignant inquisition, as the tormented voices of those who have died, either through the action or inaction of Picard throughout his life, echo in the background. Q offers Picard an opportunity to make peace with his “sordid” past. He can alter the past in order to avoid the violent encounter with the surly Nausicaans in his youth to keep his natural heart and thus save his future life.

Q and Picard in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Picard is nothing if not an enlightened individual, and he laments that his youthful life was filled with “far too much ego” and “too little wisdom.” Rather than seeing an untimely end to his life, Picard is sent to the past and, in the course of events, a mature captain attempts to convince his youthful, ensign companions to not seek revenge on the cheating Nausicaans. He attempts to make them see that the risk is too great and the potential benefit not worth the potential loss. During his attempts to correct his youth, Picard manages to alienate his closest friends. He refuses to come to the aid of his mate, Cortin Zweller, and in doing so betrays the friendship which is based on years of comaraderie, shared experience and mutual support. They used to have one another’s backs, not one another’s consensus. In different ways, he explores the “what if” person in his life, Marta. However, in being willing to romantically explore what did not originally occur, the mature Picard does not anticipate the response of youth to the discomforting change of a friendship. This, too, is lost and cannot be recovered. Ultimately, Picard avoids the fateful combat with the Nausicaans, but the cost in terms of friendships is high. The cost is also high in terms of his own life. The outcome of being overly cautious and losing youthful zeal is not only that Picard’s career suffers. Even more so, he loses himself. The dreary lieutenant from astrophysics is a shell of the person Picard is and a caricature of the life he knows as his own.

Cortin Zweller in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Picard is given an opportunity that many would relish. As we mature, it is common to look back at points in our life and reflect on the choices we made and the things we’ve done. Depending on the nature of the events in mind we might swell with pride, wince with regret or even feel the pangs of shame. It is easy to examine our past from the standpoint of maturity and have some regrets. If we are caught in similar circumstances today, we act differently than we did in our youth. In Plato’s Apology, Socrates stands trial for denying the gods, corrupting the youth and for being politically disruptive (activities well known to philosophers!). Socrates discusses the option of avoiding execution by choosing a life of silence where his questions and his explorations in virtue will no longer prove to be a menace to the stability of Athenian society. He is given the opportunity to go on living, and all he has to do is avoid his life’s passion and abandon his inquiries. It is here that Socrates offers his famous dictum, “the unexamined life is not worth living.” Socrates cannot take up the offer of the Athenian authorities. He cannot remain silent. He must continue his searches because it is these inquiries that make his life worthwhile.

Picard talks to Q in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

Ancient philosophers discussed this in the Socratic idea of the unity of the virtues. A person cannot simply be just or merciful, generous or patient without having the other virtues accompanying them. One must be resolute and have self-discipline in order to gain wisdom. One must be patient to be steadfast and one must be humble to learn knowledge. In other words, a complete life is needed in order to have a life that is worthwhile. Picard could not become the wise captain without reflecting critically on his impetuous youth. He could not courageously take command of the Stargazer when it was needed without taking the risks of getting into fights over games of dom-jot. He could not know that life is a fleeting thing that merits our making the most of every second without nearly losing that life before it reached fulfillment. These moments shaped who he became and gave him the life worth living. Without those moments of regret and the brash arrogance of his youth his life becomes tedious and wearisome. The normally stoic Picard cries out, “I cannot live out my days as that person. That man is bereft of passion and imagination. I am not that man!” He would rather die on Dr. Crusher’s table than live as the person he became after he changed his youth.

Picard is surrounded by his crew in Star Trek: TNG "Tapestry"

In this moment, Picard learns something of immense importance. He learns that living well is less about having a life without blemishes as it is about reflecting upon the complexities and conflicts of one’s life and learning from it. What is important, for both Picard and Socrates, is that we examine our lives with its imperfections rather than constructing perfect lives. It’s the willingness to confront ourselves and grow that matters. Picard doesn’t try to justify his youth, nor do his opinions change about it. In the end, he still thinks he was brash and arrogant as an ensign. But he comes to recognize that our well-being and maturation hinge upon our openness to acknowledge our flaws and learn from them. For Picard, Socrates and us, the process of learning from our lives is superior to having spotless lives. In fact, it appears that the examined life is the only one worth living.

