Star Trek Latest News http://startrek.com Star Trek Latest News Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:49:20 -0700 info@startrek.com (Star Trek Team) en <![CDATA[Who Wore It Better? -- Trek Cats Edition]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/who-wore-it-better-trek-cats-edition

Captain’s Log: We have entered a galaxy where beloved illustrator Jenny Parks has conjured an astonishingly vivid homage to Star Trek: The Original Series with an unexpected twist: a cast of cats. Star Trek Cats is a new take on the iconic characters and scenes, from Kirk in the Captain’s chair to Spock offering his Vulcan wisdom.

The cat-filled scenes leave us with just one question: who wore it better? Set phasers to stun-ning.


Captain James T. Kirk OR this Orange Tabby?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Captain’s Log. Our position, orbiting Psi 2000.”


Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott OR this Scottish Fold?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek


Science Officer and First Officer Spock OR this Oriental Shorthair?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Live long and prosper.”


Lt. Commander Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy OR this Gray-and-White Longhair?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“I’m not a magician, Spock, just an old country doctor.”


Lieutenant Nyota Uhura OR this Burmese?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Incoming communication, Captain.”


Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu OR this Japanese Bobtail?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Fear not, fair lady!”


– – –

Feline or not, we can all agree that Star Trek has never looked so good. You can find Star Trek Cats at www.Chroniclebooks.com, and get 25% off, plus free shipping, with the code ENERGIZE.

 

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Captain’s Log: We have entered a galaxy where beloved illustrator Jenny Parks has conjured an astonishingly vivid homage to Star Trek: The Original Series with an unexpected twist: a cast of cats. Star Trek Cats is a new take on the iconic characters and scenes, from Kirk in the Captain’s chair to Spock offering his Vulcan wisdom.

The cat-filled scenes leave us with just one question: who wore it better? Set phasers to stun-ning.


Captain James T. Kirk OR this Orange Tabby?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Captain’s Log. Our position, orbiting Psi 2000.”


Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott OR this Scottish Fold?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek


Science Officer and First Officer Spock OR this Oriental Shorthair?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Live long and prosper.”


Lt. Commander Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy OR this Gray-and-White Longhair?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“I’m not a magician, Spock, just an old country doctor.”


Lieutenant Nyota Uhura OR this Burmese?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Incoming communication, Captain.”


Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu OR this Japanese Bobtail?

Star Trek, The Original Series

Star Trek

“Fear not, fair lady!”


– – –

Feline or not, we can all agree that Star Trek has never looked so good. You can find Star Trek Cats at www.Chroniclebooks.com, and get 25% off, plus free shipping, with the code ENERGIZE.

 

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who-wore-it-better-trek-cats-edition Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:49:20 -0700
<![CDATA[Celebrating Shatner's 86th Birthday with Kirk's Best Moments]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/celebrating-shatners-86th-birthday-with-kirks-best-moments

William Shatner -- the man, the legend, Star Trek's original Captain James T. Kirk -- turns 86 years young today. And there's just no stopping him. He's got a new book on the way (Spirit of the Horse: A Celebration of Fact and Fable), a full slate of convention appearances locked in, and he just signed on to star in the romantic comedy film Senior Moment, in which he'll portray a retired Top Gun Navy pilot who tested aircraft for NASA back in the day.

To celebrate, Shatner's big day, we at StarTrek.com asked fans to answer the question, "What were some of Captain Kirk's best moments?" Here are some of the top comments/replies:


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

When Kirk opens the storage compartments and was covered in Tribbles. "As Captain, I want two things done. First, find Cyrano Jones, and second... close that door." Classic!! ("The Trouble with Tribbles")


Star Trek, The Original Series, Willliam Shatner

When he dueled with a Q and won! And, no, I don't care that the Q-Squared book isn't part of canon! As far as I'm concerned, Trelane is a Q!


Star Trek, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, William Shatner

When he asked the Almighty for his I.D. "Excuse me, what does God need with a Starship?" (Star Trek V: The Final Frontier)


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

"They used to say if man could fly, he'd have wings, but he did fly. He discovered he had to. Do you wish that the first Apollo mission hadn't reached the moon, or that we hadn't gone on to Mars and then to the nearest star? That's like saying you wish that you still operate with scalpels and sewed your patients up with catgut like your great-great-great-great grandfather used to. I'm in command. I could order this, but I'm not because Doctor McCoy is right in pointing out the enormous danger potential in any contact with life and intelligence as fantastically advanced as this, but I must point out that the possibilities - the potential for knowledge and advancement - is equally great. Risk! Risk is our business. That's what this starship is all about. That's why we're aboard her." ("Return to Tomorrow")


Star Trek, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, William Shatner

"Of my friend I can only say this: Of all the souls I have encountered, his was the most... human." (Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

Waiting to be beamed over to the Enterprise before being engulfed by the planet killer: "Gentlemen, I suggest you beam me aboard!" ("The Doomsday Machine")


So, what was YOUR favorite Kirk moment, as brought to life by Shatner? While you contemplate that, please join StarTrek.com on offering our best birthday wishes to Shatner. 

 

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William Shatner -- the man, the legend, Star Trek's original Captain James T. Kirk -- turns 86 years young today. And there's just no stopping him. He's got a new book on the way (Spirit of the Horse: A Celebration of Fact and Fable), a full slate of convention appearances locked in, and he just signed on to star in the romantic comedy film Senior Moment, in which he'll portray a retired Top Gun Navy pilot who tested aircraft for NASA back in the day.

To celebrate, Shatner's big day, we at StarTrek.com asked fans to answer the question, "What were some of Captain Kirk's best moments?" Here are some of the top comments/replies:


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

When Kirk opens the storage compartments and was covered in Tribbles. "As Captain, I want two things done. First, find Cyrano Jones, and second... close that door." Classic!! ("The Trouble with Tribbles")


Star Trek, The Original Series, Willliam Shatner

When he dueled with a Q and won! And, no, I don't care that the Q-Squared book isn't part of canon! As far as I'm concerned, Trelane is a Q!


Star Trek, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, William Shatner

When he asked the Almighty for his I.D. "Excuse me, what does God need with a Starship?" (Star Trek V: The Final Frontier)


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

"They used to say if man could fly, he'd have wings, but he did fly. He discovered he had to. Do you wish that the first Apollo mission hadn't reached the moon, or that we hadn't gone on to Mars and then to the nearest star? That's like saying you wish that you still operate with scalpels and sewed your patients up with catgut like your great-great-great-great grandfather used to. I'm in command. I could order this, but I'm not because Doctor McCoy is right in pointing out the enormous danger potential in any contact with life and intelligence as fantastically advanced as this, but I must point out that the possibilities - the potential for knowledge and advancement - is equally great. Risk! Risk is our business. That's what this starship is all about. That's why we're aboard her." ("Return to Tomorrow")


Star Trek, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, William Shatner

"Of my friend I can only say this: Of all the souls I have encountered, his was the most... human." (Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan


Star Trek, The Original Series, William Shatner

Waiting to be beamed over to the Enterprise before being engulfed by the planet killer: "Gentlemen, I suggest you beam me aboard!" ("The Doomsday Machine")


So, what was YOUR favorite Kirk moment, as brought to life by Shatner? While you contemplate that, please join StarTrek.com on offering our best birthday wishes to Shatner. 

 

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celebrating-shatners-86th-birthday-with-kirks-best-moments Tue, 21 Mar 2017 23:30:08 -0700
<![CDATA[Hearts and Minds -- A First Look at the Cover]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/hearts-and-minds-a-first-look-at-the-cover

Star Trek: The Next Generation -- Hearts And Minds, written by popular Trek novelist and StarTrek.com guest blogger Dayton Ward, will be released in May by Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books. StarTrek.com has details and an exclusive First Look at the cover of the upcoming TNG adventure.

Here's the official synospsis:

2031: United States Air Force fighter jets shoot down an unidentified spacecraft and take its crew into custody. Soon, it’s learned that the ship is one of several dispatched across space by an alien species, the Eizand, to search for a new home before their own world becomes uninhabitable. Fearing extraterrestrial invasion, government and military agencies which for more than eighty years have operated in secret swing into action, charged with protecting humanity no matter the cost...

2386: Continuing their exploration of the Odyssean Pass, Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise discover what they at first believe is a previously uncharted world, with a civilization still recovering from the effects of global nuclear war. An astonishing priority message from Starfleet Command warns that there’s more to this planet than meets the eye, and Picard soon realizes that the mysteries of this world may well weave through centuries of undisclosed human history...

Due out on May 30, Star Trek: The Next Generation -- Hearts And Minds will run 400 pages, be available as a mass market paperback, eBook and eAudio, and cost $7.99 in the U.S. and $10.99 in Canada. Go to www.simonandschuster.com to pre-order it.

 

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Star Trek: The Next Generation -- Hearts And Minds, written by popular Trek novelist and StarTrek.com guest blogger Dayton Ward, will be released in May by Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books. StarTrek.com has details and an exclusive First Look at the cover of the upcoming TNG adventure.

Here's the official synospsis:

2031: United States Air Force fighter jets shoot down an unidentified spacecraft and take its crew into custody. Soon, it’s learned that the ship is one of several dispatched across space by an alien species, the Eizand, to search for a new home before their own world becomes uninhabitable. Fearing extraterrestrial invasion, government and military agencies which for more than eighty years have operated in secret swing into action, charged with protecting humanity no matter the cost...

2386: Continuing their exploration of the Odyssean Pass, Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise discover what they at first believe is a previously uncharted world, with a civilization still recovering from the effects of global nuclear war. An astonishing priority message from Starfleet Command warns that there’s more to this planet than meets the eye, and Picard soon realizes that the mysteries of this world may well weave through centuries of undisclosed human history...

Due out on May 30, Star Trek: The Next Generation -- Hearts And Minds will run 400 pages, be available as a mass market paperback, eBook and eAudio, and cost $7.99 in the U.S. and $10.99 in Canada. Go to www.simonandschuster.com to pre-order it.

 

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hearts-and-minds-a-first-look-at-the-cover Mon, 20 Mar 2017 08:29:37 -0700
<![CDATA[Celebrating John de Lancie's Birthday... with Q's Best Moments]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/celebrating-john-de-lancies-birthday-with-qs-best-moments

Happy birthday, John de Lancie. Knowing that the actor's big day was coming up, we at StarTrek.com asked fans the following question on our Facebook page: “What were some of Q's best moments?” Here are were some of the top comments:


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Q Who, John de Lancie

"If you can't take a little bloody nose, maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross. But it's not for the timid."
(from "Q Who")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Q: "I have no powers! Q the ordinary."
Capt. Picard: "Q the liar! Q the misanthrope!"
Q: "Q the miserable, Q the desperate! What must I do to convince you people?
Lt. Worf: "Die."
Q: "Oh, very clever, Worf. Eat any good books lately?"
(from "Deja Q")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Some have mentioned the time (in "Deja Q") when he lost his powers and got them back after he had learned his lesson. Of course, he allowed Data to experience laughter. A subtle point in that episode is that showing kindess and consideration, even to those who don't deserve it, can have a deep impact.


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Q's love for Mariachi music!!
(Also... "Deja Q")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

I love Q and his warped sense of humour. His conversations with Picard and their philosophical exchanges are beautifully written and performed. Of course, the best episode is "Deja Q." One of his most funniest lines, and there are so many of them, is when he tells Worf, " I can't disappear anymore than you can win a beauty contest."


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Tapestry, John de Lancie

When (in "Tapestry") he showed Picard how his life would look like, if he was less lightheaded. Especially the scene when he brings flowers. "Is there a John-Luck Pickerd?!" always gets me.


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Tapestry, John de Lancie

When Picard dies on the bridge and Q shows up pretending to be God.
Picard: "You are not God!"
Q: "Blasphemy! You're lucky I don't cast you out or smite you... or something."
("Tapestry")


Star Trek, Voyager, The Q and the Grey , John de Lancie

When the female Q says (to Q and Janeway), "What are you doing with that dog?... I'm not talking about the puppy." Priceless reaction.
("The Q and the Grey")


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Q-Less , John de Lancie

Getting punched in the face by Sisko. It was about time!
("Q-Less")

Please join StarTrek.com in wishing John de Lancie a happy birthday.

 

]]>

Happy birthday, John de Lancie. Knowing that the actor's big day was coming up, we at StarTrek.com asked fans the following question on our Facebook page: “What were some of Q's best moments?” Here are were some of the top comments:


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Q Who, John de Lancie

"If you can't take a little bloody nose, maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross. But it's not for the timid."
(from "Q Who")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Q: "I have no powers! Q the ordinary."
Capt. Picard: "Q the liar! Q the misanthrope!"
Q: "Q the miserable, Q the desperate! What must I do to convince you people?
Lt. Worf: "Die."
Q: "Oh, very clever, Worf. Eat any good books lately?"
(from "Deja Q")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Some have mentioned the time (in "Deja Q") when he lost his powers and got them back after he had learned his lesson. Of course, he allowed Data to experience laughter. A subtle point in that episode is that showing kindess and consideration, even to those who don't deserve it, can have a deep impact.


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

Q's love for Mariachi music!!
(Also... "Deja Q")


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Deja Q, John de Lancie

I love Q and his warped sense of humour. His conversations with Picard and their philosophical exchanges are beautifully written and performed. Of course, the best episode is "Deja Q." One of his most funniest lines, and there are so many of them, is when he tells Worf, " I can't disappear anymore than you can win a beauty contest."


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Tapestry, John de Lancie

When (in "Tapestry") he showed Picard how his life would look like, if he was less lightheaded. Especially the scene when he brings flowers. "Is there a John-Luck Pickerd?!" always gets me.


