Star Trek Latest News http://startrek.com Star Trek Latest News Fri, 24 Feb 2017 05:19:35 -0800 info@startrek.com (Star Trek Team) en <![CDATA[Catching Up with Voyager guest star Musetta Vander]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-voyager-guest-star-musetta-vander

What do Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, Wild Wild West, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Kicking & Screaming and Hawaii Five-0, not to mention Star Trek: Voyager and music videos by Alice Cooper, Elton John, Tina Turner, Chris Isaak, Amy Grant and Debbie Gibson have in common? The answer is Musetta Vander, the talented and gorgeous South African actress, model and dancer who appeared in all of the above. She played Sindel in Annihilation, Dr. Loveless’ assistant in Wild Wild West, and the wife of Robert Duvall’s character in Kicking & Screaming. As for Voyager, she guest starred as Derran Tal, the Varro assistant engineer who romanced Harry Kim in “The Disease.” That episode aired on Feb. 24, 1999, or a mind-boggling 18 years ago today. And that made now the perfect time to catch up with Musetta for an interview…


Star Trek

Let’s start with the present. Where do you call home these days? Are you still teaching Qigong? How does Qigong help you better contend with the stresses of life?

I've been living in Los Angeles since my arrival to the States. I love it here because it's so diverse and has a variety of everything I love to do. Great beaches, beautiful mountains diverse scenery, Hollywood, the entertainment business and a melting pot of cultures. There’s always something exciting to do, learn or go see. Yes, I still practice and teach Qigong. Qigong changed my life and saved me from debilitating spinal surgery. I was fortunate to have a wonderful teacher who shared this amazing healing system with me many years ago. And in turn I like to share it with others. I had to learn from a direct and painful experience, but it provided an invaluable opportunity to practice what I preach and made me a firm believer in the healing power of Qi. It changed my way of thinking and showed me the wonderful healing potential we all carry within.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

For those unfamiliar with Qigong, how would you explain it?

The word Qi simply means energy and gong means skill. It refers to the skillful practice of gathering, circulating and applying this life-force energy. Science refers to it as bio-electricity. It uses breathing techniques, gentle movement and meditation to cleanse, strengthen and circulate this energy or Qi, leading to better health and vitality and a tranquil state of mind. The primary goal is to purge toxic emotions from within the body's tissues, eliminate energetic stagnations, as well as strengthen and balance the internal organs and energetic fields. Our bodies are highly intelligent. It wants to survive regardless of what we put it through. Pain or discomfort is the way it communicates its needs to the mind. However, we don't usually listen until we end up at a crisis point. We can save ourselves a lot of pain and trouble by paying attention to the signals it sends us, no matter how small, and, more importantly, taking note of our internal world to see where we find ourselves “living” emotionally and mentally. We are more than just our physical bodies, and emotions have a strong connection to our wellbeing. Your body speaks your mind, so listen up. Dis-ease doesn't come out of nowhere.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

You just appeared in an episode of Hawaii Five-0. How did you enjoy that experience?

I loved it! How could anyone not love working in Hawaii? It was a dream come true. The cast was lovely and I got to play an interesting role while working on the North Shore. Ironically, many years back, I did a movie called Under the Hula Moon in which the main character, played by Steven Baldwin, was obsessed with Steve McGarrett and Hawaii Five-0 (The older version of the TV show). Life came full circle on this one when I got the job. It was a wonderful experience and I even got to take a surf lesson on my day off. There was actually a really funny coincidence as the surf break the instructor picked to learn happened to be right behind where the crew and cast were set up to film that day, and we had no idea. When we showed up at 5am with our long boards, we were shocked to find the entire production there. I heard an announcement over the walkie that sounded like this: “Um, will it be a problem if we see Sheriff Alana surfing in the background in our shots…?” It was too funny! Luckily, it wasn't a problem as I was far away and the camera wasn’t really focused in our direction.

 

Tell us a little about each of your upcoming films, Spreading Darkness, Alice: The Darkness and Shine.

Shine is a dance movie about two brothers who we're once East Harlem's best Salsa dancers and were separated after the death of their father, only to be reunited years later on opposing ends of gentrification. I play a lawyer. Being an ex-dancer myself, it was great to be part of a dance movie, even though I don’t get to dance in it. I love the dance world and they did a really good job. Alice is a horror movie in which I have a smaller role. I play a teacher. And in Spreading Darkness I play a cool character, the Grim Reaper. That was fun.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

Trek fans know you from your Voyager episode, but if people run into you on the street, what of your other performances are they most eager to talk about with you? We’re assuming Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, Wild Wild West, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Kicking & Screaming, and a few of your music videos. So, those and what else?

All of the above are very popular, especially O Brother , Where Art Thou? Most sci-fi fans love also love Stargate, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Babylon 5. But I recently had someone ask about Criminal Minds and NCIS. So, it really depends on who you talk to.


Star Trek, Voyager

How aware of Star Trek were you before Voyager came along?

I was very aware of Star Trek. I loved the show and all the characters. They were always so interesting, and boldly went where no man has gone before. I got to work with George Takei early in my career in Oblivion and Backlash. There was a midnight opening screening of Oblivion opening night and I remember wondering who would show up at that time? To my surprise, the theatre was packed. Fans drove for miles to come see George.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

How did you land your role as Derran Tal in “The Disease”?

I auditioned. Originally, I booked a different episode, but due to a scheduling conflict I couldn't do it. I think I was going to be Tuvok’s love interest in an episode. But I was very fortunate, as they offered me “The Disease” instead.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What intrigued you most about the storyline, and how Tal played such a major role in pushing the story - and the disease -- forward?