Timothy Harvie is Associate Professor of philosophy and ethics at St. Mary's University in Calgary, Canada. His interests lie primarily in philosophical theology, political philosophy, environmental and animal philosophies, and ideas of the role of hope in society. He is a lifelong Star Trek fan. Check out his website at www.stmu.ca/dr-timothy-harvie.

]]>
the-examined-life-is-the-only-one-worth-living Wed, 30 Nov 2016 08:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Picardo, Braga Reunite for Salem]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/picardo-braga-reunite-for-salem

Star Trek: Voyager's Robert Picardo tackles a very, very different role today on WGN's creepy series, Salem. The actor, sporting a scruffy beard and long white hair, guest stars as a character named Mr. Stoughton in the third-season episode, "Night's Black Agents." Picardo, of course, reunites with another familiar Trek figure on Salem. His old Voyager boss, Brannon Braga, is Salem's co-creator and executive producer/show runner, as well as one of its writers.

Here's the official synopsis of the episode: In “Night’s Black Agents” – written by Brannon Braga & Adam Simon and directed by Joe Dante (Gremlins) – Cotton desperately tries to escape to Boston before Anne or the Boy’s followers track him down. He comes across Tituba, who shows him a vision of his future, ultimately changing his decision to leave. Mary realizes that even without her witch powers, she can still use her femininity to manipulate those around her. Meanwhile, Alden and Billy continue the fight on the outskirts of Salem.

Robert Picardo as Mr. Stoughton in Salem

Picardo, in a quick conversation with StarTrek.com, said: "I loved working on Salem with my longtime friends Brannon Braga and Joe Dante. Plus, it was great to have hair again, however briefly. I looked like an evil Ben Franklin."

]]>

Star Trek: Voyager's Robert Picardo tackles a very, very different role today on WGN's creepy series, Salem. The actor, sporting a scruffy beard and long white hair, guest stars as a character named Mr. Stoughton in the third-season episode, "Night's Black Agents." Picardo, of course, reunites with another familiar Trek figure on Salem. His old Voyager boss, Brannon Braga, is Salem's co-creator and executive producer/show runner, as well as one of its writers.

Here's the official synopsis of the episode: In “Night’s Black Agents” – written by Brannon Braga & Adam Simon and directed by Joe Dante (Gremlins) – Cotton desperately tries to escape to Boston before Anne or the Boy’s followers track him down. He comes across Tituba, who shows him a vision of his future, ultimately changing his decision to leave. Mary realizes that even without her witch powers, she can still use her femininity to manipulate those around her. Meanwhile, Alden and Billy continue the fight on the outskirts of Salem.

Robert Picardo as Mr. Stoughton in Salem

Picardo, in a quick conversation with StarTrek.com, said: "I loved working on Salem with my longtime friends Brannon Braga and Joe Dante. Plus, it was great to have hair again, however briefly. I looked like an evil Ben Franklin."

]]>
picardo-braga-reunite-for-salem Wed, 30 Nov 2016 02:28:05 -0800
<![CDATA[Titan's 50 Years of Star Trek, Vol. 2, Out Now]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/titans-50-years-of-star-trek-vol-2-out-now

"Fifty Years of Star Trek," Titan Magazines' second volume of archive material, charts the amazing story behind the making of the iconic sci-fi franchise, as told by the people closest to it: the stars of the shows and movies.

 

Covering every incarnation of Star Trek, from The Original Series to Enterprise and the Trek feature films, "Fifty Years of Star Trek" features classic archive interviews with leading cast members, including William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Marina Sirtis, Kate Mulgrew, Jeri Ryan, Scott Bakula, and many more. Fans will also discover how actors Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, and the other stars of the recent movies made the characters their own.

For more information or to get your copy now, go to www.titan-comics.com.

]]>

"Fifty Years of Star Trek," Titan Magazines' second volume of archive material, charts the amazing story behind the making of the iconic sci-fi franchise, as told by the people closest to it: the stars of the shows and movies.