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Tapestry, John de Lancie

When Picard dies on the bridge and Q shows up pretending to be God.
Picard: "You are not God!"
Q: "Blasphemy! You're lucky I don't cast you out or smite you... or something."
("Tapestry")


Star Trek, Voyager, The Q and the Grey , John de Lancie

When the female Q says (to Q and Janeway), "What are you doing with that dog?... I'm not talking about the puppy." Priceless reaction.
("The Q and the Grey")


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Q-Less , John de Lancie

Getting punched in the face by Sisko. It was about time!
("Q-Less")

Please join StarTrek.com in wishing John de Lancie a happy birthday.

 

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celebrating-john-de-lancies-birthday-with-qs-best-moments Mon, 20 Mar 2017 06:34:38 -0700
<![CDATA[Linda Park Talks Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Bosch & More ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/linda-park-talks-cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof-bosch-more

Linda Park is so excited that she can barely contain her enthusiasm. The actress, who played Hoshi Sato on Star Trek: Enterprise, will help christen the Antaeus Theatre Company’s brand-new arts space in Glendale, California, officially called the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center, by starring as Maggie the Cat in a production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, which began previews on March 16 and will open on March 23. She will not only portray Maggie opposite her real-life husband, Daniel Bess, but in the process, she’ll become the first Asian-American actress to tackle the part. Also on tap for Park: she’ll appear in several episodes of the acclaimed television series Bosch; season three drops on April 21. And she’s confirmed to appear at the Star Trek Las Vegas mega-convention in August. StarTrek.com chatted with Park about all of the above, and here’s what she had to say:

Star Trek

Let's start with Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. What does it mean to you to launch the new Antaeus stage space?

Oh, my gosh. We got in there later than expected, just last week. We spent most of our time in another rehearsal space. Some of the older Antaean members were so emotional because they've been with the company for over 20 years, since the late '80s. For them to see this actual structure as a home happen is a dream come true. It's like giving birth to a child. It really is. And I've only been with the company, I think, since around 2011. Even for me, it's very emotional to see this community, which I call my family in Los Angeles, to see us, through the work that we create, by the community we've built, by the passion we’ve had and invoked in other people to support us financially, to see that we've given birth to this performing arts center, is great.

And it is a center. It's got a classroom. It's got a black box. It's got a full library. We have a kitchen, a green room. There's a PA system. We're all very excited about this very futuristic, filtered water thing in the wall. You just put your bottle of water underneath and the sensor goes off and it fills it up. For a long time, and it's always been, "When is the last time someone has changed this Brita filter? Do I need to go to Ralph's and buy it myself? I don't care." Now it's like we have top of the line everything. We've had big theater people like Michael Ritchie come in and just be gobsmacked by the professional-ness of our performing arts center. And I love the feeling of the theater space itself. It reminds me of a lot of these great theaters in London, where I spent a good deal of time, at the Almeida and Young Vic, these places that were kind of off-Broadway places that were almost more legit than the West End. That's where the real stuff starts and it has just this high caliber of people. These places are intimate, but professional spaces, and that's the kind of space that we've built.

And you’re playing Maggie. What do you personally find interesting about her?

I have been dreaming of playing Maggie since I was 15 years old. I watched a movie called Double Happiness, with Sandra Oh. She plays this Asian-American actress whose parents tell her that she can't really be an actress because no one will want to put an Asian in movies. Of course, I can relate. In these theatrical scenes in the movie, she’d be in her bedroom and would say Maggie the Cat’s speeches from Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Her bedroom would turn into a theater and stage lights would come on. I didn't even know the play then; I was just amazed by the movie that had a Korean-American actress. I thought, "Oh my God, look there's an example besides Joan Chen, of an Asian-American actress being in the movies." It was an indie, but still. It was a huge deal to me and the speeches she made as Maggie really touched me.

That made me go out and find the play and read it. The first time I read it, I was 15, and I think I just cried for a good hour. It tapped into something so deeply that I felt about the pain of what it is to not be able to communicate with things you love. The way that love, even though best intentioned, can be very hurtful. My experiences up until then were very painful experiences, not romantically, but in other ways they were. I had a lot of experiences of not... unconditional, simple love. I had very complicated paradigms.

When I read Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, I recognized what Tennessee Williams was trying to say, and it was a catharsis for me, as a troubled teen. I auditioned for all of my drama school auditions with Maggie the Cat. I got into most of the schools I auditioned for and I think largely because I had such a connection to that piece of work. I never thought I would be able to play her because it's made in the south and it's in the 1950's. I felt that the world barred me from his work because I was Asian.

Star Trek

Which brings us to this point: You were born in Korea. On the one hand, it's big news that you're playing Maggie, but on the other hand, it shouldn't matter at all. What are your thoughts? Can your casting as Maggie be both celebrated and downplayed at the same time?

Here's what I think ... That's a complicated question, as right now race is a very complicated question in our current climate. Which is good. I think that glass needs to be shaken up because people got very complacent in saying that we're in a post-racial world. In the past couple of years, even before Trump, it's become very clear that we are not living in a post-racial world. Things may be a lot subtler or a lot under the radar, but these issues have not been taken care of. They've just been brushed under the carpet in some ways. First of all, I think that it is a very important thing... I don't like to say just the first Korean Maggie. I like to say the first Asian Maggie because there is such a juxtaposition in people's mind of the south… Gone with the Wind. The Help. You know, the deep south and during that time of Jim Crow segregation or the Civil War. People just think of them as completely juxtaposed, like those things can't live together.

I think to answer your question… yes. This is very important and, thankfully, LA Weekly is doing a whole piece about it, about me being the first Asian Maggie. I don't know that it can be downplayed, but I think what's interesting about how I'm approaching it, is leading up to auditions, Cameron and I, the director, had spoken a lot and he seemed totally open to an Asian Maggie. There's also… it has to work with our world, it has to be justified. I agree 100%. It's not like Shakespeare, where there's more fluidity of racial casting. It's very specific because of what's going on at that time with Jim Crow segregation, with the abolition of slavery, with the dynamics of black versus white.

Sounds like you did a great deal of research…

I did. I started doing a lot of research and this is where I'm so excited. I found out about this whole community of the Chinese in the Delta. They set up communities there and by the time the 1950's came, these Chinese, they were known as the third race of Mississippi. A lot of races went against them until they slowly worked their way into the community, just the way the Jews, or the Irish, or the Polish, and the Italians did, where they were an accepted part of society. They ran a lot of grocery stores. Many were spoken well of.

I have this picture of a Chinese little girl and it's her first day at Oak First Elementary in 1950. It’s an all-white elementary school in Clydesdale, Mississippi. Her parents were in court two years trying to get her into the white school. There were black schools and there were white schools -- and Chinese didn't want to send themselves, the children, to black schools, not the-well-to-do Chinese.

There's this whole part of the deep south that is not portrayed in these movies. You get the black and the whites, like Loving, or The Help or Mississippi Burning. What is not portrayed, that is an actual part of history, was this whole Chinese community that existed, not only in the Mississippi Delta, but in pockets all through the south. One of the books I'm reading is called Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton. and the other is Asian-Americans in Dixie. It's absolutely fascinating. When we tell these stories about history, this is a chance for me as an Asian-American woman to tell this version of history that has not been seen yet.

Star Trek

And you’ve applied that to Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Yes. The way I see it is, within Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, that Maggie has a Chinese mother and my white father who came from a well-to-do family; black sheep, alcoholic, completely turned away from the family. By high school, both parents were dead. I went to live with my rich, old aunt because they were going to ... This is all stuff that Maggie says, but that's what validates how Maggie can say she's from society. That she's always been poor. Has never had money. Has always been an outsider. Has always been looked down on. The golden spoon was just out of her reach. All she has is... The only thing she has to stand on is a shred of some kind of belonging by who her father was. Money, that's her biggest hunger. It’s what drives her. She says, "I've been so disgustingly poor all my life." She constantly... To me at least, what makes me connect with Maggie on such a deep level is having to find, “Here is my place in this world where I belong.” On just a primordial level, it’s “I have a right to exist. I have a right to take up air.” As an immigrant, I feel that so, so, so ferociously, a very basic level of constantly needing to prove that I belong here. That's my Maggie.

Right in the middle of your run in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof you’ll be back on TV in Bosch. How was that experience?

That was great. The scripts felt very cinematic. The TV I’d done before, it was mostly network TV. Bosch is on Amazon, and it kind of felt like doing an independent film. That’s how I’d describe it. I’m not sure how much I can tell you about my role. I don’t think they want a lot out there yet. But I’m in five episodes, I think it is, and it’s a very emotional role because of what she does. She’s very different from anyone I’ve ever played, and that was fun to do. What’s interesting is I met Titus (Welliver), who was on Star Trek (Voyager), but I never got to work with him on Bosch. Our characters don’t have any scenes together.    

Star Trek

Let's talk Star Trek for a few minutes. How hard is it to believe that it's already 12 years since Enterprise ended?

I guess it’s really not too hard for me to believe, actually. So much has happened in my life. I've gone on to do many shows after that and I've gone on to get married. I've lived in different cities. This is really OK to me. It just seems like it’s all gone the way it was supposed to go.

Star Trek

Not too long ago, the entire Enterprise cast did a sit-down conversation with Brannon Braga for the Enterprise Blu-ray extras. What was that like for you, to have everyone in one place again and revisit what worked and what didn't work with the show?

It was refreshing. We could talk about the show in the past tense and be candid about everything. We could be honest about asking Brannon questions and he was honest in his replies, too. It was great to see everyone again… Scott and John and Connor and Dom and Anthony and Jolene. Our lives have taken us in different directions. So it was great to be able to catch up on camera, and when we weren’t on camera. I see some of the guys at conventions once in a while, and sometimes we’ll be on panels together, a couple of us. But I hadn’t seen Jolene in a long time. And I think that was the first time we were all together since the show had ended. We’re all older now. Some of us have gotten married or had kids or moved. But it was nice to catch up, because Enterprise was four years together and a really big chapter in all of our lives.

Star Trek

As you mentioned, you still do make the occasional convention appearance. You’ll be at Star Trek Las Vegas this summer, for example. Are you finding that more people are discovering and/or enjoying Enterprise?

Yes. I think with the Enterprise Blu-rays and Netlix that a lot of people either discovered us or rediscovered us. And I’m seeing and hearing that a lot at the conventions. There’s a whole new generation of Star Trek fans out there. I've been meeting so many young children who’ve had Enterprise introduced to them by their parents. So, that's been really exciting for me, to have young audiences get excited about the show and the work we did. We came on very late in that whole Star Trek run. We didn’t really get the promotion we should have. We never had a lot of eyes on us when we were on the air, so it’s nice to know that people are finding Enterprise now, all this time later. And there are people re-discovering it, too. Some of the fans maybe didn't give us a chance when we were on and they’ve gone back and realized it was really pretty good. So, the show will always reach somebody.


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof will run from March 23 until May 7 at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale, California, with two rotating casts. Go to http://antaeus.org/shows/cat/ for additional details and to purchase tickets.

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Linda Park is so excited that she can barely contain her enthusiasm. The actress, who played Hoshi Sato on Star Trek: Enterprise, will help christen the Antaeus Theatre Company’s brand-new arts space in Glendale, California, officially called the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center, by starring as Maggie the Cat in a production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, which began previews on March 16 and will open on March 23. She will not only portray Maggie opposite her real-life husband, Daniel Bess, but in the process, she’ll become the first Asian-American actress to tackle the part. Also on tap for Park: she’ll appear in several episodes of the acclaimed television series Bosch; season three drops on April 21. And she’s confirmed to appear at the Star Trek Las Vegas mega-convention in August. StarTrek.com chatted with Park about all of the above, and here’s what she had to say:

Star Trek

Let's start with Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. What does it mean to you to launch the new Antaeus stage space?

Oh, my gosh. We got in there later than expected, just last week. We spent most of our time in another rehearsal space. Some of the older Antaean members were so emotional because they've been with the company for over 20 years, since the late '80s. For them to see this actual structure as a home happen is a dream come true. It's like giving birth to a child. It really is. And I've only been with the company, I think, since around 2011. Even for me, it's very emotional to see this community, which I call my family in Los Angeles, to see us, through the work that we create, by the community we've built, by the passion we’ve had and invoked in other people to support us financially, to see that we've given birth to this performing arts center, is great.

And it is a center. It's got a classroom. It's got a black box. It's got a full library. We have a kitchen, a green room. There's a PA system. We're all very excited about this very futuristic, filtered water thing in the wall. You just put your bottle of water underneath and the sensor goes off and it fills it up. For a long time, and it's always been, "When is the last time someone has changed this Brita filter? Do I need to go to Ralph's and buy it myself? I don't care." Now it's like we have top of the line everything. We've had big theater people like Michael Ritchie come in and just be gobsmacked by the professional-ness of our performing arts center. And I love the feeling of the theater space itself. It reminds me of a lot of these great theaters in London, where I spent a good deal of time, at the Almeida and Young Vic, these places that were kind of off-Broadway places that were almost more legit than the West End. That's where the real stuff starts and it has just this high caliber of people. These places are intimate, but professional spaces, and that's the kind of space that we've built.

And you’re playing Maggie. What do you personally find interesting about her?

I have been dreaming of playing Maggie since I was 15 years old. I watched a movie called Double Happiness, with Sandra Oh. She plays this Asian-American actress whose parents tell her that she can't really be an actress because no one will want to put an Asian in movies. Of course, I can relate. In these theatrical scenes in the movie, she’d be in her bedroom and would say Maggie the Cat’s speeches from Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Her bedroom would turn into a theater and stage lights would come on. I didn't even know the play then; I was just amazed by the movie that had a Korean-American actress. I thought, "Oh my God, look there's an example besides Joan Chen, of an Asian-American actress being in the movies." It was an indie, but still. It was a huge deal to me and the speeches she made as Maggie really touched me.