I felt very connected to the role. I love to explore and travel myself, especially to visit unfamiliar places. Like Tal, I would’ve hated to be prevented from pursuing my passion or dreams. I loved her adventurous and rebellious spirit and her fearlessness.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

How did you enjoy working with the Voyager cast, especially Garrett Wang?

They were very welcoming and gracious. Stepping in as a guest star on a well-oiled hit show can be a little intimidating at times, but they made me feel at home right away. The first scene I filmed was where I beamed onto the shuttlecraft with Garrett. I think my natural excitement seeped into the performance, as I couldn't believe I was actually working on an episode of Voyager.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What other anecdotes can you share about the episode?

In the bedroom scene with Garrett, we were about to shoot and heard some muffled discussions going on behind me, only to discover they were talking about my feet. I had been walking around barefoot on set just before I got onto the bed and apparently, the soles of my feet were black. Someone very sweetly came over to clean the soles of my feet. I was so self-conscious as everyone had to wait for me. Now I always check the soles of my feet on set if I happen to be barefoot.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What was the moment in “The Disease” that you just couldn't wait to get on the stage to play? And why were you so excited to play it?

All of it, but I loved the scene where Tal confronts Janeway and Jippeq and refuses to go along with the majority. She fought for her freedom regardless of the consequences.


Star Trek, The Original Series

If you could play any character from Trek other than the one you played, who would you want to play -- and why?

Mr. Spock, because he’s super cool and very different from everyone else. He’s the epitome of equanimity amidst intensity. Besides, I love his look and the Vulcan death grip.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

Star Trek just celebrated its 50th anniversary year. What does it mean to you to be a part of the franchise on this huge occasion?

I feel very fortunate and blessed to have had the opportunity to be a part of such a wonderful show. I love the show and all the Trekkies. I believe this legend will continue for many generations to come. Who knows, maybe one day they’ll run into Tal in a galaxy somewhere? That would be awesome.

]]>

What do Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, Wild Wild West, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Kicking & Screaming and Hawaii Five-0, not to mention Star Trek: Voyager and music videos by Alice Cooper, Elton John, Tina Turner, Chris Isaak, Amy Grant and Debbie Gibson have in common? The answer is Musetta Vander, the talented and gorgeous South African actress, model and dancer who appeared in all of the above. She played Sindel in Annihilation, Dr. Loveless’ assistant in Wild Wild West, and the wife of Robert Duvall’s character in Kicking & Screaming. As for Voyager, she guest starred as Derran Tal, the Varro assistant engineer who romanced Harry Kim in “The Disease.” That episode aired on Feb. 24, 1999, or a mind-boggling 18 years ago today. And that made now the perfect time to catch up with Musetta for an interview…


Star Trek

Let’s start with the present. Where do you call home these days? Are you still teaching Qigong? How does Qigong help you better contend with the stresses of life?

I've been living in Los Angeles since my arrival to the States. I love it here because it's so diverse and has a variety of everything I love to do. Great beaches, beautiful mountains diverse scenery, Hollywood, the entertainment business and a melting pot of cultures. There’s always something exciting to do, learn or go see. Yes, I still practice and teach Qigong. Qigong changed my life and saved me from debilitating spinal surgery. I was fortunate to have a wonderful teacher who shared this amazing healing system with me many years ago. And in turn I like to share it with others. I had to learn from a direct and painful experience, but it provided an invaluable opportunity to practice what I preach and made me a firm believer in the healing power of Qi. It changed my way of thinking and showed me the wonderful healing potential we all carry within.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

For those unfamiliar with Qigong, how would you explain it?

The word Qi simply means energy and gong means skill. It refers to the skillful practice of gathering, circulating and applying this life-force energy. Science refers to it as bio-electricity. It uses breathing techniques, gentle movement and meditation to cleanse, strengthen and circulate this energy or Qi, leading to better health and vitality and a tranquil state of mind. The primary goal is to purge toxic emotions from within the body's tissues, eliminate energetic stagnations, as well as strengthen and balance the internal organs and energetic fields. Our bodies are highly intelligent. It wants to survive regardless of what we put it through. Pain or discomfort is the way it communicates its needs to the mind. However, we don't usually listen until we end up at a crisis point. We can save ourselves a lot of pain and trouble by paying attention to the signals it sends us, no matter how small, and, more importantly, taking note of our internal world to see where we find ourselves “living” emotionally and mentally. We are more than just our physical bodies, and emotions have a strong connection to our wellbeing. Your body speaks your mind, so listen up. Dis-ease doesn't come out of nowhere.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

You just appeared in an episode of Hawaii Five-0. How did you enjoy that experience?

I loved it! How could anyone not love working in Hawaii? It was a dream come true. The cast was lovely and I got to play an interesting role while working on the North Shore. Ironically, many years back, I did a movie called Under the Hula Moon in which the main character, played by Steven Baldwin, was obsessed with Steve McGarrett and Hawaii Five-0 (The older version of the TV show). Life came full circle on this one when I got the job. It was a wonderful experience and I even got to take a surf lesson on my day off. There was actually a really funny coincidence as the surf break the instructor picked to learn happened to be right behind where the crew and cast were set up to film that day, and we had no idea. When we showed up at 5am with our long boards, we were shocked to find the entire production there. I heard an announcement over the walkie that sounded like this: “Um, will it be a problem if we see Sheriff Alana surfing in the background in our shots…?” It was too funny! Luckily, it wasn't a problem as I was far away and the camera wasn’t really focused in our direction.

 

Tell us a little about each of your upcoming films, Spreading Darkness, Alice: The Darkness and Shine.

Shine is a dance movie about two brothers who we're once East Harlem's best Salsa dancers and were separated after the death of their father, only to be reunited years later on opposing ends of gentrification. I play a lawyer. Being an ex-dancer myself, it was great to be part of a dance movie, even though I don’t get to dance in it. I love the dance world and they did a really good job. Alice is a horror movie in which I have a smaller role. I play a teacher. And in Spreading Darkness I play a cool character, the Grim Reaper. That was fun.