 

Covering every incarnation of Star Trek, from The Original Series to Enterprise and the Trek feature films, "Fifty Years of Star Trek" features classic archive interviews with leading cast members, including William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Marina Sirtis, Kate Mulgrew, Jeri Ryan, Scott Bakula, and many more. Fans will also discover how actors Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana, and the other stars of the recent movies made the characters their own.

For more information or to get your copy now, go to www.titan-comics.com.

]]>
titans-50-years-of-star-trek-vol-2-out-now Tue, 29 Nov 2016 11:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Star Trek: Discovery Beams Up Three Cast Members]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/star-trek-discovery-beams-up-three-cast-members

Doug Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Anthony Rapp have been announced as the first three actors cast for Star Trek: Discovery.

Star Trek: Discovery, Doug Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Anthony Rapp

Jones will play Lt. Saru, a Starfleet science officer and an alien species new to the Star Trek universe. He is a respected actor with a large following of sci-fi and horror fans as a result of his creature performances in the likes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Hellboy, Legion, Pan’s Labyrinth and The Strain. 

Yeoh is set to play Captain Georgiou, the Starfleet captain aboard the starship Shenzhou. She is an internationally known actress and action star whose many credits include Tomorrow Never Dies and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Rapp will beam aboard as Lt. Stamets, an astromycologist, fungus expert and Starfleet science officer on the starship Discovery. He is best known for his stage work in such Broadway productions as Rent, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown and If/Then, and also counts among his films credits School Ties, A Beautiful Mind and Rent.

Star Trek: Discovery is coming to CBS All Access in May 2017, following the premiere on the CBS Television Network, and will be distributed concurrently on Netflix in 188 countries and through Bell Media in Canada.

]]>

Doug Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Anthony Rapp have been announced as the first three actors cast for Star Trek: Discovery.

Star Trek: Discovery, Doug Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Anthony Rapp

Jones will play Lt. Saru, a Starfleet science officer and an alien species new to the Star Trek universe. He is a respected actor with a large following of sci-fi and horror fans as a result of his creature performances in the likes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Hellboy, Legion, Pan’s Labyrinth and The Strain. 

Yeoh is set to play Captain Georgiou, the Starfleet captain aboard the starship Shenzhou. She is an internationally known actress and action star whose many credits include Tomorrow Never Dies and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Rapp will beam aboard as Lt. Stamets, an astromycologist, fungus expert and Starfleet science officer on the starship Discovery. He is best known for his stage work in such Broadway productions as Rent, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown and If/Then, and also counts among his films credits School Ties, A Beautiful Mind and Rent.

Star Trek: Discovery is coming to CBS All Access in May 2017, following the premiere on the CBS Television Network, and will be distributed concurrently on Netflix in 188 countries and through Bell Media in Canada.

]]>
star-trek-discovery-beams-up-three-cast-members Tue, 29 Nov 2016 10:31:44 -0800
<![CDATA[Prey Trilogy Concludes Tomorrow with The Hall of Heroes ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/prey-trilogy-concludes-tomorrow-with-the-hall-of-heroes

John Jackson Miller's acclaimed Star Trek: Prey trilogy will warp to its conclusion tomorrow when Simon and Schuster/Pocket Books releases Book 3: The Hall of Heroes. The Hall of Heroes follows on the events of Book 1: Hell's Heart and Book 2: The Jackal's Trick just yet. Here's the synopsis of The Hall of Heroes:

The Klingon Empire stands on the precipice. In the wake of violence from the cult known as the Unsung, paranoia threatens to break Chancellor Martok’s regime. Klingons increasingly call for a stronger hand to take control . . . one that Lord Korgh, master manipulator, is only too willing to offer.

But other forces are now in motion. Assisted by a wily agent, the Empire’s enemies conspire to take full advantage of the situation. Aboard the U.S.S. Titan, Admiral William T. Riker realizes far more than the Federation’s alliance with the Klingons is in danger. With the Empire a wounded animal, it could become either an attacker—or a target.

Yet even as hostilities increase, Worf returns to the U.S.S. Enterprise and Captain Jean-Luc Picard with a daring plan of his own. The preservation of both the Empire and its alliance with the Federation may hinge on an improbable savior leading a most unlikely force...