That made me go out and find the play and read it. The first time I read it, I was 15, and I think I just cried for a good hour. It tapped into something so deeply that I felt about the pain of what it is to not be able to communicate with things you love. The way that love, even though best intentioned, can be very hurtful. My experiences up until then were very painful experiences, not romantically, but in other ways they were. I had a lot of experiences of not... unconditional, simple love. I had very complicated paradigms.

When I read Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, I recognized what Tennessee Williams was trying to say, and it was a catharsis for me, as a troubled teen. I auditioned for all of my drama school auditions with Maggie the Cat. I got into most of the schools I auditioned for and I think largely because I had such a connection to that piece of work. I never thought I would be able to play her because it's made in the south and it's in the 1950's. I felt that the world barred me from his work because I was Asian.

Star Trek

Which brings us to this point: You were born in Korea. On the one hand, it's big news that you're playing Maggie, but on the other hand, it shouldn't matter at all. What are your thoughts? Can your casting as Maggie be both celebrated and downplayed at the same time?

Here's what I think ... That's a complicated question, as right now race is a very complicated question in our current climate. Which is good. I think that glass needs to be shaken up because people got very complacent in saying that we're in a post-racial world. In the past couple of years, even before Trump, it's become very clear that we are not living in a post-racial world. Things may be a lot subtler or a lot under the radar, but these issues have not been taken care of. They've just been brushed under the carpet in some ways. First of all, I think that it is a very important thing... I don't like to say just the first Korean Maggie. I like to say the first Asian Maggie because there is such a juxtaposition in people's mind of the south… Gone with the Wind. The Help. You know, the deep south and during that time of Jim Crow segregation or the Civil War. People just think of them as completely juxtaposed, like those things can't live together.

I think to answer your question… yes. This is very important and, thankfully, LA Weekly is doing a whole piece about it, about me being the first Asian Maggie. I don't know that it can be downplayed, but I think what's interesting about how I'm approaching it, is leading up to auditions, Cameron and I, the director, had spoken a lot and he seemed totally open to an Asian Maggie. There's also… it has to work with our world, it has to be justified. I agree 100%. It's not like Shakespeare, where there's more fluidity of racial casting. It's very specific because of what's going on at that time with Jim Crow segregation, with the abolition of slavery, with the dynamics of black versus white.

Sounds like you did a great deal of research…

I did. I started doing a lot of research and this is where I'm so excited. I found out about this whole community of the Chinese in the Delta. They set up communities there and by the time the 1950's came, these Chinese, they were known as the third race of Mississippi. A lot of races went against them until they slowly worked their way into the community, just the way the Jews, or the Irish, or the Polish, and the Italians did, where they were an accepted part of society. They ran a lot of grocery stores. Many were spoken well of.

I have this picture of a Chinese little girl and it's her first day at Oak First Elementary in 1950. It’s an all-white elementary school in Clydesdale, Mississippi. Her parents were in court two years trying to get her into the white school. There were black schools and there were white schools -- and Chinese didn't want to send themselves, the children, to black schools, not the-well-to-do Chinese.

There's this whole part of the deep south that is not portrayed in these movies. You get the black and the whites, like Loving, or The Help or Mississippi Burning. What is not portrayed, that is an actual part of history, was this whole Chinese community that existed, not only in the Mississippi Delta, but in pockets all through the south. One of the books I'm reading is called Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton. and the other is Asian-Americans in Dixie. It's absolutely fascinating. When we tell these stories about history, this is a chance for me as an Asian-American woman to tell this version of history that has not been seen yet.

Star Trek

And you’ve applied that to Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Yes. The way I see it is, within Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, that Maggie has a Chinese mother and my white father who came from a well-to-do family; black sheep, alcoholic, completely turned away from the family. By high school, both parents were dead. I went to live with my rich, old aunt because they were going to ... This is all stuff that Maggie says, but that's what validates how Maggie can say she's from society. That she's always been poor. Has never had money. Has always been an outsider. Has always been looked down on. The golden spoon was just out of her reach. All she has is... The only thing she has to stand on is a shred of some kind of belonging by who her father was. Money, that's her biggest hunger. It’s what drives her. She says, "I've been so disgustingly poor all my life." She constantly... To me at least, what makes me connect with Maggie on such a deep level is having to find, “Here is my place in this world where I belong.” On just a primordial level, it’s “I have a right to exist. I have a right to take up air.” As an immigrant, I feel that so, so, so ferociously, a very basic level of constantly needing to prove that I belong here. That's my Maggie.

Right in the middle of your run in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof you’ll be back on TV in Bosch. How was that experience?

That was great. The scripts felt very cinematic. The TV I’d done before, it was mostly network TV. Bosch is on Amazon, and it kind of felt like doing an independent film. That’s how I’d describe it. I’m not sure how much I can tell you about my role. I don’t think they want a lot out there yet. But I’m in five episodes, I think it is, and it’s a very emotional role because of what she does. She’s very different from anyone I’ve ever played, and that was fun to do. What’s interesting is I met Titus (Welliver), who was on Star Trek (Voyager), but I never got to work with him on Bosch. Our characters don’t have any scenes together.    

Star Trek

Let's talk Star Trek for a few minutes. How hard is it to believe that it's already 12 years since Enterprise ended?

I guess it’s really not too hard for me to believe, actually. So much has happened in my life. I've gone on to do many shows after that and I've gone on to get married. I've lived in different cities. This is really OK to me. It just seems like it’s all gone the way it was supposed to go.

Star Trek

Not too long ago, the entire Enterprise cast did a sit-down conversation with Brannon Braga for the Enterprise Blu-ray extras. What was that like for you, to have everyone in one place again and revisit what worked and what didn't work with the show?

It was refreshing. We could talk about the show in the past tense and be candid about everything. We could be honest about asking Brannon questions and he was honest in his replies, too. It was great to see everyone again… Scott and John and Connor and Dom and Anthony and Jolene. Our lives have taken us in different directions. So it was great to be able to catch up on camera, and when we weren’t on camera. I see some of the guys at conventions once in a while, and sometimes we’ll be on panels together, a couple of us. But I hadn’t seen Jolene in a long time. And I think that was the first time we were all together since the show had ended. We’re all older now. Some of us have gotten married or had kids or moved. But it was nice to catch up, because Enterprise was four years together and a really big chapter in all of our lives.

Star Trek

As you mentioned, you still do make the occasional convention appearance. You’ll be at Star Trek Las Vegas this summer, for example. Are you finding that more people are discovering and/or enjoying Enterprise?

Yes. I think with the Enterprise Blu-rays and Netlix that a lot of people either discovered us or rediscovered us. And I’m seeing and hearing that a lot at the conventions. There’s a whole new generation of Star Trek fans out there. I've been meeting so many young children who’ve had Enterprise introduced to them by their parents. So, that's been really exciting for me, to have young audiences get excited about the show and the work we did. We came on very late in that whole Star Trek run. We didn’t really get the promotion we should have. We never had a lot of eyes on us when we were on the air, so it’s nice to know that people are finding Enterprise now, all this time later. And there are people re-discovering it, too. Some of the fans maybe didn't give us a chance when we were on and they’ve gone back and realized it was really pretty good. So, the show will always reach somebody.


Cat on a Hot Tin Roof will run from March 23 until May 7 at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale, California, with two rotating casts. Go to http://antaeus.org/shows/cat/ for additional details and to purchase tickets.

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linda-park-talks-cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof-bosch-more Sun, 19 Mar 2017 11:47:05 -0700
<![CDATA[Best-Ever Trek Episode Round-Two Winners Are... ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/best-ever-trek-episode-round-two-winners-are

StarTrek.com's mission to determine Star Trek's best-ever episode is now on to round two (of four). Fans could choose from "Bound," "The Enterprise Incident," "In the Pale Moonlight," "Journey to Babel," "The Magnificent Ferengi," "Similitude," "Sins of the Father," "A Taste of Armageddon," "The Trouble With Tribbles" and "The Visitor." Thousands of fans voted, and here are the results:


Star Trek, The Original Series, The Trouble with Tribbles

"The Trouble with Tribbles" (34%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, In the Pale Moonlight

"In the Pale Moonlight" (26%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, The Visitor

"The Visitor" (9%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Sins of the Father

"Sins of the Father" (8%)


Star Trek, The Original Series, The Enterprise Incident

"The Enterprise Incident" (7%, 329 votes)


Star Trek, The Original Series, Journey to Babel

"Journey to Babel" (7%, 311 votes)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, The Magnificent Ferengi

"The Magnificent Ferengi" (4%)


Star Trek, The Original Series, A Taste of Armageddon

"A Taste of Armageddon" (3%)


Star Trek, Enterprise, Similitude

"Similitude" (2%)


Star Trek, Enterprise, Bound

"Bound" (1%)

As previously reported, we started with 40 episodes from across the franchise, with the episodes having been "seeded" based on previous "Best Of" polls we've conducted over the past few years. We're holding four (4) preliminary rounds of 10 episodes each. Based upon votes from you, our readers, the top two episodes in each round will move on to the finals, with the two remaining episodes that elicit the most votes serving as wild card entries in the finals. Let's find out what the options for Round 3 are!

 

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StarTrek.com's mission to determine Star Trek's best-ever episode is now on to round two (of four). Fans could choose from "Bound," "The Enterprise Incident," "In the Pale Moonlight," "Journey to Babel," "The Magnificent Ferengi," "Similitude," "Sins of the Father," "A Taste of Armageddon," "The Trouble With Tribbles" and "The Visitor." Thousands of fans voted, and here are the results:


Star Trek, The Original Series, The Trouble with Tribbles

"The Trouble with Tribbles" (34%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, In the Pale Moonlight

"In the Pale Moonlight" (26%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, The Visitor

"The Visitor" (9%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation, Sins of the Father

"Sins of the Father" (8%)


Star Trek, The Original Series, The Enterprise Incident

"The Enterprise Incident" (7%, 329 votes)


Star Trek, The Original Series, Journey to Babel

"Journey to Babel" (7%, 311 votes)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, The Magnificent Ferengi

"The Magnificent Ferengi" (4%)


Star Trek, The Original Series, A Taste of Armageddon

"A Taste of Armageddon" (3%)


Star Trek, Enterprise, Similitude

"Similitude" (2%)


Star Trek, Enterprise, Bound

"Bound" (1%)

As previously reported, we started with 40 episodes from across the franchise, with the episodes having been "seeded" based on previous "Best Of" polls we've conducted over the past few years. We're holding four (4) preliminary rounds of 10 episodes each. Based upon votes from you, our readers, the top two episodes in each round will move on to the finals, with the two remaining episodes that elicit the most votes serving as wild card entries in the finals. Let's find out what the options for Round 3 are!

 

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best-ever-trek-episode-round-two-winners-are Sun, 19 Mar 2017 07:55:45 -0700
<![CDATA[Trek's Most Awkward Moments Are...]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/treks-most-awkward-moments-are

We can't -- and don't -- make this stuff up, but today is apparently National Awkward Moments Day. Yup, it's a thing. So, in advance of it, we asked StarTrek.com readers to pick what they considered the most awkward moments on Star Trek. Below are some images and gifs of the top replies:


Star Trek

In "Favorite Son," when Harry Kim thought himself as a special alien these women fancied... until he discovered the women only wanted him for his DNA. Awkward!


Star Trek

When Spock thought he had killed Kirk and, when he realized he was alive, shouted "Jim!" with all the excitement -- and a huge smile on his face.


Star Trek

That time when Mr. Barclay was on the Enterprise and Captain Picard tries talking to him on the bridge, mispronouncing his name from Barclay to the slang Mr. Broccoli... very awkward for him, indeed.


Star Trek

I'd have to go with the 30 seconds it took Jadzia to totally "friend zone" Dr Bashir in S01E16 "If Wishes Were Horses.”


Star Trek

The scene in "Plato's Stepchildren" where Spock dances around Kirk's head and Kirk pretends to be a horse for Alexander. 


Star Trek

Voyager... when an evolved Tom Paris took Janeway on a transwarp trip to kickstart her evolution process, so they could reproduce on a foreign planet.


Star Trek

Picard waking up in bed next to Q ("Tapestry")

 

]]>

We can't -- and don't -- make this stuff up, but today is apparently National Awkward Moments Day. Yup, it's a thing. So, in advance of it, we asked StarTrek.com readers to pick what they considered the most awkward moments on Star Trek. Below are some images and gifs of the top replies:


Star Trek

In "Favorite Son," when Harry Kim thought himself as a special alien these women fancied... until he discovered the women only wanted him for his DNA. Awkward!


Star Trek

When Spock thought he had killed Kirk and, when he realized he was alive, shouted "Jim!" with all the excitement -- and a huge smile on his face.


Star Trek

That time when Mr. Barclay was on the Enterprise and Captain Picard tries talking to him on the bridge, mispronouncing his name from Barclay to the slang Mr. Broccoli... very awkward for him, indeed.


Star Trek

I'd have to go with the 30 seconds it took Jadzia to totally "friend zone" Dr Bashir in S01E16 "If Wishes Were Horses.”


Star Trek

The scene in "Plato's Stepchildren" where Spock dances around Kirk's head and Kirk pretends to be a horse for Alexander. 


Star Trek

Voyager... when an evolved Tom Paris took Janeway on a transwarp trip to kickstart her evolution process, so they could reproduce on a foreign planet.


Star Trek

Picard waking up in bed next to Q ("Tapestry")

 

]]>
treks-most-awkward-moments-are Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:14:29 -0700
<![CDATA[Remembering Lawrence Montaigne, 1931-2017]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/remembering-lawrence-montaigne-1931-2017

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Lawrence Montaigne, the veteran actor who played the Romulan, Decius, in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "Balance of Terror" in 1966 and returned a year later to portray Stonn, a Vulcan, in "Amok Time." The actor died on Friday, March 17, at the age of 86.