Star Trek, Musetta Vander

Trek fans know you from your Voyager episode, but if people run into you on the street, what of your other performances are they most eager to talk about with you? We’re assuming Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, Wild Wild West, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Kicking & Screaming, and a few of your music videos. So, those and what else?

All of the above are very popular, especially O Brother , Where Art Thou? Most sci-fi fans love also love Stargate, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Babylon 5. But I recently had someone ask about Criminal Minds and NCIS. So, it really depends on who you talk to.


Star Trek, Voyager

How aware of Star Trek were you before Voyager came along?

I was very aware of Star Trek. I loved the show and all the characters. They were always so interesting, and boldly went where no man has gone before. I got to work with George Takei early in my career in Oblivion and Backlash. There was a midnight opening screening of Oblivion opening night and I remember wondering who would show up at that time? To my surprise, the theatre was packed. Fans drove for miles to come see George.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

How did you land your role as Derran Tal in “The Disease”?

I auditioned. Originally, I booked a different episode, but due to a scheduling conflict I couldn't do it. I think I was going to be Tuvok’s love interest in an episode. But I was very fortunate, as they offered me “The Disease” instead.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What intrigued you most about the storyline, and how Tal played such a major role in pushing the story - and the disease -- forward?

I felt very connected to the role. I love to explore and travel myself, especially to visit unfamiliar places. Like Tal, I would’ve hated to be prevented from pursuing my passion or dreams. I loved her adventurous and rebellious spirit and her fearlessness.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

How did you enjoy working with the Voyager cast, especially Garrett Wang?

They were very welcoming and gracious. Stepping in as a guest star on a well-oiled hit show can be a little intimidating at times, but they made me feel at home right away. The first scene I filmed was where I beamed onto the shuttlecraft with Garrett. I think my natural excitement seeped into the performance, as I couldn't believe I was actually working on an episode of Voyager.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What other anecdotes can you share about the episode?

In the bedroom scene with Garrett, we were about to shoot and heard some muffled discussions going on behind me, only to discover they were talking about my feet. I had been walking around barefoot on set just before I got onto the bed and apparently, the soles of my feet were black. Someone very sweetly came over to clean the soles of my feet. I was so self-conscious as everyone had to wait for me. Now I always check the soles of my feet on set if I happen to be barefoot.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

What was the moment in “The Disease” that you just couldn't wait to get on the stage to play? And why were you so excited to play it?

All of it, but I loved the scene where Tal confronts Janeway and Jippeq and refuses to go along with the majority. She fought for her freedom regardless of the consequences.


Star Trek, The Original Series

If you could play any character from Trek other than the one you played, who would you want to play -- and why?

Mr. Spock, because he’s super cool and very different from everyone else. He’s the epitome of equanimity amidst intensity. Besides, I love his look and the Vulcan death grip.


Star Trek, Voyager, The Disease

Star Trek just celebrated its 50th anniversary year. What does it mean to you to be a part of the franchise on this huge occasion?

I feel very fortunate and blessed to have had the opportunity to be a part of such a wonderful show. I love the show and all the Trekkies. I believe this legend will continue for many generations to come. Who knows, maybe one day they’ll run into Tal in a galaxy somewhere? That would be awesome.

]]>
catching-up-with-voyager-guest-star-musetta-vander Fri, 24 Feb 2017 05:19:35 -0800
<![CDATA[STO's "Arena of Sompek" Special Event]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/stos-arena-of-sompek-special-event

The Klingon Empire wants you to... toughen up.

From now until February 27th at 9:00 AM PST, Federation, Klingon and Romulan Republic Captains on PC between levels 50-60 can queue up for our new “Arena of Sompek” event. Enter a Klingon holodeck to train in one of the Empire’s oldest traditions, the qaD HoS - an endless battle against allies and enemies alike.

 

Star Trek, Online

Once the battle starts, it doesn’t end until all captains fall. Between environmental hazards and ever-strengthening enemies, captains will need to keep moving and fight as a team to last as long as they can. The longer you last, the more rewards you will earn, including your choice of Marks.

Star Trek, Online

Can you survive for 100 rounds? Can you prove yourself to be a Hero of the Alliance? Can you earn lots of rewards? Gather your friends, queue up for the “Arena of Sompek,” and we’ll find out.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>

The Klingon Empire wants you to... toughen up.

From now until February 27th at 9:00 AM PST, Federation, Klingon and Romulan Republic Captains on PC between levels 50-60 can queue up for our new “Arena of Sompek” event. Enter a Klingon holodeck to train in one of the Empire’s oldest traditions, the qaD HoS - an endless battle against allies and enemies alike.

 

Star Trek, Online

Once the battle starts, it doesn’t end until all captains fall. Between environmental hazards and ever-strengthening enemies, captains will need to keep moving and fight as a team to last as long as they can. The longer you last, the more rewards you will earn, including your choice of Marks.

Star Trek, Online

Can you survive for 100 rounds? Can you prove yourself to be a Hero of the Alliance? Can you earn lots of rewards? Gather your friends, queue up for the “Arena of Sompek,” and we’ll find out.

For more Star Trek Online news, follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

]]>
stos-arena-of-sompek-special-event Fri, 24 Feb 2017 05:18:46 -0800
<![CDATA[Happy World Bartender Day ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/happy-world-bartender-day

As we at StarTrek.com celebrate World Bartender Day today, the following words come to mind: "Sometimes, a man'll tell his bartender things he'll... never tell his doctor." Dr. Boyce made that comment to Captain Pike in "The Cage," the initial Star Trek: The Original Series pilot, and we wholeheartedly agree. To mark the occasion, we've gathered together a variety of Trek bartender gifs and pics. We've got everyone from Guinan and Ed to Michael Sullivan and Quark, and more. So, raise a bottle of Saurian brandy and toast away, dear friends....