Star Trek: Prey, Book 3: The Hall of Heroes, which runs 352 pages, will be available as a mass market paperback and eBook priced at $7.99 in the U.S. and $10.99 in Canada. Go to www.simonandschuster.com to pre-order it and also Book 1 and Book 2.

]]>

John Jackson Miller's acclaimed Star Trek: Prey trilogy will warp to its conclusion tomorrow when Simon and Schuster/Pocket Books releases Book 3: The Hall of Heroes. The Hall of Heroes follows on the events of Book 1: Hell's Heart and Book 2: The Jackal's Trick just yet. Here's the synopsis of The Hall of Heroes:

The Klingon Empire stands on the precipice. In the wake of violence from the cult known as the Unsung, paranoia threatens to break Chancellor Martok’s regime. Klingons increasingly call for a stronger hand to take control . . . one that Lord Korgh, master manipulator, is only too willing to offer.

But other forces are now in motion. Assisted by a wily agent, the Empire’s enemies conspire to take full advantage of the situation. Aboard the U.S.S. Titan, Admiral William T. Riker realizes far more than the Federation’s alliance with the Klingons is in danger. With the Empire a wounded animal, it could become either an attacker—or a target.

Yet even as hostilities increase, Worf returns to the U.S.S. Enterprise and Captain Jean-Luc Picard with a daring plan of his own. The preservation of both the Empire and its alliance with the Federation may hinge on an improbable savior leading a most unlikely force...

Star Trek: Prey, Book 3: The Hall of Heroes, which runs 352 pages, will be available as a mass market paperback and eBook priced at $7.99 in the U.S. and $10.99 in Canada. Go to www.simonandschuster.com to pre-order it and also Book 1 and Book 2.

]]>
prey-trilogy-concludes-tomorrow-with-the-hall-of-heroes Mon, 28 Nov 2016 08:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Remembering DS9 Guest Star Fritz Weaver, 1926-2016]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-ds9-guest-star-fritz-weaver-1926-2016

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of veteran character actor Fritz Weaver, who died on November 26 at the age of 90 at his home in New York City. Weaver portrayed Kovat, the Cardassian public conservator who represented O'Brien, in the Deep Space Nine episode "Tribunal."

Born in Pittsburgh, Weaver's many, many film and television credits included two episodes of The Twilight Zone, Fail Safe, Mission: Impossible, The Day of the Dolphin, Marathon Man, Demon Seed, The Legend of Lizzie Borden (earning Weaver an Emmy nomination), Holocaust (earning Weaver another Emmy nomination), The Martian Chronicles, Creepshow, The X-Files, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Cobbler and The Congressman, the latter two released respectively in 2014 and 2016. He was also a respected stage actor, winning the Tony Award in 1970 as Best Actor in a Play for his performance in Child's Play, and narrated numerous History Channel productions.

Weaver is survived by his wife, Rochelle, daughter, Lydia, and son, Anthony, as well as a grandson. Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Weaver's family, friends, fans and colleagues.

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StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of veteran character actor Fritz Weaver, who died on November 26 at the age of 90 at his home in New York City. Weaver portrayed Kovat, the Cardassian public conservator who represented O'Brien, in the Deep Space Nine episode "Tribunal."

Born in Pittsburgh, Weaver's many, many film and television credits included two episodes of The Twilight Zone, Fail Safe, Mission: Impossible, The Day of the Dolphin, Marathon Man, Demon Seed, The Legend of Lizzie Borden (earning Weaver an Emmy nomination), Holocaust (earning Weaver another Emmy nomination), The Martian Chronicles, Creepshow, The X-Files, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Cobbler and The Congressman, the latter two released respectively in 2014 and 2016. He was also a respected stage actor, winning the Tony Award in 1970 as Best Actor in a Play for his performance in Child's Play, and narrated numerous History Channel productions.

Weaver is survived by his wife, Rochelle, daughter, Lydia, and son, Anthony, as well as a grandson. Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Weaver's family, friends, fans and colleagues.