Star Trek The Original Series Decius Lawrence Montaigne

According to the biography on Montaigne's official site, he was born in Brooklyn, New York, raised in Rome, Italy, and developed an early talent for languages, which opened many doors for him as an actor. Trained as a classical dancer, he appeared on Broadway in Hazel Flagg and Shinbone Alley (with Eartha Kitt). He was eventually lured to Hollywood, where he worked with the Hollywood Bowl Ballet Company. In films, he worked as a dancer with such notables as Gene Kelly, Donald O'Conner and Mitzie Gaynor. He studied fencing both in the U.S. and Europe, which afforded him the opportunity to work as a stuntman on Scaramouche, The Three Musketeers, Julius Caesar and in a series of low-budget, swashbuckling films for Sam Katzman at Columbia.

Lawrence Montaigne in The Great Escape

Upon discharge from the Marine Corp, Montaigne's bio continued, he studied drama at The Dramatic Workshop in New York, and was prepared to make the transition into acting when the opportunity arose. He was featured in such films as The Great Escape (with Steve McQueen and James Garner), Tubruk (with Rock Hudson and George Peppard) and The Power (with George Hamilton and Suzanne Pleshette), and later in Captain Sinbad and Damon & Pythias (both starring Guy Williams), The Mongols (starring Jack Palance and Anita Ekberg) and Escape To Witch Mountain (with Ray Milland and Donald Pleasance.) He starred in Pillar Of Fire (made in Israel), and in Moby Jackson and Rapina Al Quartiere Ovest (both made in Italy.) He worked, over the course of his career, in Italy, Germany, Yugoslavia, Israel, Spain and the U.S.

In addition to his film credits, Montaigne, by his own count, appeared in more than 200 episodes of television, including The Outer Limits, The Fugitive, I Spy, The Time Tunnel, Batman, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Mission: Impossible and Dallas. According to various sources, including Montaigne himself, the producers of TOS were ready to tap him to replace Leonard Nimoy as Spock when negotiations with with Nimoy seemed unlikely to pan out; they did, however, and Montaigne was invited to play Stonn.

Star Trek The Original Series Lawrence Montaigne Stonn

Montaigne, during an extensive interview with StarTrek.com in 2012, said said he and Nimoy never discussed the matter on set or later. "It was history," he explained. "It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way."

It was history. It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way. - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-tos-guest-star-lawrence-montaigne#sthash.hADv6Dr5.dpuf

It was history. It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way. - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-tos-guest-star-lawrence-montaigne#sthash.hADv6Dr5.dpuf

Forty-plus years after his TOS roles, Montaigne reprised Stonn in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men, directed by Tim Russ. In addition to his work as an actor and stuntman, he wrote an autobiography, A Vulcan Odyssey, and two novels, The Guardian List and The Barrel of Death. Further, his bio states, he was employed as a proofreader doing medical translations for Worldwide Translations, and taught drama part-time at UNLV, near where he lived in Henderson, Nevada.

As recently as last August, Montaigne was a regular presence at the annual Star Trek Las Vegas gathering. Back in 2012, in our StarTrek.com interview, the actor explained that even so many years after "Balance of Terror" and "Amok Time," he still enjoyed meeting fans, signing autographs, posing for photos and reminiscing.

Lawrence Montaigne

"I love it," he said. "I’m out of touch. I’m living in Vegas, not in Los Angeles. I’m not in the hub of things. So, when I’m in Vegas, not only do I enjoy seeing the fans, but I have the opportunity to see people I’ve worked with, people I’ve known for years, people I don’t otherwise have an opportunity to see on a social basis because of geography. The fans are so great. Some of the fans come back year in and year out, so we’re on a first-name basis. We’ll talk about the things they’ve done in the past year and, likewise, I’ll talk about what I’ve done. So, it’s a lot of fun. I can’t imagine an actor who’s worked on Star Trek not wanting to get involved and do these conventions."

Please join StarTrek.com in extending our condolences to Montaigne's family, friends, colleagues and fans around the world.

]]>

StarTrek.com is saddened to report the passing of Lawrence Montaigne, the veteran actor who played the Romulan, Decius, in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "Balance of Terror" in 1966 and returned a year later to portray Stonn, a Vulcan, in "Amok Time." The actor died on Friday, March 17, at the age of 86.

Star Trek The Original Series Decius Lawrence Montaigne

According to the biography on Montaigne's official site, he was born in Brooklyn, New York, raised in Rome, Italy, and developed an early talent for languages, which opened many doors for him as an actor. Trained as a classical dancer, he appeared on Broadway in Hazel Flagg and Shinbone Alley (with Eartha Kitt). He was eventually lured to Hollywood, where he worked with the Hollywood Bowl Ballet Company. In films, he worked as a dancer with such notables as Gene Kelly, Donald O'Conner and Mitzie Gaynor. He studied fencing both in the U.S. and Europe, which afforded him the opportunity to work as a stuntman on Scaramouche, The Three Musketeers, Julius Caesar and in a series of low-budget, swashbuckling films for Sam Katzman at Columbia.

Lawrence Montaigne in The Great Escape

Upon discharge from the Marine Corp, Montaigne's bio continued, he studied drama at The Dramatic Workshop in New York, and was prepared to make the transition into acting when the opportunity arose. He was featured in such films as The Great Escape (with Steve McQueen and James Garner), Tubruk (with Rock Hudson and George Peppard) and The Power (with George Hamilton and Suzanne Pleshette), and later in Captain Sinbad and Damon & Pythias (both starring Guy Williams), The Mongols (starring Jack Palance and Anita Ekberg) and Escape To Witch Mountain (with Ray Milland and Donald Pleasance.) He starred in Pillar Of Fire (made in Israel), and in Moby Jackson and Rapina Al Quartiere Ovest (both made in Italy.) He worked, over the course of his career, in Italy, Germany, Yugoslavia, Israel, Spain and the U.S.

In addition to his film credits, Montaigne, by his own count, appeared in more than 200 episodes of television, including The Outer Limits, The Fugitive, I Spy, The Time Tunnel, Batman, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Mission: Impossible and Dallas. According to various sources, including Montaigne himself, the producers of TOS were ready to tap him to replace Leonard Nimoy as Spock when negotiations with with Nimoy seemed unlikely to pan out; they did, however, and Montaigne was invited to play Stonn.

Star Trek The Original Series Lawrence Montaigne Stonn

Montaigne, during an extensive interview with StarTrek.com in 2012, said said he and Nimoy never discussed the matter on set or later. "It was history," he explained. "It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way."

It was history. It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way. - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-tos-guest-star-lawrence-montaigne#sthash.hADv6Dr5.dpuf

It was history. It was over and that’s all there was to it. I moved on. This was the 1960s, and I was doing a whole bunch of shows and films, and having the time of my life. So, when Spock didn’t happen, it really didn’t change my life in any way. - See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-tos-guest-star-lawrence-montaigne#sthash.hADv6Dr5.dpuf

Forty-plus years after his TOS roles, Montaigne reprised Stonn in the fan film Star Trek: Of Gods and Men, directed by Tim Russ. In addition to his work as an actor and stuntman, he wrote an autobiography, A Vulcan Odyssey, and two novels, The Guardian List and The Barrel of Death. Further, his bio states, he was employed as a proofreader doing medical translations for Worldwide Translations, and taught drama part-time at UNLV, near where he lived in Henderson, Nevada.

As recently as last August, Montaigne was a regular presence at the annual Star Trek Las Vegas gathering. Back in 2012, in our StarTrek.com interview, the actor explained that even so many years after "Balance of Terror" and "Amok Time," he still enjoyed meeting fans, signing autographs, posing for photos and reminiscing.

Lawrence Montaigne

"I love it," he said. "I’m out of touch. I’m living in Vegas, not in Los Angeles. I’m not in the hub of things. So, when I’m in Vegas, not only do I enjoy seeing the fans, but I have the opportunity to see people I’ve worked with, people I’ve known for years, people I don’t otherwise have an opportunity to see on a social basis because of geography. The fans are so great. Some of the fans come back year in and year out, so we’re on a first-name basis. We’ll talk about the things they’ve done in the past year and, likewise, I’ll talk about what I’ve done. So, it’s a lot of fun. I can’t imagine an actor who’s worked on Star Trek not wanting to get involved and do these conventions."

Please join StarTrek.com in extending our condolences to Montaigne's family, friends, colleagues and fans around the world.

]]>
remembering-lawrence-montaigne-1931-2017 Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:10:18 -0700
<![CDATA[Nimoy Documentary to Premiere at Newport Beach Film Festival]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/nimoy-documentary-to-premiere-at-newport-beach-film-festival

Remembering Leonard Nimoy, the documentary produced and directed by Nimoy's daughter Julie Nimoy and his son-in-law David Knight, will have its world premiere at the upcoming Newport Beach Film Festival, which will be held April 20-27.

Star Trek

As StarTrek.com readers know, Remembering Leonard Nimoy is an intimate journey into Nimoy’s personal life, featuring stories from his childhood growing up in Boston, his early days in Hollywood, and his break-out role as Spock on Star Trek: The Original Series, as well as highlights from his remarkable career and details about the final years of his life battling Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Further, the documentary features interviews with Nimoy's family, including his children Julie and Adam, wife Susan, step-son Aaron and his six grandchildren, who share poignant stories and anecdotes about Nimoy, the family man. The film also includes never-before-seen videos and photos.

"The Newport Beach Film Festival is extremely proud to host the world premiere of Remembering Leonard Nimoy," Gregg Schwenk, CEO Newport Beach Film Festival, said in a statement. "It is a powerful and intensely personal journey through the life of the legendary actor, director and artist."

Tickets for will go on sale April 1st at newportbeachfilmfest.com.

]]>

Remembering Leonard Nimoy, the documentary produced and directed by Nimoy's daughter Julie Nimoy and his son-in-law David Knight, will have its world premiere at the upcoming Newport Beach Film Festival, which will be held April 20-27.

Star Trek

As StarTrek.com readers know, Remembering Leonard Nimoy is an intimate journey into Nimoy’s personal life, featuring stories from his childhood growing up in Boston, his early days in Hollywood, and his break-out role as Spock on Star Trek: The Original Series, as well as highlights from his remarkable career and details about the final years of his life battling Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Further, the documentary features interviews with Nimoy's family, including his children Julie and Adam, wife Susan, step-son Aaron and his six grandchildren, who share poignant stories and anecdotes about Nimoy, the family man. The film also includes never-before-seen videos and photos.

"The Newport Beach Film Festival is extremely proud to host the world premiere of Remembering Leonard Nimoy," Gregg Schwenk, CEO Newport Beach Film Festival, said in a statement. "It is a powerful and intensely personal journey through the life of the legendary actor, director and artist."

Tickets for will go on sale April 1st at newportbeachfilmfest.com.

]]>
nimoy-documentary-to-premiere-at-newport-beach-film-festival Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:40:51 -0700
<![CDATA[STO's Temporal Agents Now Recruiting]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/stos-temporal-agents-now-recruiting

The fight for the future – and the past – is heating up. Prepare to boldly go when no-one has gone before... with Star Trek Online.

Federation agents from the 31st century are conducting covert operations to find new recruits. They’ve gone back to the 23rd century, in the early days of Starfleet, to find likely candidates.

For a limited time, these captains can become special Temporal Agents, recruited to track down and disable probes seeded throughout the timeline by the Na’kuhl and their allies. 23rd Century Captains created since the launch of Agents of Yesterday on February 14 are already Temporal Agents in this new reward system. All objectives listed below have been kept track of on currently created characters. All 23rd Century captains created before April 4, 2017 will also be able to take part in this system.

Temporal Agents will play through all of the usual story missions, but in many of them they’ll uncover probes left by the Na’kuhl to gather intel or drop off equipment for enemy operatives. By completing puzzles, Temporal Agent captains can unlock those probes and disable them – and get great rewards in the process. In some cases, the interference of the Na’kuhl may result in new enemies or revelation of new secrets in these missions.

In addition to hunting down temporal probes, Temporal Agents will be able to use their special Temporal Transponder item to claim rewards for completing other tasks, such as finishing story arcs, gaining Reputations, completing Duty Officer commendations, finishing Admiralty campaigns and learning Specialization skills. Unlocking these rewards will also earn rewards for other characters on your account, in addition to providing your Temporal Agent with new traits, gear, and bonus marks.

Temporal Agent Rewards

The rewards for playing a new temporal recruit are many – and the tasks are those that many captains will complete as they play through the story arcs. Long-term dedication is also rewarded with new bonuses.

Find Temporal Probes: Finding and disabling Na’kuhl temporal probes in various missions will award your Temporal Agent with a small box of Marks of your choice. Finding half of the temporal probes will additionally award you with the new Trait: Rapid Support, which reduces the cooldown time of your Engineering, Science, and Tactical Fleet Captain ability. Finding all of the probes will unlock an Improved version of the Rapid Support Trait.

Reach Rank of Admiral: At each new rank you’ll gain a package of gear to enhance your space weapons, space equipment, space consoles, or ground equipment – your choice.

Specializations: Earn Specialization Points and spend them on skills in Specialization Trees – complete full trees to earn more credit. You’ll earn experience boosts and special Temporal Agent Tech Upgrades, and upon completion of three full Specialization trees, you’ll earn additional Tech Upgrades and all of your Improved Specialization Traits will be increased to Superior versions – giving you better abilities from Command Frequency (Command spec), Predictive Algorithms (Intel spec), Pedal to the Metal (Pilot spec), and Linear Progression (Temporal Operative spec) for all captains on your account.

Research & Development: Reaching level 1 in any R&D school grants you five R&D Duty Officers as well as a Rare Aegis Duty Officer. Reaching level 5 in any R&D school grants you a one-time boost of any school to level 10.