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

Quark


Star Trek, The Original Series

Ed (TOS)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Guinan

Michael Sullivan (Voyager)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

Graife (DS9)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Dessica II Alien Bartender (TNG)


Unidentified Bartender (from TOS & DS9)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Rex (TNG)


Star Trek, Star Trek: First Contact

Dixon Hill Barkeep (Star Trek: First Contact)

]]>

As we at StarTrek.com celebrate World Bartender Day today, the following words come to mind: "Sometimes, a man'll tell his bartender things he'll... never tell his doctor." Dr. Boyce made that comment to Captain Pike in "The Cage," the initial Star Trek: The Original Series pilot, and we wholeheartedly agree. To mark the occasion, we've gathered together a variety of Trek bartender gifs and pics. We've got everyone from Guinan and Ed to Michael Sullivan and Quark, and more. So, raise a bottle of Saurian brandy and toast away, dear friends....


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

Quark


Star Trek, The Original Series

Ed (TOS)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Guinan

Michael Sullivan (Voyager)


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

Graife (DS9)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Dessica II Alien Bartender (TNG)


Unidentified Bartender (from TOS & DS9)


Star Trek, The Next Generation

Rex (TNG)


Star Trek, Star Trek: First Contact

Dixon Hill Barkeep (Star Trek: First Contact)

]]>
happy-world-bartender-day Fri, 24 Feb 2017 05:16:12 -0800
<![CDATA[Mulgrew & More Join the Trek Vegas Guest List ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mulgrew-more-join-the-trek-vegas-guest-list

We’re not kidding when we say that Creation Entertainment is wasting no time whatsoever in assembling its guest list for Star Trek Las Vegas 2017. They’re now up to 70 on the way to at least 100 guests for the annual event, which will be held August 2-6, 2017, at the Rio Suites Hotel. Joining a roster that already includes William Shatner, Sir Patrick Stewart, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Karl Urban, are…


As noted, Star Trek Las Vegas will take place from August 2-6, 2017, at the Rio Suites Hotel in Las Vegas. Go to www.creationent.com for details and to order tickets.

]]>

We’re not kidding when we say that Creation Entertainment is wasting no time whatsoever in assembling its guest list for Star Trek Las Vegas 2017. They’re now up to 70 on the way to at least 100 guests for the annual event, which will be held August 2-6, 2017, at the Rio Suites Hotel. Joining a roster that already includes William Shatner, Sir Patrick Stewart, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Walter Koenig and Karl Urban, are…


As noted, Star Trek Las Vegas will take place from August 2-6, 2017, at the Rio Suites Hotel in Las Vegas. Go to www.creationent.com for details and to order tickets.

]]>
mulgrew-more-join-the-trek-vegas-guest-list Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:06:57 -0800
<![CDATA[Ten for Ward: Trek Books I Wish I'd Written]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/ten-for-ward-trek-books-i-wish-id-written

So, here’s a bit of news: I write Star Trek books.

Specifically, I write Star Trek novels. I make the occasional detour toward other kinds of books, but novels are where I earn most of my bread and butter. I’m also a book collector. I love all kinds of books, from novels to books about history or film or the space program, to comics and graphic novels and whatever other bits of weirdness I can find bound, printed, and stuffed on a shelf.

And yes, I also collect Star Trek books of various flavors. A lot of them, really. I mean, it’s probably a diagnosable condition of some sort, but it keeps me off the streets.

Over the years, a particular book comes along that is so much fun or is just so well executed that I actually find myself feeling a teensy bit envious for not having written it. I don’t harbor any ill will toward such books or their authors, of course. Some of these people are friends, after all, and I celebrate their success and enjoy their creations, but every so often I learn about a certain title and just think, “Aw, man! Why didn’t I think of that?”

What are we talking about? Well, here’s a list of just some of the Star Trek books I wish I’d written:


Star Trek

Star Trek: The Original Topps Trading Card Series, by Paula M. Block & Terry J. Erdmann – As a child of the 1970s, I bought a ton of non-sports trading cards. Though I no longer have most of those cards, books like this are a fabulous way to revisit fondly remembered sets like the one Topps created in 1976 for The Original Series. I love the very idea behind books like this, which showcase entire card sets in fantastic high-res imagery, and Paula and Terry knock this one out of the park. Maybe they’ll let me do one for the Star Wars cards, or the sets for Planet of the Apes. Oh, wait.....


What Would Captain Kirk Do? Intergalactic Wisdom from the Captain of the U.S.S. Enterprise, by Brandon T. Snider – I’ve long championed the idea of more Star Trek books aimed at younger readers, whether we’re talking about fiction, activity books, character biographies or “Star Trek history,” and whatever other neat stuff we can come up with. Books like this are a fun way to introduce our favorite characters to a younger audience, so it’s probably a good idea that they didn’t let me do this one. Otherwise, they’d have gotten Captain Kirk’s Interstellar Seduction Manual, or something, and we kind of already have that one, anyway.


Star Trek

Make It So: Leadership Lessons from Star Trek: The Next Generation, by Wess Roberts and Bill Ross – I thought it was inspired to marry Captain Picard’s command style, experience and philosophy into an actual, workable guide to leadership. Better still was the idea of it being written by two gentlemen who each possess considerable business and management credentials. There are a lot of gimmicky books in this vein, but Roberts and Ross were able to create a legitimate, thoughtful and entertaining guide to growing into an effective leader.