]]>
remembering-ds9-guest-star-fritz-weaver-1926-2016 Sun, 27 Nov 2016 20:14:21 -0800
<![CDATA[DS9's "Our Man Bashir," 21 Years Later]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/ds9s-our-man-bashir-21-years-later

"Our Man Bashir," one of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's most-entertaining hours, aired on November 27, 1995 -- or a mind-boggling 21 years ago today. The episode, in which the DS9 crew replaced the characters in Dr. Bashir's secret-agent holosuite program following a transporter issue (rather than a holosuite malfunction), was pure 007-style fun. StarTrek.com takes a Bond, er, fond look back at "Our Man Bashir" with these details, figures and anecdotes:

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Bashir in Star Trek: DS9

Ronald D. Moore wrote "Our Man Bashir" based on a story pitch by Robert Gillan. The late Winrich Kolbe directed the episode.

The episode's working title was "Untitled Holosuite."

Bashir and Garak in Star Trek: DS9

"Our Man Bashir" had the distinction of having the single-longest shoot -- nine days, vesus the usual seven -- of any DS9 episode. That was due mostly to the unusually high number of intricate stunts and the many detailed sets the episode required.

Best line: "Bashir. Julian Bashir."

Nana Visitor and Siddig in Star Trek: DS9

Alexander Siddig and Nana Visitor -- who later married and divorced -- were dating when they filmed "Our Man Bashir," thus their obvious chemistry. Actually, Visitor noted in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, "It was the first episode we did after Sid and I got together as a couple."

Mona Luvsitt and Honey Bare are clear homages to the names of old-school Bond females.

 Dr. Noah? Enough said, right?

According to Memory Alpha, via the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, "Although Ronald D. Moore attempted to avoid directly referencing any of his primary influences, it seems that some names and situations skated a little too close for comfort. After this episode aired, the producers go an angry letter from MGM, the studio which holds the rights to the James Bond property. The DS9 Companion doesn't reveal the content of the letter other than to say, 'apparently MGM did not find imitation to be the sincerest form of flattery.' As such, in the fifth season espisode 'A Simple Investigation,' which returns to Bashir's holonovel, the references to Bond are far more subtle."

Other influences on the episode included The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Wild Wild West, Our Man Flint (note the similarity to the title of the episode) and Matt Helm.

Which DS9 regular did not appear in this installment? That'd be Cirroc Lofton.

Another great line, this one uttered by Garak: "Kiss the girl, get the key. They never taught me that in the Obsidian Order."

Marci Brickhouse, who played Mona Luvsitt, later guest starred on Suddenly Susan, Baywatch, Boy Meets World, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Dragnet, among other shows. These days, she works as an artist.

Perhaps not so coincidentally, "Our Man Bashir" debuted a mere 10 days after GoldenEye, the first Bond film in six years, opened in theaters.

"I think it's safe to say that Julian Bashir, secret agent, will return," Bashir tells Garak at the end of the episode, yet another tip of the cap to the Bond films.

Terry Farrell as Dax in Star Trek: DS9

"Our Man Bashir" earned two Emmy Award nominations: Outstanding Hairstyling for a Series and Outstanding Music Composition for a Series (Jay Chattaway).

"I think 'Our Man Bashir' was probably one of the most-important episodes in terms of changing attitudes towards Bashir," Siddig told StarTrek.com in September 2016, referring to the fact that, for a long time, he felt Bashir was an "unpopular" character. "I think that was probably one of the most-influential episodes. I don’t know if it’s one of the best, but it is certainly super-influential. I remember opinions began to change after that episode. So that would probably be an important one, historically."

]]>

"Our Man Bashir," one of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's most-entertaining hours, aired on November 27, 1995 -- or a mind-boggling 21 years ago today. The episode, in which the DS9 crew replaced the characters in Dr. Bashir's secret-agent holosuite program following a transporter issue (rather than a holosuite malfunction), was pure 007-style fun. StarTrek.com takes a Bond, er, fond look back at "Our Man Bashir" with these details, figures and anecdotes:

Alexander Siddig as Dr. Bashir in Star Trek: DS9

Ronald D. Moore wrote "Our Man Bashir" based on a story pitch by Robert Gillan. The late Winrich Kolbe directed the episode.