Play through Story Arcs: You’ll gain packages of Fleet Marks, Dilithium, and Energy Credits for playing through each Story Arc, including everything through the Breen arc, as well as the Delta Quadrant arc, the Future Proof arc, and the new Yesterday’s War arc. Finishing half of the Story Arcs unlocks the new Trait: Critical Systems, which grants a bonus to critical hit and critical severity for a short time after using any Emergency Power ability. Completing all of the Story Arcs grants an Improved version of this Trait for all characters on your account.

Admiralty: As you complete tiers of various Admiralty campaigns you’ll gain bonus one-time ship cards and pass tokens. Reaching level 3 in three Admiralty campaigns will give you a bonus that permanently gives you extra experience earned from completion of Admiralty assignments for all captains on your account.

Reputations: Persevere in gaining Reputations and you’ll gain bonus Energy Credits, Dilithium vouchers for use in Reputation Stores, and bonus Marks so that you can purchase the special gear offered by Reputations. When you reach rank 5 in all nine current reputations – Task Force Omega, Temporal Defense Initiative, Nukara Strikeforce, New Romulus, Dyson Joint Command, 8472 Counter-Command, Delta Alliance, Iconian Resistance, and Terran Task Force – your Reputation projects will be updated so that any project that awards special gear will now replace Mk XII very rare gear with Mk XIII ultra-rare gear instead.

Duty Officer Commendations: Work toward reaching rank 4 commendations in every category of Duty Officer commendations. You’ll receive assortments of Temporal Investigator Duty Officers of increasing rarity, and when you reach rank 4 in six commendation categories you’ll receive a unique Temporal Investigator Duty Officer of Epic quality for all captains on your account.

Fleet: Join a fleet after level 30 and get a package of Fleet Marks and Fleet Dilithium Vouchers.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

]]>

The fight for the future – and the past – is heating up. Prepare to boldly go when no-one has gone before... with Star Trek Online.

Federation agents from the 31st century are conducting covert operations to find new recruits. They’ve gone back to the 23rd century, in the early days of Starfleet, to find likely candidates.

For a limited time, these captains can become special Temporal Agents, recruited to track down and disable probes seeded throughout the timeline by the Na’kuhl and their allies. 23rd Century Captains created since the launch of Agents of Yesterday on February 14 are already Temporal Agents in this new reward system. All objectives listed below have been kept track of on currently created characters. All 23rd Century captains created before April 4, 2017 will also be able to take part in this system.

Temporal Agents will play through all of the usual story missions, but in many of them they’ll uncover probes left by the Na’kuhl to gather intel or drop off equipment for enemy operatives. By completing puzzles, Temporal Agent captains can unlock those probes and disable them – and get great rewards in the process. In some cases, the interference of the Na’kuhl may result in new enemies or revelation of new secrets in these missions.

In addition to hunting down temporal probes, Temporal Agents will be able to use their special Temporal Transponder item to claim rewards for completing other tasks, such as finishing story arcs, gaining Reputations, completing Duty Officer commendations, finishing Admiralty campaigns and learning Specialization skills. Unlocking these rewards will also earn rewards for other characters on your account, in addition to providing your Temporal Agent with new traits, gear, and bonus marks.

Temporal Agent Rewards

The rewards for playing a new temporal recruit are many – and the tasks are those that many captains will complete as they play through the story arcs. Long-term dedication is also rewarded with new bonuses.

Find Temporal Probes: Finding and disabling Na’kuhl temporal probes in various missions will award your Temporal Agent with a small box of Marks of your choice. Finding half of the temporal probes will additionally award you with the new Trait: Rapid Support, which reduces the cooldown time of your Engineering, Science, and Tactical Fleet Captain ability. Finding all of the probes will unlock an Improved version of the Rapid Support Trait.

Reach Rank of Admiral: At each new rank you’ll gain a package of gear to enhance your space weapons, space equipment, space consoles, or ground equipment – your choice.

Specializations: Earn Specialization Points and spend them on skills in Specialization Trees – complete full trees to earn more credit. You’ll earn experience boosts and special Temporal Agent Tech Upgrades, and upon completion of three full Specialization trees, you’ll earn additional Tech Upgrades and all of your Improved Specialization Traits will be increased to Superior versions – giving you better abilities from Command Frequency (Command spec), Predictive Algorithms (Intel spec), Pedal to the Metal (Pilot spec), and Linear Progression (Temporal Operative spec) for all captains on your account.

Research & Development: Reaching level 1 in any R&D school grants you five R&D Duty Officers as well as a Rare Aegis Duty Officer. Reaching level 5 in any R&D school grants you a one-time boost of any school to level 10.

Play through Story Arcs: You’ll gain packages of Fleet Marks, Dilithium, and Energy Credits for playing through each Story Arc, including everything through the Breen arc, as well as the Delta Quadrant arc, the Future Proof arc, and the new Yesterday’s War arc. Finishing half of the Story Arcs unlocks the new Trait: Critical Systems, which grants a bonus to critical hit and critical severity for a short time after using any Emergency Power ability. Completing all of the Story Arcs grants an Improved version of this Trait for all characters on your account.

Admiralty: As you complete tiers of various Admiralty campaigns you’ll gain bonus one-time ship cards and pass tokens. Reaching level 3 in three Admiralty campaigns will give you a bonus that permanently gives you extra experience earned from completion of Admiralty assignments for all captains on your account.

Reputations: Persevere in gaining Reputations and you’ll gain bonus Energy Credits, Dilithium vouchers for use in Reputation Stores, and bonus Marks so that you can purchase the special gear offered by Reputations. When you reach rank 5 in all nine current reputations – Task Force Omega, Temporal Defense Initiative, Nukara Strikeforce, New Romulus, Dyson Joint Command, 8472 Counter-Command, Delta Alliance, Iconian Resistance, and Terran Task Force – your Reputation projects will be updated so that any project that awards special gear will now replace Mk XII very rare gear with Mk XIII ultra-rare gear instead.

Duty Officer Commendations: Work toward reaching rank 4 commendations in every category of Duty Officer commendations. You’ll receive assortments of Temporal Investigator Duty Officers of increasing rarity, and when you reach rank 4 in six commendation categories you’ll receive a unique Temporal Investigator Duty Officer of Epic quality for all captains on your account.

Fleet: Join a fleet after level 30 and get a package of Fleet Marks and Fleet Dilithium Vouchers.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

]]>
stos-temporal-agents-now-recruiting Fri, 17 Mar 2017 08:02:34 -0700
<![CDATA[Kirk, Uhura & Spock Fragrances Beaming to Europe]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/kirk-uhura-spock-fragrances-beaming-to-europe

Europe will soon smell wonderful -- and that's because the perfume house Lifestyle Licence will launch a line of fragrances this summer in the European market inspired by Captain Kirk, Lt. Uhura and Spock. Almost as cool, the perfume bottles will be tailor-made to resemble a Star Trek communicator, with each bottle representative of the color of the respective character's uniform.

According to Lifestyle License:

Star Trek

The James T. Kirk fragrance will be released in a transparent black with gold detail. Kirk’s composition has an emotional masculine impact inspired by the truly brave charisma of Captain James T. Kirk. The high-quality creation is initiated by bergamot, lavender, apple and grapefruit chords which gently but determinately introduce into the floral and very coherent heart note consisting of lily of valley, rose, geranium and violet. This versatile composition is supported by a warm base note created out of tonka, cinnamon, leather, sandalwood and patchouli that completes this intense fragrance experience. 


Star Trek

The Uhura fragrance will be released in red with gold detail. The fragrance is a floral composition that resembles the soul of a woman who did so much for emancipation, not only on board of the U.S.S. Enterprise, but also in real life. The harmonious arrangement of this Eau de Parfum starts with fruity top notes consisting of bergamot, mango, grapefruit and neroli. The heart note presents itself more flowery with premium chords of orange blossoms, violet leaves and jasmine. The combination of cedarwood, musk, amber, and sandalwood is used to grant this perfume with Uhura’s sensuality and to complete this all in all perfect creation.  


Star Trek

The Spock fragrance will be released in blue with silver detail. The Spock scent goes hand in hand with its character and sets an aura of superior logic and intellect. A noble mixture of tangerine, cardamom and pineapple opens this excellent aromatic fragrance creation within its top note. This harmonious scent accord leads into the warm heart note which is dominated by lavender, violet leaves and pink pepper. To round off this exquisite arrangement of high-quality perfumery ingredients and to complete this outstanding composition, patchouli, suede and cedarwood have been used for the base note.

The Kirk and Spock fragrances are for men and will come as individual 50 ml Eau de Toilettes, while the Uhura fragrance is for women and will be available as a 50 ml Eau de Parfum.

Look for the Kirk, Uhura and Spock fragrances in European stores by June 2017.

 

]]>

Europe will soon smell wonderful -- and that's because the perfume house Lifestyle Licence will launch a line of fragrances this summer in the European market inspired by Captain Kirk, Lt. Uhura and Spock. Almost as cool, the perfume bottles will be tailor-made to resemble a Star Trek communicator, with each bottle representative of the color of the respective character's uniform.

According to Lifestyle License:

Star Trek

The James T. Kirk fragrance will be released in a transparent black with gold detail. Kirk’s composition has an emotional masculine impact inspired by the truly brave charisma of Captain James T. Kirk. The high-quality creation is initiated by bergamot, lavender, apple and grapefruit chords which gently but determinately introduce into the floral and very coherent heart note consisting of lily of valley, rose, geranium and violet. This versatile composition is supported by a warm base note created out of tonka, cinnamon, leather, sandalwood and patchouli that completes this intense fragrance experience. 


Star Trek

The Uhura fragrance will be released in red with gold detail. The fragrance is a floral composition that resembles the soul of a woman who did so much for emancipation, not only on board of the U.S.S. Enterprise, but also in real life. The harmonious arrangement of this Eau de Parfum starts with fruity top notes consisting of bergamot, mango, grapefruit and neroli. The heart note presents itself more flowery with premium chords of orange blossoms, violet leaves and jasmine. The combination of cedarwood, musk, amber, and sandalwood is used to grant this perfume with Uhura’s sensuality and to complete this all in all perfect creation.  


Star Trek

The Spock fragrance will be released in blue with silver detail. The Spock scent goes hand in hand with its character and sets an aura of superior logic and intellect. A noble mixture of tangerine, cardamom and pineapple opens this excellent aromatic fragrance creation within its top note. This harmonious scent accord leads into the warm heart note which is dominated by lavender, violet leaves and pink pepper. To round off this exquisite arrangement of high-quality perfumery ingredients and to complete this outstanding composition, patchouli, suede and cedarwood have been used for the base note.

The Kirk and Spock fragrances are for men and will come as individual 50 ml Eau de Toilettes, while the Uhura fragrance is for women and will be available as a 50 ml Eau de Parfum.

Look for the Kirk, Uhura and Spock fragrances in European stores by June 2017.

 

]]>
kirk-uhura-spock-fragrances-beaming-to-europe Fri, 17 Mar 2017 07:46:37 -0700
<![CDATA[Masterson to Moderate "Gender Gap" Panel at U.N.]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/masterson-to-moderate-gender-gap-panel-at-u-n

Chase Masterson, on Friday at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, will moderate "Closing the Gender Gap in Entertainment: Systemic Social Change Through Media," a panel which the actress/singer/activist -- and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's Leeta -- is also producing. The panel will feature Women’s March on Washington chair Carmen Perez and Teen Vogue editor Lauren Duca. 

"It is a supreme honor to moderate this groundbreaking panel on the intersection of pop culture and women’s equality, as well as its economic implications,” Masterson told StarTrek.com. “Research shows that when more women are hired in entertainment, both on camera and in production, more women’s stories are told, and women are empowered in countless ways. I have always been an advocate for women, but the integrity of Star Trek’s message of equality has resonated with me increasingly due to DS9. The future is a place of unremitting inclusivity. Let’s make that future start now.”

Co-sponsors for the event are the United Nations Association, San Diego Chapter, where Masterson serves on the Advisory Board, and Pop Culture Hero Coalition, which Masterson founded with anti-bullying expert Carrie Goldman in 2013. The Coalition is the first non-profit to make a stand against bullying, misogyny, racism and other forms of hate, using stories from TV, comics and film. They work in schools, comic-cons and communities.

The notable list of panelists participating in Friday's event will include Bettina Hausmann, president & executive director of the UN Association, San Diego Chapter; Ravi Karkara, UN Women co-chair, Policy Strategy Group, World We Want 2020; comics icon and inclusivity advocate Gail Simone; Coalition co-founder and award-winning author Carrie Goldman (Bullied: What Every Parent Teacher and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear); author and founder of Geek Girl Con, Jennifer K. Stuller; and author Dr. Janina Scarlet (Superhero Therapy).

Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"This fact also doesn’t escape me: both as an employee of Quark’s, and then as the wife of a Ferengi, Leeta was never expected to speak out, or to have any strength or voice of her own." Masterson said. "She was basically expected to exist in service to men, objectified. But she didn’t conform to those stereotypes. Originally, some people saw Chase in the same way. So, yeah, not bad, for a Dabo Girl.”

The event will be live-streamed on Facebook at the Pop Culture Coalition page and the United Nations Association San Diego Chapter page on Friday, March 17 from 10:30 a.m. to 12 pm Eastern; it will be archived on those pages.

For more information, follow @SuperheroIRL, @UNASanDiego, and/or @Chase Masterson on Twitter.

 

]]>

Chase Masterson, on Friday at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, will moderate "Closing the Gender Gap in Entertainment: Systemic Social Change Through Media," a panel which the actress/singer/activist -- and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's Leeta -- is also producing. The panel will feature Women’s March on Washington chair Carmen Perez and Teen Vogue editor Lauren Duca. 

"It is a supreme honor to moderate this groundbreaking panel on the intersection of pop culture and women’s equality, as well as its economic implications,” Masterson told StarTrek.com. “Research shows that when more women are hired in entertainment, both on camera and in production, more women’s stories are told, and women are empowered in countless ways. I have always been an advocate for women, but the integrity of Star Trek’s message of equality has resonated with me increasingly due to DS9. The future is a place of unremitting inclusivity. Let’s make that future start now.”