Star Trek

Trek or Treat, by Terry Flanagan & Eleanor Ehrhardt – Decades before the internet would make memes and other funny pictures a bedrock component of our everyday online lives, there was this tome from 1977. Photos taken from TOS episodes get humorous captions, most of which are admittedly silly, but I DON’T CARE. This is an idea that demands revisiting and updating, by golly, and I’m your guy. So far as I’m concerned, this is the ONLY canon Star Trek book.


Star Trek

Star Trek Spaceflight Chronology, by Stan and Fred Goldstein with Rick Sternbach – Published at the time of Star Trek: The Motion Picture’s premiere, this was one of several books tying into the film’s release, and the one I absolutely had to have. Its mixture of log extracts, news reports and other anecdotes trace the beginnings of our real-world space program (as it was known in the late 1970s) and pushing forward into Star Trek’s imagined future. Rick Sternbach’s technical drawings and paintings provide magnificent views of a slew of spacecraft spanning centuries. Though its contents have largely been superceded by later films and television series, this remains one of my very favorite Star Trek “reference works.”


Star Trek

A Very Klingon Khristmas, by Paul Ruditis with Patrick Faricy – Look, it’s basically the Klingon version of The Night Before Christmas. What’s not to love? The text that so perfectly mimics the original poem’s structure is accompanied by truly wonderful illustrations from artist Patrick Faricy, including a couple that are laugh-out-loud funny. This book needs to be on shelves every holiday shopping season next to How the Grinch Stole Christmas, A Charlie Brown Christmas and The Polar Express. That’s right, I said it.


Star Trek

Captain Proton: Defender of the Earth, by Dean Wesley Smith – Captain Proton is one of my favorite things to come out of Star Trek: Voyager, and the idea of writing stories based around the character and his adventures is something I’ve been itching to do from the jump. This book of Captain Proton stories is presented in the style of the science fiction magazines of the 1940s and 1950s, and Dean Wesley Smith is totally on point as he channels several of those great pulp SF writers of yesteryear. I still want a new one of these every month.


Star Trek

The Starfleet Survival Guide, by David Mack – One of the best “inside the box” Star Trek reference books, this book is crammed with all sorts of ingenious improvisational procedures and tricks for Starfleet equipment like phasers and tricorders. Also included are guides to exotic or dangerous alien life forms and other tips for getting by if you find yourself marooned on an alien world. The premise is played completely straight, never breaking character while presenting itself as a book you’d expect to find in the footlocker of any eager Starfleet officer.


Star Trek

Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive, by David and Scott Tipton, with Rachel Stott and Charlie Kirchoff – Kirk and the Enterprise travel to another dimension and find themselves on an Earth of the far future... from the 1968 Planet of the Apes film. While it might be a comics miniseries instead of a novel or other book, it still goes on the list, by golly. Why? For one thing, Rachael Stott has become one of my favorite comic artists working today, particularly for her work on various Trek titles. Also, I’ve wanted to write a Star Trek/Apes crossover since I was 10 years old. Maybe I can cross these particular streams in novel form. Hmm...........


Star Trek

The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, Books I and II, by Greg Cox – Yes, it’s a twofer, but I’m going rogue. Though arguably not one of the best TOS episodes, “Assignment: Earth” and its premise of advanced humans working behind the scenes to protect humanity is something that’s always intrigued me, and I’ve always wanted to see more done with it. Friend Greg Cox scored a dream job when he set out to write these two novels, large portions of which unfold on Earth of the 1970s, 80s and 90s as Gary Seven and Roberta Lincoln hunt Khan in a bid to prevent him and his genetically superior brothers and sisters from taking over the world. Greg pulls off a master stroke here, and these two novels are definitely on my all-time favorite list.

All right, that’s 10, though the list could be a lot longer. What do you think? Something I should’ve listed, but didn’t? Or, maybe there’s a Star Trek book you wish you’d written?

---

Check out the "Ten for Ward" Backlist

Dayton Ward is the New York Times bestselling author or co-author of numerous novels and short stories, including a whole bunch of stuff set in the Star Trek universe, and often working with friend and co-writer Kevin Dilmore. He's also written (or co-written) for Star Trek Communicator, Star Trek Magazine, Syfy.com, and Tor.com. As he’s still a big ol' geek at heart, Dayton is known to wax nostalgic about all manner of Star Trek topics over on his own blog, The Fog of Ward. His latest Trek novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Headlong Flight, is available now via Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books as a mass market paperback, unabridged audio download and eBook priced at $7.99 (and $10.99 in Canada). Go to www.simonandschuster.com to purchase it.

]]>

So, here’s a bit of news: I write Star Trek books.

Specifically, I write Star Trek novels. I make the occasional detour toward other kinds of books, but novels are where I earn most of my bread and butter. I’m also a book collector. I love all kinds of books, from novels to books about history or film or the space program, to comics and graphic novels and whatever other bits of weirdness I can find bound, printed, and stuffed on a shelf.

And yes, I also collect Star Trek books of various flavors. A lot of them, really. I mean, it’s probably a diagnosable condition of some sort, but it keeps me off the streets.

Over the years, a particular book comes along that is so much fun or is just so well executed that I actually find myself feeling a teensy bit envious for not having written it. I don’t harbor any ill will toward such books or their authors, of course. Some of these people are friends, after all, and I celebrate their success and enjoy their creations, but every so often I learn about a certain title and just think, “Aw, man! Why didn’t I think of that?”

What are we talking about? Well, here’s a list of just some of the Star Trek books I wish I’d written:


Star Trek

Star Trek: The Original Topps Trading Card Series, by Paula M. Block & Terry J. Erdmann – As a child of the 1970s, I bought a ton of non-sports trading cards. Though I no longer have most of those cards, books like this are a fabulous way to revisit fondly remembered sets like the one Topps created in 1976 for The Original Series. I love the very idea behind books like this, which showcase entire card sets in fantastic high-res imagery, and Paula and Terry knock this one out of the park. Maybe they’ll let me do one for the Star Wars cards, or the sets for Planet of the Apes. Oh, wait.....