The episode's working title was "Untitled Holosuite."

Bashir and Garak in Star Trek: DS9

"Our Man Bashir" had the distinction of having the single-longest shoot -- nine days, vesus the usual seven -- of any DS9 episode. That was due mostly to the unusually high number of intricate stunts and the many detailed sets the episode required.

Best line: "Bashir. Julian Bashir."

Nana Visitor and Siddig in Star Trek: DS9

Alexander Siddig and Nana Visitor -- who later married and divorced -- were dating when they filmed "Our Man Bashir," thus their obvious chemistry. Actually, Visitor noted in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, "It was the first episode we did after Sid and I got together as a couple."

Mona Luvsitt and Honey Bare are clear homages to the names of old-school Bond females.

 Dr. Noah? Enough said, right?

According to Memory Alpha, via the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, "Although Ronald D. Moore attempted to avoid directly referencing any of his primary influences, it seems that some names and situations skated a little too close for comfort. After this episode aired, the producers go an angry letter from MGM, the studio which holds the rights to the James Bond property. The DS9 Companion doesn't reveal the content of the letter other than to say, 'apparently MGM did not find imitation to be the sincerest form of flattery.' As such, in the fifth season espisode 'A Simple Investigation,' which returns to Bashir's holonovel, the references to Bond are far more subtle."

Other influences on the episode included The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Wild Wild West, Our Man Flint (note the similarity to the title of the episode) and Matt Helm.

Which DS9 regular did not appear in this installment? That'd be Cirroc Lofton.

Another great line, this one uttered by Garak: "Kiss the girl, get the key. They never taught me that in the Obsidian Order."

Marci Brickhouse, who played Mona Luvsitt, later guest starred on Suddenly Susan, Baywatch, Boy Meets World, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Dragnet, among other shows. These days, she works as an artist.

Perhaps not so coincidentally, "Our Man Bashir" debuted a mere 10 days after GoldenEye, the first Bond film in six years, opened in theaters.

"I think it's safe to say that Julian Bashir, secret agent, will return," Bashir tells Garak at the end of the episode, yet another tip of the cap to the Bond films.

Terry Farrell as Dax in Star Trek: DS9

"Our Man Bashir" earned two Emmy Award nominations: Outstanding Hairstyling for a Series and Outstanding Music Composition for a Series (Jay Chattaway).

"I think 'Our Man Bashir' was probably one of the most-important episodes in terms of changing attitudes towards Bashir," Siddig told StarTrek.com in September 2016, referring to the fact that, for a long time, he felt Bashir was an "unpopular" character. "I think that was probably one of the most-influential episodes. I don’t know if it’s one of the best, but it is certainly super-influential. I remember opinions began to change after that episode. So that would probably be an important one, historically."

]]>
ds9s-our-man-bashir-21-years-later Sun, 27 Nov 2016 05:38:34 -0800
<![CDATA[Ship You'd Want To Take You Home For Holidays Is...]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/ship-youd-want-to-take-you-home-for-holidays-is

Which ship would you trust to take you home for the holidays? That was the question StarTrek.com posed for our latest weekly polls. Fans could choose from the following options: Enterprise E, Enterprise D, Defiant, Voyager, Excelsior or Prometheus. More than 4,000 fans voted, and here are the results:

Enterprise D (30%)

Enterprise E (28%)

Voyager (19%)

Defiant (16%)

Prometheus (4%)

Excelsior (3%)

And how did YOUR ship of choice fare?

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Which ship would you trust to take you home for the holidays? That was the question StarTrek.com posed for our latest weekly polls. Fans could choose from the following options: Enterprise E, Enterprise D, Defiant, Voyager, Excelsior or Prometheus. More than 4,000 fans voted, and here are the results:

Enterprise D (30%)

Enterprise E (28%)

Voyager (19%)

Defiant (16%)

Prometheus (4%)

Excelsior (3%)

And how did YOUR ship of choice fare?