Co-sponsors for the event are the United Nations Association, San Diego Chapter, where Masterson serves on the Advisory Board, and Pop Culture Hero Coalition, which Masterson founded with anti-bullying expert Carrie Goldman in 2013. The Coalition is the first non-profit to make a stand against bullying, misogyny, racism and other forms of hate, using stories from TV, comics and film. They work in schools, comic-cons and communities.

The notable list of panelists participating in Friday's event will include Bettina Hausmann, president & executive director of the UN Association, San Diego Chapter; Ravi Karkara, UN Women co-chair, Policy Strategy Group, World We Want 2020; comics icon and inclusivity advocate Gail Simone; Coalition co-founder and award-winning author Carrie Goldman (Bullied: What Every Parent Teacher and Kid Needs to Know About Ending the Cycle of Fear); author and founder of Geek Girl Con, Jennifer K. Stuller; and author Dr. Janina Scarlet (Superhero Therapy).

Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"This fact also doesn’t escape me: both as an employee of Quark’s, and then as the wife of a Ferengi, Leeta was never expected to speak out, or to have any strength or voice of her own." Masterson said. "She was basically expected to exist in service to men, objectified. But she didn’t conform to those stereotypes. Originally, some people saw Chase in the same way. So, yeah, not bad, for a Dabo Girl.”

The event will be live-streamed on Facebook at the Pop Culture Coalition page and the United Nations Association San Diego Chapter page on Friday, March 17 from 10:30 a.m. to 12 pm Eastern; it will be archived on those pages.

For more information, follow @SuperheroIRL, @UNASanDiego, and/or @Chase Masterson on Twitter.

 

]]>
masterson-to-moderate-gender-gap-panel-at-u-n Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:38:26 -0700
<![CDATA[Ten For Ward -- 30 Years of TNG Novels ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/ten-for-ward-30-years-of-tng-novels

Thirty years of Star Trek: The Next Generation novels. Wait... really?

Yeah, really.

(Warning: Completely self-serving post ahead!)

Thanks to an unrelated post I happened across on Facebook, I was reminded that 2017, in addition to marking the 30th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation, means that novels based on the show are also sharing in that milestone.

Unlike those based on the original Star Trek series, TNG novels published by Pocket Books were hitting shelves even while the show itself was still very minty fresh. The first novel, Encounter at Farpoint, written by David Gerrold, is a novelization of the show’s 2-part premiere episode. The first original TNG tie-in novel, Ghost Ship by Diane Carey, wouldn’t hit shelves until the following summer, but hey, Farpoint totally counts, as it definitely started the clock so far as books tying into this new era of Star Trek.

Star Trek

(This copy of Encounter at Farpoint is the very book I bought at a Waldenbooks in late September 1987, as I along with fellow Trekkies eagerly awaited the series' premiere. This was also right around the time Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was showing up on VHS that was cheap enough to buy rather than just rent, and the tape included a trailer for the new show. Those were the days, amirite?)

I have to be honest... I quit counting the number of Star Trek novels a long time ago, so I can’t tell you how many TNG books there’ve been. However, I can list some of my all-time favorites:

Star Trek

Survivors – Jean Lorrah – January 1989
Strike Zone – Peter David – March 1989

 

Star Trek

Metamorphosis – Jean Lorrah – March 1990
Vendetta – Peter David – May 1991


Star Trek

Q-In-Law – Peter David – October 1991
Requiem – Michael Jan Friedman & Kevin Ryan – October 1994


Star Trek

The Romulan Stratagem – Robert Greenberger – May 1995
Crossover – Michael Jan Friedman – December 1995


Star Trek

Intellivore – Diane Duane – September 2000
Diplomatic Implausibility – Keith R.A. DeCandido – February 2001

I’ll cut it off at 10, but that’s just a sampling. Because of their ties to The Original Series, I also am a fan of books like Federation by Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens, as well the episode novelizations for “Unification” and “Relics,” both penned by Mike Friedman. I’m also not forgetting about more recent entries, such as David Mack’s A Time to Kill and A Time to Heal or his Destiny trilogy, or Bill Leisner’s Losing the Peace, or...

(All right, I’ll stop, now….otherwise, we’ll be here all day. Feel free to offer your favorites in the comments.)

And now here we are, almost 30 years later, and TNG novels are still going strong. It’s been a lot of fun tinkering with Captain Picard and his merry Enterprise band. I just hope they keep letting me do it for a while.

Okay, then. Shameless nostalgia and salesman mode disengaged. We return you to your lives, already in progress.

Check out the "Ten for Ward" Backlist


Dayton Ward is the New York Times bestselling author or co-author of numerous novels and short stories, including a whole bunch of stuff set in the
Star Trek universe, and often working with friend and co-writer Kevin Dilmore. He's also written (or co-written) for Star Trek Communicator, Star Trek Magazine, Syfy.com and Tor.com. As he’s still a big ol' geek at heart, Dayton is known to wax nostalgic about all manner of Star Trek topics over on his own blog, The Fog of Ward. His latest Trek novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Headlong Flight, is available now via Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books as a mass market paperback, unabridged audio download and eBook priced at $7.99 (and $10.99 in Canada). Go to www.simonandschuster.com to purchase it.

 

]]>

Thirty years of Star Trek: The Next Generation novels. Wait... really?

Yeah, really.

(Warning: Completely self-serving post ahead!)

Thanks to an unrelated post I happened across on Facebook, I was reminded that 2017, in addition to marking the 30th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation, means that novels based on the show are also sharing in that milestone.

Unlike those based on the original Star Trek series, TNG novels published by Pocket Books were hitting shelves even while the show itself was still very minty fresh. The first novel, Encounter at Farpoint, written by David Gerrold, is a novelization of the show’s 2-part premiere episode. The first original TNG tie-in novel, Ghost Ship by Diane Carey, wouldn’t hit shelves until the following summer, but hey, Farpoint totally counts, as it definitely started the clock so far as books tying into this new era of Star Trek.

Star Trek

(This copy of Encounter at Farpoint is the very book I bought at a Waldenbooks in late September 1987, as I along with fellow Trekkies eagerly awaited the series' premiere. This was also right around the time Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was showing up on VHS that was cheap enough to buy rather than just rent, and the tape included a trailer for the new show. Those were the days, amirite?)

I have to be honest... I quit counting the number of Star Trek novels a long time ago, so I can’t tell you how many TNG books there’ve been. However, I can list some of my all-time favorites:

Star Trek

Survivors – Jean Lorrah – January 1989
Strike Zone – Peter David – March 1989

 

Star Trek

Metamorphosis – Jean Lorrah – March 1990
Vendetta – Peter David – May 1991


Star Trek

Q-In-Law – Peter David – October 1991
Requiem – Michael Jan Friedman & Kevin Ryan – October 1994


Star Trek

The Romulan Stratagem – Robert Greenberger – May 1995
Crossover – Michael Jan Friedman – December 1995


Star Trek

Intellivore – Diane Duane – September 2000
Diplomatic Implausibility – Keith R.A. DeCandido – February 2001

I’ll cut it off at 10, but that’s just a sampling. Because of their ties to The Original Series, I also am a fan of books like Federation by Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens, as well the episode novelizations for “Unification” and “Relics,” both penned by Mike Friedman. I’m also not forgetting about more recent entries, such as David Mack’s A Time to Kill and A Time to Heal or his Destiny trilogy, or Bill Leisner’s Losing the Peace, or...

(All right, I’ll stop, now….otherwise, we’ll be here all day. Feel free to offer your favorites in the comments.)

And now here we are, almost 30 years later, and TNG novels are still going strong. It’s been a lot of fun tinkering with Captain Picard and his merry Enterprise band. I just hope they keep letting me do it for a while.

Okay, then. Shameless nostalgia and salesman mode disengaged. We return you to your lives, already in progress.

Check out the "Ten for Ward" Backlist


Dayton Ward is the New York Times bestselling author or co-author of numerous novels and short stories, including a whole bunch of stuff set in the
Star Trek universe, and often working with friend and co-writer Kevin Dilmore. He's also written (or co-written) for Star Trek Communicator, Star Trek Magazine, Syfy.com and Tor.com. As he’s still a big ol' geek at heart, Dayton is known to wax nostalgic about all manner of Star Trek topics over on his own blog, The Fog of Ward. His latest Trek novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Headlong Flight, is available now via Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books as a mass market paperback, unabridged audio download and eBook priced at $7.99 (and $10.99 in Canada). Go to www.simonandschuster.com to purchase it.

 

]]>
ten-for-ward-30-years-of-tng-novels Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:06:37 -0700
<![CDATA[FIRST LOOK: TNG 30th Anniversary Pin]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/first-look-tng-30th-anniversary-pin

FanSets has just unveiled their Star Trek: The Next Generation 30th Anniversary Pin, and StarTrek.com has an exclusive First Look. Due out next month, the TNG 30th anniverary pin represents the first magent pin FanSets' Star Trek Collection. The comm badge is the base, while "30" serves as the second layer, and the NCC-1701-D tops the piece as a third layer. A pin version will cost $12.95, while the magnet version will run $14.95.

Star Trek The Next Generation 30th Anniversary Pin

As previously reported, FanSets offers limited-edition Star Trek pins and pin sets, with unique art and technology, designed to appeal to casual and serious Trek collectors alike. The pins feature Star Trek characters, ships, actor autographs, sound effects and music, as well as cutting-edge, patent-pending Augmented Reality (AR) technology. FanSets will produce pins inspired by The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, Enterprise, The Animated Series and feature films 1110.

One of the partners of FanSets is Dan Madsen. A longtime StarTrek.com guest blogger, Madsen is the former founder, president and publisher of both the Official Star Trek Fan Club and Official Star Trek Communicator magazine.

The current pins are available for purchase on the FanSets website at www.fansets.com, and they're taking pre-orders now for the TNG 30th Anniversary pin and magnet.

]]>

FanSets has just unveiled their Star Trek: The Next Generation 30th Anniversary Pin, and StarTrek.com has an exclusive First Look. Due out next month, the TNG 30th anniverary pin represents the first magent pin FanSets' Star Trek Collection. The comm badge is the base, while "30" serves as the second layer, and the NCC-1701-D tops the piece as a third layer. A pin version will cost $12.95, while the magnet version will run $14.95.

Star Trek The Next Generation 30th Anniversary Pin

As previously reported, FanSets offers limited-edition Star Trek pins and pin sets, with unique art and technology, designed to appeal to casual and serious Trek collectors alike. The pins feature Star Trek characters, ships, actor autographs, sound effects and music, as well as cutting-edge, patent-pending Augmented Reality (AR) technology. FanSets will produce pins inspired by The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager, Enterprise, The Animated Series and feature films 1110.

One of the partners of FanSets is Dan Madsen. A longtime StarTrek.com guest blogger, Madsen is the former founder, president and publisher of both the Official Star Trek Fan Club and Official Star Trek Communicator magazine.

The current pins are available for purchase on the FanSets website at www.fansets.com, and they're taking pre-orders now for the TNG 30th Anniversary pin and magnet.

]]>
first-look-tng-30th-anniversary-pin Wed, 15 Mar 2017 06:40:16 -0700
<![CDATA[The RETRO INTERVIEW -- Majel Barrett]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/the-retro-interview-majel-barrett

Many -- too many -- of the people who helped make Star Trek the phenomenon that it is today are sadly no longer with us. But what they helped create, and what they said about doing so, remains out there in the ether, and on the pages of many official, licensed Star Trek publications. StarTrek.com thought it was high time to hear from those voices again, and so we will periodically share interviews via a new feature we're calling Retro Interviews. Today, we're pleased to present a conversation with Majel Barrett, conducted and written by Bill Florence for Star Trek: The Next Generation -- The Official Magazine Series, Vol. 2, which was released in January, 1988. The Official Magazine Series was published by Starlog and ran for all seven seasons of TNG. Starlog also published licensed magazines devoted to the entire run of Deep Space Nine and most of Voyager, as well as to many of the Star Trek feature films. Starlog's longtime editor, David McDonnell, oversaw/edited all of content in each and every one of the publisher's licensed Trek magazines.

Star Trek

Sitting behind her Lincoln Enterprises table at a convention dedicated to Star Trek: The Next Generation, Majel Barrett takes a break from signing autographs and talking with fans. Interested television viewers have joined diehard Star Star fans for the two-day event, eager to get their first glimpse of the show.

Earlier in the day, Barrett introduced slides, character descriptions and live footage from the first segment of The Next Generation, “Encounter at Farpoint.” She has even brought various props from the show’s set and delighted audiences with demonstrations of a “working” Tricorder and Phaser weapon.

Barrett is eager to discuss something she is very excited about: her role in The Next Generation.

Star Trek, The Original Series

“I don’t see much of a future for Christine Chapel,” she notes of her previous Star Trek character. “I really see much more of a future for Majel Barrett playing Lwaxana Troi.” Troi, her character in the new series, is an alien – a Betazoid – and the mother of Enterprise Counselor Deanna Troi.

“Lwaxana is sort of the Auntie Mame of the galaxy,” Barrett says. “She’s a much more fun character, and I can play her forever, because I’m at an age where that’s totally believable. I would like to continue to do that. I could leave Chapel very easily. However, if somebody gave me the chance to do her again, of course I would.”

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Haven

Barrett, as Troi, first appears in the episode, “Haven,” in which she beams aboard the ship to pressure her daughter into an arranged marriage. “Gene (Roddenberry, Barrett’s husband) had said that he thinks there will be another script down the line,” which would feature the character again. “But I would like to have more than one script,” Barrett says. She will be trying very hard to make the part a recurring one. “I would like to put a little pressure on Gene. But the idea of nepotism sticks in his craw sometimes and people tell him, ‘Gee, it looks funny.’ So he’s listening to that more than to my pleas and tears.