What Would Captain Kirk Do? Intergalactic Wisdom from the Captain of the U.S.S. Enterprise, by Brandon T. Snider – I’ve long championed the idea of more Star Trek books aimed at younger readers, whether we’re talking about fiction, activity books, character biographies or “Star Trek history,” and whatever other neat stuff we can come up with. Books like this are a fun way to introduce our favorite characters to a younger audience, so it’s probably a good idea that they didn’t let me do this one. Otherwise, they’d have gotten Captain Kirk’s Interstellar Seduction Manual, or something, and we kind of already have that one, anyway.


Star Trek

Make It So: Leadership Lessons from Star Trek: The Next Generation, by Wess Roberts and Bill Ross – I thought it was inspired to marry Captain Picard’s command style, experience and philosophy into an actual, workable guide to leadership. Better still was the idea of it being written by two gentlemen who each possess considerable business and management credentials. There are a lot of gimmicky books in this vein, but Roberts and Ross were able to create a legitimate, thoughtful and entertaining guide to growing into an effective leader.


Star Trek

Trek or Treat, by Terry Flanagan & Eleanor Ehrhardt – Decades before the internet would make memes and other funny pictures a bedrock component of our everyday online lives, there was this tome from 1977. Photos taken from TOS episodes get humorous captions, most of which are admittedly silly, but I DON’T CARE. This is an idea that demands revisiting and updating, by golly, and I’m your guy. So far as I’m concerned, this is the ONLY canon Star Trek book.


Star Trek

Star Trek Spaceflight Chronology, by Stan and Fred Goldstein with Rick Sternbach – Published at the time of Star Trek: The Motion Picture’s premiere, this was one of several books tying into the film’s release, and the one I absolutely had to have. Its mixture of log extracts, news reports and other anecdotes trace the beginnings of our real-world space program (as it was known in the late 1970s) and pushing forward into Star Trek’s imagined future. Rick Sternbach’s technical drawings and paintings provide magnificent views of a slew of spacecraft spanning centuries. Though its contents have largely been superceded by later films and television series, this remains one of my very favorite Star Trek “reference works.”


Star Trek

A Very Klingon Khristmas, by Paul Ruditis with Patrick Faricy – Look, it’s basically the Klingon version of The Night Before Christmas. What’s not to love? The text that so perfectly mimics the original poem’s structure is accompanied by truly wonderful illustrations from artist Patrick Faricy, including a couple that are laugh-out-loud funny. This book needs to be on shelves every holiday shopping season next to How the Grinch Stole Christmas, A Charlie Brown Christmas and The Polar Express. That’s right, I said it.


Star Trek

Captain Proton: Defender of the Earth, by Dean Wesley Smith – Captain Proton is one of my favorite things to come out of Star Trek: Voyager, and the idea of writing stories based around the character and his adventures is something I’ve been itching to do from the jump. This book of Captain Proton stories is presented in the style of the science fiction magazines of the 1940s and 1950s, and Dean Wesley Smith is totally on point as he channels several of those great pulp SF writers of yesteryear. I still want a new one of these every month.


Star Trek

The Starfleet Survival Guide, by David Mack – One of the best “inside the box” Star Trek reference books, this book is crammed with all sorts of ingenious improvisational procedures and tricks for Starfleet equipment like phasers and tricorders. Also included are guides to exotic or dangerous alien life forms and other tips for getting by if you find yourself marooned on an alien world. The premise is played completely straight, never breaking character while presenting itself as a book you’d expect to find in the footlocker of any eager Starfleet officer.


Star Trek

Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive, by David and Scott Tipton, with Rachel Stott and Charlie Kirchoff – Kirk and the Enterprise travel to another dimension and find themselves on an Earth of the far future... from the 1968 Planet of the Apes film. While it might be a comics miniseries instead of a novel or other book, it still goes on the list, by golly. Why? For one thing, Rachael Stott has become one of my favorite comic artists working today, particularly for her work on various Trek titles. Also, I’ve wanted to write a Star Trek/Apes crossover since I was 10 years old. Maybe I can cross these particular streams in novel form. Hmm...........


Star Trek

The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, Books I and II, by Greg Cox – Yes, it’s a twofer, but I’m going rogue. Though arguably not one of the best TOS episodes, “Assignment: Earth” and its premise of advanced humans working behind the scenes to protect humanity is something that’s always intrigued me, and I’ve always wanted to see more done with it. Friend Greg Cox scored a dream job when he set out to write these two novels, large portions of which unfold on Earth of the 1970s, 80s and 90s as Gary Seven and Roberta Lincoln hunt Khan in a bid to prevent him and his genetically superior brothers and sisters from taking over the world. Greg pulls off a master stroke here, and these two novels are definitely on my all-time favorite list.

All right, that’s 10, though the list could be a lot longer. What do you think? Something I should’ve listed, but didn’t? Or, maybe there’s a Star Trek book you wish you’d written?

---

Check out the "Ten for Ward" Backlist

Dayton Ward is the New York Times bestselling author or co-author of numerous novels and short stories, including a whole bunch of stuff set in the Star Trek universe, and often working with friend and co-writer Kevin Dilmore. He's also written (or co-written) for Star Trek Communicator, Star Trek Magazine, Syfy.com, and Tor.com. As he’s still a big ol' geek at heart, Dayton is known to wax nostalgic about all manner of Star Trek topics over on his own blog, The Fog of Ward. His latest Trek novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Headlong Flight, is available now via Simon & Schuster/Pocket Books as a mass market paperback, unabridged audio download and eBook priced at $7.99 (and $10.99 in Canada). Go to www.simonandschuster.com to purchase it.