]]>
ship-youd-want-to-take-you-home-for-holidays-is Sun, 27 Nov 2016 04:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[Remembering Voyager Guest Ron Glass, 1945-2016]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-voyager-guest-ron-glass-1945-2016

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Emmy Award-nominated actor Ron Glass, whose credits included a long run as Detective Ron Harris on Barney Miller, as well as the series-regular role of Shepherd Derrial Book on Firefly (and in the film Serenity), and one trip to the Star Trek universe. Glass guest starred as Loken on the Voyager episode "Nightingale." He was 71 at the time of his passing on November 25, according to Variety, though the location and cause of his death had not yet be confirmed.

Star Trek Voyager Ron Glass

In "Nightingale," Loken was a Kraylor who faked being a doctor, fooling Harry Kim. It turned out that Loken was actually a scientist who'd created a cloaking device that his people could use in their effort to overcome a blockade of their planet by the Annari. "Nightingale" aired in November 2000, and was the eighth episode of Voyager's seventh season.

Barney Miller Ron Miller

Beyond Voyager, Barney Miller and Firefly/Serenity, Glass appeared in such other films and television shows as Sanford and Son, Hawaii Five-O, All in the Family, The Bob Newhart Show, The New Odd Couple, Amen, Family Matters, Houseguest, Friends, Lakeview Terrace, Shark, CSI: NY, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Major Crimes and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. He also lent his voice to the popular animated series Rugrats and All Grown Up!

Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Glass's family, friends and colleagues.

]]>

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Emmy Award-nominated actor Ron Glass, whose credits included a long run as Detective Ron Harris on Barney Miller, as well as the series-regular role of Shepherd Derrial Book on Firefly (and in the film Serenity), and one trip to the Star Trek universe. Glass guest starred as Loken on the Voyager episode "Nightingale." He was 71 at the time of his passing on November 25, according to Variety, though the location and cause of his death had not yet be confirmed.

Star Trek Voyager Ron Glass

In "Nightingale," Loken was a Kraylor who faked being a doctor, fooling Harry Kim. It turned out that Loken was actually a scientist who'd created a cloaking device that his people could use in their effort to overcome a blockade of their planet by the Annari. "Nightingale" aired in November 2000, and was the eighth episode of Voyager's seventh season.

Barney Miller Ron Miller

Beyond Voyager, Barney Miller and Firefly/Serenity, Glass appeared in such other films and television shows as Sanford and Son, Hawaii Five-O, All in the Family, The Bob Newhart Show, The New Odd Couple, Amen, Family Matters, Houseguest, Friends, Lakeview Terrace, Shark, CSI: NY, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Major Crimes and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. He also lent his voice to the popular animated series Rugrats and All Grown Up!

Please join StarTrek.com in offering our condolences to Glass's family, friends and colleagues.

]]>
remembering-voyager-guest-ron-glass-1945-2016 Sat, 26 Nov 2016 16:43:31 -0800
<![CDATA[Schematic Illuminated Display Available Now ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/schematic-illuminated-display-available-now

If you've always wanted Star Trek's cool illuminated schematic displays in your home, well, you're time has come. ThinkGeek has introduced the Star Trek Schematic Illuminated Display, which offers two interchangeable, engraved, acrylic plates - one for The Original Series, one for The Next Generation. The plates sit on a base powered either by USB or three AA batteries, depending on your setup. The base contains LED lights and the LED lights glow in seven color cycles.

The Star Trek Schematic Illuminated Display measures 10 1/2" wide x 8 1/2" tall, including the base. Available now at ThinkGeek.com, it costs $49.99.

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If you've always wanted Star Trek's cool illuminated schematic displays in your home, well, you're time has come. ThinkGeek has introduced the Star Trek Schematic Illuminated Display, which offers two interchangeable, engraved, acrylic plates - one for The Original Series, one for The Next Generation. The plates sit on a base powered either by USB or three AA batteries, depending on your setup. The base contains LED lights and the LED lights glow in seven color cycles.

The Star Trek Schematic Illuminated Display measures 10 1/2" wide x 8 1/2" tall, including the base. Available now at ThinkGeek.com, it costs $49.99.

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schematic-illuminated-display-available-now Sat, 26 Nov 2016 04:30:28 -0800