“If the audience likes my character in the episode, however, they should write the studio. If they write to Gene, he’ll say, ‘Oh, another one of these,’ and into the wastebasket it goes. I would like the other people involved in Star Trek to find out that, yes, there is SOME interest out there for me.”

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Haven

The cast of The Next Generation garners high praise from Barrett. “These people are not Hollywood stars, they aren’t faces, they aren’t pretty boys and pretty girls,” she says. “These people have a background of mostly stage, and with the exception of LeVar Burton, Patrick Stewart and Wil Wheaton, they’re not widely known. They have been working actors, and they have been doing their thing.” She completes the thought with great emphasis:” They have paid their dues, and THEY ARE GOOD.”

For Barrett, the decision to become an actress was gradual one. “When I was 10 years old, my mother put me in the Cleveland Playhouse, just because I was a backward child,” she recalls. “As I went through school, I felt that this was what I wanted to do, but it was more of an avocation than a vocation. Then, when I graduated from college, I went to law school for a year, but I had been doing acting all the way through. I finally decided that, after flunking Contracts, a six-credit course, I really didn’t want to take it again, and I wasn’t going to be a very good lawyer anyway. So, I went up to New York and gave professional acting a try.”

Star Trek

She attended Flora Stone Mather College of Western Reserve University (now Case Western University) for one year before transferring down to the University of Miami. “I always kid everybody and say I majored in Underwater Basket Weaving,” Barrett laughs, “but I actually had a major and minor in Radio & Drama/TV.”

There was no specific actress that Barrett tried to emulate as she trained to become a professional. “I just wanted to be a damn fine actress,” she says. “I saw stardom, fame and notoriety, but mostly I saw work and ability. I can’t honestly say that I had an idol at that time. I loved Katharine Hepburn. I still do. But I would like to be great on my own, in my own way, and do the best that I possibly can.”

The year 1969 saw both the cancellation of the first Star Trek TV series and the marriage of Barrett and Roddenberry. They had met some years before Star Trek, as Barrett explains. “I knew him when I went over to Screen Gems for the first time on interviews. I was introduced to him, and we just became friends for two or three years. I would stop by when I was on the studio lot, and we would have coffee or something. There were no romantic interludes. We became good friends before we ever managed to start dating. And from that point on, it was kismet.”

Star Trek

Barrett credits the creation of Star Trek entirely to her husband’s powerful imagination. “The expression ‘Behind every great man is a great woman’ does not work out here,” she laughs. “If there was any inspiration to give, maybe I inspired him a little. The creativity and the imagination are all his. And as far as writing is concerned, I’m lucky I can sign my own name to the bottom of a check.”

The couple have a 12-year-old son, Rod Jr. who is interested in “girls and wasting time,” according to his mother. Barrett would love to see him follow his parents’ footsteps into show business, “because it has been very good to us,” she says.

A golfer for 17 years, Barrett has played with such people as Harvey Korman, Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott and others. She also attends Star Trek conventions frequently. “It’s not very difficult to come to a place where people look at you adoringly, and where there’s such adulation showered upon you,” Majel Barrett observes. “People here are so nice, so friendly and so warm, and I get so much love that I love to give some of it back.”

 

]]>

Many -- too many -- of the people who helped make Star Trek the phenomenon that it is today are sadly no longer with us. But what they helped create, and what they said about doing so, remains out there in the ether, and on the pages of many official, licensed Star Trek publications. StarTrek.com thought it was high time to hear from those voices again, and so we will periodically share interviews via a new feature we're calling Retro Interviews. Today, we're pleased to present a conversation with Majel Barrett, conducted and written by Bill Florence for Star Trek: The Next Generation -- The Official Magazine Series, Vol. 2, which was released in January, 1988. The Official Magazine Series was published by Starlog and ran for all seven seasons of TNG. Starlog also published licensed magazines devoted to the entire run of Deep Space Nine and most of Voyager, as well as to many of the Star Trek feature films. Starlog's longtime editor, David McDonnell, oversaw/edited all of content in each and every one of the publisher's licensed Trek magazines.

Star Trek

Sitting behind her Lincoln Enterprises table at a convention dedicated to Star Trek: The Next Generation, Majel Barrett takes a break from signing autographs and talking with fans. Interested television viewers have joined diehard Star Star fans for the two-day event, eager to get their first glimpse of the show.

Earlier in the day, Barrett introduced slides, character descriptions and live footage from the first segment of The Next Generation, “Encounter at Farpoint.” She has even brought various props from the show’s set and delighted audiences with demonstrations of a “working” Tricorder and Phaser weapon.

Barrett is eager to discuss something she is very excited about: her role in The Next Generation.

Star Trek, The Original Series

“I don’t see much of a future for Christine Chapel,” she notes of her previous Star Trek character. “I really see much more of a future for Majel Barrett playing Lwaxana Troi.” Troi, her character in the new series, is an alien – a Betazoid – and the mother of Enterprise Counselor Deanna Troi.

“Lwaxana is sort of the Auntie Mame of the galaxy,” Barrett says. “She’s a much more fun character, and I can play her forever, because I’m at an age where that’s totally believable. I would like to continue to do that. I could leave Chapel very easily. However, if somebody gave me the chance to do her again, of course I would.”

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Haven

Barrett, as Troi, first appears in the episode, “Haven,” in which she beams aboard the ship to pressure her daughter into an arranged marriage. “Gene (Roddenberry, Barrett’s husband) had said that he thinks there will be another script down the line,” which would feature the character again. “But I would like to have more than one script,” Barrett says. She will be trying very hard to make the part a recurring one. “I would like to put a little pressure on Gene. But the idea of nepotism sticks in his craw sometimes and people tell him, ‘Gee, it looks funny.’ So he’s listening to that more than to my pleas and tears.

“If the audience likes my character in the episode, however, they should write the studio. If they write to Gene, he’ll say, ‘Oh, another one of these,’ and into the wastebasket it goes. I would like the other people involved in Star Trek to find out that, yes, there is SOME interest out there for me.”

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Haven

The cast of The Next Generation garners high praise from Barrett. “These people are not Hollywood stars, they aren’t faces, they aren’t pretty boys and pretty girls,” she says. “These people have a background of mostly stage, and with the exception of LeVar Burton, Patrick Stewart and Wil Wheaton, they’re not widely known. They have been working actors, and they have been doing their thing.” She completes the thought with great emphasis:” They have paid their dues, and THEY ARE GOOD.”

For Barrett, the decision to become an actress was gradual one. “When I was 10 years old, my mother put me in the Cleveland Playhouse, just because I was a backward child,” she recalls. “As I went through school, I felt that this was what I wanted to do, but it was more of an avocation than a vocation. Then, when I graduated from college, I went to law school for a year, but I had been doing acting all the way through. I finally decided that, after flunking Contracts, a six-credit course, I really didn’t want to take it again, and I wasn’t going to be a very good lawyer anyway. So, I went up to New York and gave professional acting a try.”

Star Trek

She attended Flora Stone Mather College of Western Reserve University (now Case Western University) for one year before transferring down to the University of Miami. “I always kid everybody and say I majored in Underwater Basket Weaving,” Barrett laughs, “but I actually had a major and minor in Radio & Drama/TV.”

There was no specific actress that Barrett tried to emulate as she trained to become a professional. “I just wanted to be a damn fine actress,” she says. “I saw stardom, fame and notoriety, but mostly I saw work and ability. I can’t honestly say that I had an idol at that time. I loved Katharine Hepburn. I still do. But I would like to be great on my own, in my own way, and do the best that I possibly can.”

The year 1969 saw both the cancellation of the first Star Trek TV series and the marriage of Barrett and Roddenberry. They had met some years before Star Trek, as Barrett explains. “I knew him when I went over to Screen Gems for the first time on interviews. I was introduced to him, and we just became friends for two or three years. I would stop by when I was on the studio lot, and we would have coffee or something. There were no romantic interludes. We became good friends before we ever managed to start dating. And from that point on, it was kismet.”

Star Trek

Barrett credits the creation of Star Trek entirely to her husband’s powerful imagination. “The expression ‘Behind every great man is a great woman’ does not work out here,” she laughs. “If there was any inspiration to give, maybe I inspired him a little. The creativity and the imagination are all his. And as far as writing is concerned, I’m lucky I can sign my own name to the bottom of a check.”

The couple have a 12-year-old son, Rod Jr. who is interested in “girls and wasting time,” according to his mother. Barrett would love to see him follow his parents’ footsteps into show business, “because it has been very good to us,” she says.

A golfer for 17 years, Barrett has played with such people as Harvey Korman, Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott and others. She also attends Star Trek conventions frequently. “It’s not very difficult to come to a place where people look at you adoringly, and where there’s such adulation showered upon you,” Majel Barrett observes. “People here are so nice, so friendly and so warm, and I get so much love that I love to give some of it back.”

 

]]>
the-retro-interview-majel-barrett Tue, 14 Mar 2017 09:21:15 -0700
<![CDATA[The Pure Nerdery Joy of the Trek/Green Lantern Comics]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/the-pure-nerdery-joy-of-the-trek-green-lantern-comics

Multiverses are colliding and the result is the boldest and brightest comic book to hit print since... well, since last year.

Star Trek and DC's Green Lantern are at the midpoint of their second crossover event, and the fusion of these two franchises steeped in mythos and boundless realms of nerdery are a marriage made in Stovokor (or the Emerald Space, depending on your beliefs.)

Star Trek

It's doubtful any Star Trek fans haven't at least heard of Green Lantern (he's the guy who flies around with a green ring! Friends with Superman!) but you may not know just how perfect the travails of Hal Jordan of Space Sector 2814 align with that of the Enterprise. Jordan, an Earthling with his share of Kirk-like qualities, is “chosen” to wear a Power Ring and join the Green Lantern Corps, an intergalactic band of space cops.

The Corps is like Deep Space Nine's Promenade on acid – a collection of weirdo aliens from all stretches of the Universe. Many are humanoid (like our friend Tomar-Re, a Xudarian that kinda looks like a chicken-fish) or Kilowog (a broad-chested, gentle giant from Bolovax Vik that kinda looks like a pig-dog.) There are stranger members of the Corps, like Mogo, a sentient planet, or Bzzd, a hornet-like creature from the planet Apiaton. (Bzzd is not the smallest Green Lantern, mind you. That would either be Leezle Pon, super-intelligent smallpox virus, or Dkrtzy RRR, a bio-sentient mathematical equation, but since he takes no shape at all, perhaps he is the largest Green Lantern!)

I'm really just scratching the surface of Green Lantern lore (I haven't even gotten to the Emotional Spectrum which drives rings of other colors) but you don't need to know much before picking up the trade paperback of “The Spectrum War” or the first issue of the current “Stranger Worlds” (which includes a wee summary of the first collection at the beginning.) Most importantly: it looks terrific.

Star Trek

A few of the key members of the Green Lantern stories have been bounced from their universe to the Kelvin Timeline. But there are similarities from their past which jibe with “our” past, even if there are some key differences. It all makes sense, especially now that we've all gotten our heads around Prime vs. Kelvin stories, right? If not, this panel is here for a little tongue-in-cheek acknowledgement.

Star Trek

A Green Lantern villain, Sinestro (a Korugarian who rules the Sinestro Corps from the Antimatter world of Qward empowered by his fear-charged yellow ring!) is currently calling the shots on Qo'noS. Makes sense. Like the Klingons, Sinestro has a code: he wants power, but he also wants order. (Frankly, he'd be a better match with the Cardassians, but other than a stray reference to a drink in an Iowa bar, the Spoonheads haven't shown up in the Kelvin Timeline yet.)

Star Trek

At this point, midway through the second series, it looks like he may have found a way to recharge the power rings that give its wearers the ability not only to fly, but to make constructs of light out of their own imagination. Frequently these are tanks or enormous fly swatters or just brightly colored laser blasts.

It's always been a little vague about how this works, and if in the back of your mind you remember that Green Lanterns were powerless against the color yellow, no, you aren't making that up, but that isn't the case anymore. (Neither is the fact that Alan Scott, the Golden Age or Earth-2 Green Lantern, used to be repelled by wood, but let's not get into all that right now.) All you need to know is that the Power Rings are like the Enterprise's shields, phasers, warp core and replicator all wrapped up into one.

Star Trek

But Sinestro isn't enough to keep our guys busy. You see, there aren't just Green (good) and Yellow (bad) Lanterns, there are Blue and Indigo (good!) and Violet (good now, historically sometimes suspect) Lanterns, and also Orange Lanterns (like the worst Ferengi you ever saw) and Red Lanterns (bad bad bad). In this story the Red Lantern Atrocitus runs afoul of 72 sleeping tubes (uh-oh) and next thing you know he's woken someone up.

The Red Lanterns stand for Rage, but open a thesaurus and you'll find that's pretty close to Wrath, and when we think of that word we think of a very specific guy in any timeline.

Star Trek

I'm not going to say too much more, as I don't want to give the story away. But I will say that as a comic book enthusiast this series is an absolute joy, with bright colors spilling out of every page. The first collection is a steal right now on Comixology and the first three of the second series are currently available at a comic shop near you. You have been chosen.

Jordan Hoffman is a writer, critic and lapsed filmmaker living in New York City. His work can be seen on Film.com, ScreenCrush and Badass Digest. On his BLOG, Jordan has reviewed all 727 Trek episodes and films, most of the comics and some of the novels. Hoffman is also the host of Engage: The Official Star Trek Podcast, from CBS Radio, CBS Local Digital Media and CBS Consumer Products. Engage is available via Play.it/StarTrek, iTunes and StarTrek.com, with new episodes released weekly.

 

]]>

Multiverses are colliding and the result is the boldest and brightest comic book to hit print since... well, since last year.