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ten-for-ward-trek-books-i-wish-id-written Thu, 23 Feb 2017 06:38:37 -0800
<![CDATA[Bioship Alpha (Repaint) for Attack Wing Wave 29 ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/bioship-alpha-repaint-for-attack-wing-wave-29

Bioship Alpha has returned to deal with the increasing Borg threat.

This March, WizKids/NECA will release Star Trek: Attack Wing Wave 29 -- and StarTrek.com has the exclusive First Look at the ships in the upcoming expansion packs, continuing with the Bioship Alpha (Repaint).

The Bioship Alpha is a powerhouse of a ship that rivals even the mighty Borg. High primary weapon values combined with high agility, hull and shield values make Bioship Alpha the go to ship for the power gamer who doesn’t want to over think his fleet build. That being said, in the hands of a World Champion Class player, Bioship Alpha can be even more dangerous when piloted to perfection.

Star Trek

Inside the Bioship Alpha Expansion Pack you will find many powerful upgrade cards, including Biological Attack. At the end of the Activation Phase, if your ship base is touching an enemy base, you may discard this Upgrade and disable your Captain Card to inflict 1 critical damage to the enemy ship’s hull (even if it has Active Shields). Then disable 1 Crew Upgrade of your choice on the enemy ship. As mentioned previously, an expert pilot can finesse his way to victory with Bioship Alpha without having to rely only on the ship’s brute strength.

On the other hand, if raw firepower is what you seek, look no further than Energy Focusing Ship. Discard this card to perform this attack. Target all friendly ships within Range 1 of your ship that have not yet attacked this round. Target ships cannot make a normal attack this round. Instead, add +2 attack dice to your attack for each targeted ship. Place an Auxiliary Power Token beside your ship and each of the target ships. Starting at 6 attack dice you can see how including a few cheap ships in your fleet can turn into a devastating 10 die attack.   

Star Trek

Species 8472 uses quantum singularities to move their Bioships back and forth between the Delta Quadrant and their own realm in fluidic space. Quantum Singularity allows you to remove your ship from the play area and, during the next End Phase, place your ship back into the play area. A great positioning tool, this upgrade card also removes any tokens beside your ship when you jump (except Auxiliary Power Tokens). With all this power at your fingertips, is there anything that can stand in the way of victory?

Even if you already own the Bioship Alpha you are going to want to purchase the new repaint both for the dynamic new paint job as well as the tremendous power multiple Bioships bring to your fleet. Make sure to contact your friendly local game store to reserve your copy now.

Visit WizKids/NECA at WizKids.com/AttackWing for additional information about Star Trek: Attack Wing. And keep an eye on StarTrek.com for more First Looks and previews coming soon.

]]>

Bioship Alpha has returned to deal with the increasing Borg threat.

This March, WizKids/NECA will release Star Trek: Attack Wing Wave 29 -- and StarTrek.com has the exclusive First Look at the ships in the upcoming expansion packs, continuing with the Bioship Alpha (Repaint).

The Bioship Alpha is a powerhouse of a ship that rivals even the mighty Borg. High primary weapon values combined with high agility, hull and shield values make Bioship Alpha the go to ship for the power gamer who doesn’t want to over think his fleet build. That being said, in the hands of a World Champion Class player, Bioship Alpha can be even more dangerous when piloted to perfection.

Star Trek

Inside the Bioship Alpha Expansion Pack you will find many powerful upgrade cards, including Biological Attack. At the end of the Activation Phase, if your ship base is touching an enemy base, you may discard this Upgrade and disable your Captain Card to inflict 1 critical damage to the enemy ship’s hull (even if it has Active Shields). Then disable 1 Crew Upgrade of your choice on the enemy ship. As mentioned previously, an expert pilot can finesse his way to victory with Bioship Alpha without having to rely only on the ship’s brute strength.

On the other hand, if raw firepower is what you seek, look no further than Energy Focusing Ship. Discard this card to perform this attack. Target all friendly ships within Range 1 of your ship that have not yet attacked this round. Target ships cannot make a normal attack this round. Instead, add +2 attack dice to your attack for each targeted ship. Place an Auxiliary Power Token beside your ship and each of the target ships. Starting at 6 attack dice you can see how including a few cheap ships in your fleet can turn into a devastating 10 die attack.   

Star Trek

Species 8472 uses quantum singularities to move their Bioships back and forth between the Delta Quadrant and their own realm in fluidic space. Quantum Singularity allows you to remove your ship from the play area and, during the next End Phase, place your ship back into the play area. A great positioning tool, this upgrade card also removes any tokens beside your ship when you jump (except Auxiliary Power Tokens). With all this power at your fingertips, is there anything that can stand in the way of victory?

Even if you already own the Bioship Alpha you are going to want to purchase the new repaint both for the dynamic new paint job as well as the tremendous power multiple Bioships bring to your fleet. Make sure to contact your friendly local game store to reserve your copy now.

Visit WizKids/NECA at WizKids.com/AttackWing for additional information about Star Trek: Attack Wing. And keep an eye on StarTrek.com for more First Looks and previews coming soon.

]]>
bioship-alpha-repaint-for-attack-wing-wave-29 Wed, 22 Feb 2017 06:42:24 -0800
<![CDATA[Seven of Nine Things You Should Know About Jeri Ryan ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/seven-of-nine-things-you-should-know-about-jeri-ryan

Jeri Ryan, Star Trek: Voyager's Seven of Nine, celebrates her birthday today, February 22. And to mark the occasion, we at StarTrek.com are pleased to share Seven of Nine Things You Should Know About Jeri Ryan.