Star Trek and DC's Green Lantern are at the midpoint of their second crossover event, and the fusion of these two franchises steeped in mythos and boundless realms of nerdery are a marriage made in Stovokor (or the Emerald Space, depending on your beliefs.)

Star Trek

It's doubtful any Star Trek fans haven't at least heard of Green Lantern (he's the guy who flies around with a green ring! Friends with Superman!) but you may not know just how perfect the travails of Hal Jordan of Space Sector 2814 align with that of the Enterprise. Jordan, an Earthling with his share of Kirk-like qualities, is “chosen” to wear a Power Ring and join the Green Lantern Corps, an intergalactic band of space cops.

The Corps is like Deep Space Nine's Promenade on acid – a collection of weirdo aliens from all stretches of the Universe. Many are humanoid (like our friend Tomar-Re, a Xudarian that kinda looks like a chicken-fish) or Kilowog (a broad-chested, gentle giant from Bolovax Vik that kinda looks like a pig-dog.) There are stranger members of the Corps, like Mogo, a sentient planet, or Bzzd, a hornet-like creature from the planet Apiaton. (Bzzd is not the smallest Green Lantern, mind you. That would either be Leezle Pon, super-intelligent smallpox virus, or Dkrtzy RRR, a bio-sentient mathematical equation, but since he takes no shape at all, perhaps he is the largest Green Lantern!)

I'm really just scratching the surface of Green Lantern lore (I haven't even gotten to the Emotional Spectrum which drives rings of other colors) but you don't need to know much before picking up the trade paperback of “The Spectrum War” or the first issue of the current “Stranger Worlds” (which includes a wee summary of the first collection at the beginning.) Most importantly: it looks terrific.

Star Trek

A few of the key members of the Green Lantern stories have been bounced from their universe to the Kelvin Timeline. But there are similarities from their past which jibe with “our” past, even if there are some key differences. It all makes sense, especially now that we've all gotten our heads around Prime vs. Kelvin stories, right? If not, this panel is here for a little tongue-in-cheek acknowledgement.

Star Trek

A Green Lantern villain, Sinestro (a Korugarian who rules the Sinestro Corps from the Antimatter world of Qward empowered by his fear-charged yellow ring!) is currently calling the shots on Qo'noS. Makes sense. Like the Klingons, Sinestro has a code: he wants power, but he also wants order. (Frankly, he'd be a better match with the Cardassians, but other than a stray reference to a drink in an Iowa bar, the Spoonheads haven't shown up in the Kelvin Timeline yet.)

Star Trek

At this point, midway through the second series, it looks like he may have found a way to recharge the power rings that give its wearers the ability not only to fly, but to make constructs of light out of their own imagination. Frequently these are tanks or enormous fly swatters or just brightly colored laser blasts.

It's always been a little vague about how this works, and if in the back of your mind you remember that Green Lanterns were powerless against the color yellow, no, you aren't making that up, but that isn't the case anymore. (Neither is the fact that Alan Scott, the Golden Age or Earth-2 Green Lantern, used to be repelled by wood, but let's not get into all that right now.) All you need to know is that the Power Rings are like the Enterprise's shields, phasers, warp core and replicator all wrapped up into one.

Star Trek

But Sinestro isn't enough to keep our guys busy. You see, there aren't just Green (good) and Yellow (bad) Lanterns, there are Blue and Indigo (good!) and Violet (good now, historically sometimes suspect) Lanterns, and also Orange Lanterns (like the worst Ferengi you ever saw) and Red Lanterns (bad bad bad). In this story the Red Lantern Atrocitus runs afoul of 72 sleeping tubes (uh-oh) and next thing you know he's woken someone up.

The Red Lanterns stand for Rage, but open a thesaurus and you'll find that's pretty close to Wrath, and when we think of that word we think of a very specific guy in any timeline.

Star Trek

I'm not going to say too much more, as I don't want to give the story away. But I will say that as a comic book enthusiast this series is an absolute joy, with bright colors spilling out of every page. The first collection is a steal right now on Comixology and the first three of the second series are currently available at a comic shop near you. You have been chosen.

Jordan Hoffman is a writer, critic and lapsed filmmaker living in New York City. His work can be seen on Film.com, ScreenCrush and Badass Digest. On his BLOG, Jordan has reviewed all 727 Trek episodes and films, most of the comics and some of the novels. Hoffman is also the host of Engage: The Official Star Trek Podcast, from CBS Radio, CBS Local Digital Media and CBS Consumer Products. Engage is available via Play.it/StarTrek, iTunes and StarTrek.com, with new episodes released weekly.

 

]]>
the-pure-nerdery-joy-of-the-trek-green-lantern-comics Tue, 14 Mar 2017 07:09:58 -0700
<![CDATA[New Personal Elevator Resembles Trek's Turbolift]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/new-personal-elevator-resembles-treks-turbolift

The future is now. Yes, once again, Star Trek's sci-fi has influenced present-day reality. The latest example is a little something called the Lifestyle Home Elevator, a rectangular, futuristic-looking private elevator powered by hydraulics in the guide leg. It most definitely resembles a turbolift, right?

According to its British manufacturer, Terry Lifts, the Lifestyle Home Lift is ideal for "when stairs become too much," enabling the user to stay in their own home rather than have to relocate. Deck 42, please.

 

]]>

The future is now. Yes, once again, Star Trek's sci-fi has influenced present-day reality. The latest example is a little something called the Lifestyle Home Elevator, a rectangular, futuristic-looking private elevator powered by hydraulics in the guide leg. It most definitely resembles a turbolift, right?

According to its British manufacturer, Terry Lifts, the Lifestyle Home Lift is ideal for "when stairs become too much," enabling the user to stay in their own home rather than have to relocate. Deck 42, please.

 

]]>
new-personal-elevator-resembles-treks-turbolift Mon, 13 Mar 2017 09:04:57 -0700
<![CDATA[More Tiny Trek Figures Ready to Beam Up]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/more-tiny-trek-figures-ready-to-beam-up

Set your phasers to stunningly cute, as Titan Vinyl Figures has released a set of "Where No Man Has Gone Before" Collection blind boxes featuring 16 tiny (3"-tall) Trek figures.

Among the figures are Kirk, Spock, Bones, Chapel, Rand, Scotty, Sulu, Uhura, Pike, Gorn, Khan, Vina, Balok and Talosian Keeper, as well as special Kirk Chase and Sulu Chase figures. And your mission is to collect them all.

Star Trek

Did we mention that Sulu Chase can also come... shirtless?! Or that some figures come with a character-specific accessory or two?

The "Where No Man Has Gone Before" Collection blind boxes are in stock now at ThinkGeek.com and priced at $9.99 each. Go to www.thinkgeek.com to purchase them.

 

]]>

Set your phasers to stunningly cute, as Titan Vinyl Figures has released a set of "Where No Man Has Gone Before" Collection blind boxes featuring 16 tiny (3"-tall) Trek figures.

Among the figures are Kirk, Spock, Bones, Chapel, Rand, Scotty, Sulu, Uhura, Pike, Gorn, Khan, Vina, Balok and Talosian Keeper, as well as special Kirk Chase and Sulu Chase figures. And your mission is to collect them all.

Star Trek

Did we mention that Sulu Chase can also come... shirtless?! Or that some figures come with a character-specific accessory or two?

The "Where No Man Has Gone Before" Collection blind boxes are in stock now at ThinkGeek.com and priced at $9.99 each. Go to www.thinkgeek.com to purchase them.

 

]]>
more-tiny-trek-figures-ready-to-beam-up Sun, 12 Mar 2017 09:27:15 -0700
<![CDATA[Best Episode Ever First Round Poll Results]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/best-episode-ever-first-round-poll-results

StarTrek.com's mission to determine Star Trek's best-ever episode is underway, with voting complete on our first preliminary round, with choosing from the following:  "All Good Things…," "Call to Arms," "The City on the Edge of Forever," "The Doomsday Machine," "In a Mirror, Darkly," "Timeless," "Unification," "The Way of the Warrior," "What You Leave Behind" and "Yesterday's Enterprise."
Nearly 20,000 fans voted and here are the results.


Star Trek, The Original Series

"The City on the Edge of Forever" (25%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"All Good Things..." (19%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"Yesterday's Enterprise" (18%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"What You Leave Behind" (7%, 1227 votes)


Star Trek, The Original Series

"The Doomsday Machine (7%, 1149 votes)


Star Trek, Enterprise

"In a Mirror, Darkly" (6%)

 
Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"The Way of the Warrior (5%, 871 votes)


Star Trek, Voyager

"Timeless" (5%, 829 votes)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"Call to Arms" (5%, 793 votes)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"Unification" (4%)


As previously reported, we started with 40 episodes from across the franchise, with the episodes having been "seeded" based on previous "Best Of" polls we've conducted over the past few years. We're holding four (4) preliminary rounds of 10 episodes each. Based upon votes from you, our readers, the top two episodes in each round will move on to the finals, with the two remaining episodes that elicit the most votes serving as wild card entries in the finals. Let's find out what the options are for Round 2!

]]>

StarTrek.com's mission to determine Star Trek's best-ever episode is underway, with voting complete on our first preliminary round, with choosing from the following:  "All Good Things…," "Call to Arms," "The City on the Edge of Forever," "The Doomsday Machine," "In a Mirror, Darkly," "Timeless," "Unification," "The Way of the Warrior," "What You Leave Behind" and "Yesterday's Enterprise."
Nearly 20,000 fans voted and here are the results.


Star Trek, The Original Series

"The City on the Edge of Forever" (25%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"All Good Things..." (19%)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"Yesterday's Enterprise" (18%)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"What You Leave Behind" (7%, 1227 votes)


Star Trek, The Original Series

"The Doomsday Machine (7%, 1149 votes)


Star Trek, Enterprise

"In a Mirror, Darkly" (6%)

 
Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"The Way of the Warrior (5%, 871 votes)


Star Trek, Voyager

"Timeless" (5%, 829 votes)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

"Call to Arms" (5%, 793 votes)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

"Unification" (4%)


As previously reported, we started with 40 episodes from across the franchise, with the episodes having been "seeded" based on previous "Best Of" polls we've conducted over the past few years. We're holding four (4) preliminary rounds of 10 episodes each. Based upon votes from you, our readers, the top two episodes in each round will move on to the finals, with the two remaining episodes that elicit the most votes serving as wild card entries in the finals. Let's find out what the options are for Round 2!

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best-episode-ever-first-round-poll-results Sun, 12 Mar 2017 07:48:08 -0700
<![CDATA[Brand-New Trek Hoodies & Tees Available Now ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/brand-new-trek-hoodies-tees-available-now

The Star Trek Shop here at StarTrek.com just beamed up an array of brand-new Trek-themed t-shirts and hoodies -- and there's something for everyone. Among the options are:


Star Trek Store

Assimilate or Die Hoodie. Priced at $49.95, it's available in sizes ranging from small to XXL. Go HERE to purchase. The t-shirt version costs $24.95. Go HERE for it.


Star Trek Store

Are you a M.A.C.O. -- or want to be? The Enterprise MACO t-shirt is in stock now, priced at $24.95 and available in sizes small to XXL. Click HERE to snag it.


Star Trek Store

The Enterprise Patch Hoodie comes in sizes from small to XXL and costs $49.95. Warp HERE to buy it. And the t-shirt version costs $24.95 and is available in the same sizes. Go HERE to make it yours.


Star Trek Store

Star Trek Store

Klingon fan, are you? Well, the Star Trek Shop offers a new quartet of black t-shirts featuring Klingon sayings (in Klingon, of course), over a Klingon logo. All the shirts cost $24.95 and come in sizes small to XXL. Go HERE for "Honor Is More Important Than Life," HERE for "May You Die Well," HERE for "Stop Talking, Drink," and HERE for "To Really Succeed, You Must Enjoy Eating Poison."


Star Trek Store

And, lastly, there's the Starfleet Recruitment Poster Hoodie, which reads "See the Galaxy. Join Starfleet" beneath a colorful image of the Enterprise in flight. The hoodie costs $49.95, with sizes spanning from small to XXL, and is available HERE. The t-shirt version is available in the same sizes and is priced at $24.95. Go HERE for it.

 

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The Star Trek Shop here at StarTrek.com just beamed up an array of brand-new Trek-themed t-shirts and hoodies -- and there's something for everyone. Among the options are:


Star Trek Store

Assimilate or Die Hoodie. Priced at $49.95, it's available in sizes ranging from small to XXL. Go HERE to purchase. The t-shirt version costs $24.95. Go HERE for it.


Star Trek Store

Are you a M.A.C.O. -- or want to be? The Enterprise MACO t-shirt is in stock now, priced at $24.95 and available in sizes small to XXL. Click HERE to snag it.


Star Trek Store

The Enterprise Patch Hoodie comes in sizes from small to XXL and costs $49.95. Warp HERE to buy it. And the t-shirt version costs $24.95 and is available in the same sizes. Go HERE to make it yours.


Star Trek Store

Star Trek Store

Klingon fan, are you? Well, the Star Trek Shop offers a new quartet of black t-shirts featuring Klingon sayings (in Klingon, of course), over a Klingon logo. All the shirts cost $24.95 and come in sizes small to XXL. Go HERE for "Honor Is More Important Than Life," HERE for "May You Die Well," HERE for "Stop Talking, Drink," and HERE for "To Really Succeed, You Must Enjoy Eating Poison."


Star Trek Store

And, lastly, there's the Starfleet Recruitment Poster Hoodie, which reads "See the Galaxy. Join Starfleet" beneath a colorful image of the Enterprise in flight. The hoodie costs $49.95, with sizes spanning from small to XXL, and is available HERE. The t-shirt version is available in the same sizes and is priced at $24.95. Go HERE for it.

 

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brand-new-trek-hoodies-tees-available-now Sat, 11 Mar 2017 06:06:43 -0800