An Army Brat

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Jeri Lynn Zimmerman was born in Munich, Germany. She considered herself a true Army brat, as her father served overseas and she grew up at various military bases in America and Germany.

A Beauty Pageant Contestant

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Ryan attended college at Chicago's Northwestern University. To help cover costs while there, she entered a number of beauty pageants and even won a few. As Miss Illinois in 1990, she placed fourth in that year's Miss America pageant.

The Compelling Audition

Star Trek, Voyager, Jeri Ryan

The actress, who was aware of Star Trek, and particularly The Original Series, at first did not want the role of Seven of Nine. However, an audition scene -- one in which Seven recounted memories of laughing as a child, pre-assimilation by the Borg -- compelled her to push hard to win the part.

Behind the Scenes

Jeri Ryan and Brannon Braga

It's no secret that, during the show's run, she dated writer-producer Brannon Braga.

Her Favorite Episodes

Star Trek, Voyager, Someone to Watch Over Me, Jeri Ryan

"My favorite episodes were always the ones where Seven got to explore her humanity," Ryan told CNET.com last year. "I don't remember all of them, but one of them was 'Someone to Watch Over Me,' where Seven was learning how to date. The Doctor was teaching her. I thought that one was really sweet."


Returning to Seven of Nine

Star Trek, Star Trek Online's Delta Rising, Jeri Ryan

Ryan most recently portrayed Seven of Nine in 2014, when she provided the voice of her Voyager alter ego for Star Trek Online's Delta Rising.

The Cat Suit

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan, Body of Proof

StarTrek.com spoke to Ryan on the set of her then-new show Body of Proof in 2011, and asked the following question: Did you keep your Seven of Nine cat suit or burn the damn thing? Her reply: "They didn’t let me keep the cat suit. I would have loved to have burned it; not so much the cat suit as the corset that was under it. But, no, they didn’t let me have that. I do, however, have an alcove. I figured, 'That’s the least you can give me! Give me my alcove.' (Laughs). So I have it in my game room."


The Family

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan, Christope Eme

Ryan is married to Christophe Eme, a respected chef and restaurateur. Alex Ryan and Gisele Lynn Eme are Ryan's two children. She had Alex with her first husband, Jack Ryan, and Gisele with her second husband, Eme.


Staying Busy

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Ryan's most recent projects have included the family film Against the Wild II: Survive the Serengeti and the series Bosch. She's also set to reprise her recurring role as the formidable attorney Linda Rothman on the series Major Crimes. Her episode, "Quid Pro Quo," will air on March 8.

Please join StarTrek.com in wishing Ryan a happy birthday.

]]>

Jeri Ryan, Star Trek: Voyager's Seven of Nine, celebrates her birthday today, February 22. And to mark the occasion, we at StarTrek.com are pleased to share Seven of Nine Things You Should Know About Jeri Ryan.

An Army Brat

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Jeri Lynn Zimmerman was born in Munich, Germany. She considered herself a true Army brat, as her father served overseas and she grew up at various military bases in America and Germany.

A Beauty Pageant Contestant

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Ryan attended college at Chicago's Northwestern University. To help cover costs while there, she entered a number of beauty pageants and even won a few. As Miss Illinois in 1990, she placed fourth in that year's Miss America pageant.

The Compelling Audition

Star Trek, Voyager, Jeri Ryan

The actress, who was aware of Star Trek, and particularly The Original Series, at first did not want the role of Seven of Nine. However, an audition scene -- one in which Seven recounted memories of laughing as a child, pre-assimilation by the Borg -- compelled her to push hard to win the part.

Behind the Scenes

Jeri Ryan and Brannon Braga

It's no secret that, during the show's run, she dated writer-producer Brannon Braga.

Her Favorite Episodes

Star Trek, Voyager, Someone to Watch Over Me, Jeri Ryan

"My favorite episodes were always the ones where Seven got to explore her humanity," Ryan told CNET.com last year. "I don't remember all of them, but one of them was 'Someone to Watch Over Me,' where Seven was learning how to date. The Doctor was teaching her. I thought that one was really sweet."


Returning to Seven of Nine

Star Trek, Star Trek Online's Delta Rising, Jeri Ryan

Ryan most recently portrayed Seven of Nine in 2014, when she provided the voice of her Voyager alter ego for Star Trek Online's Delta Rising.

The Cat Suit

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan, Body of Proof

StarTrek.com spoke to Ryan on the set of her then-new show Body of Proof in 2011, and asked the following question: Did you keep your Seven of Nine cat suit or burn the damn thing? Her reply: "They didn’t let me keep the cat suit. I would have loved to have burned it; not so much the cat suit as the corset that was under it. But, no, they didn’t let me have that. I do, however, have an alcove. I figured, 'That’s the least you can give me! Give me my alcove.' (Laughs). So I have it in my game room."


The Family

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan, Christope Eme

Ryan is married to Christophe Eme, a respected chef and restaurateur. Alex Ryan and Gisele Lynn Eme are Ryan's two children. She had Alex with her first husband, Jack Ryan, and Gisele with her second husband, Eme.


Staying Busy

Star Trek, Jeri Ryan

Ryan's most recent projects have included the family film Against the Wild II: Survive the Serengeti and the series Bosch. She's also set to reprise her recurring role as the formidable attorney Linda Rothman on the series Major Crimes. Her episode, "Quid Pro Quo," will air on March 8.

Please join StarTrek.com in wishing Ryan a happy birthday.

]]>
seven-of-nine-things-you-should-know-about-jeri-ryan Wed, 22 Feb 2017 05:34:55 -0800
<![CDATA[Catching Up with 3-Time Trek Guest, Kurtwood Smith]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/catching-up-with-3-time-trek-guest-kurtwood-smith

If someone ever fields a character actor all-star team, Kurtwood Smith would be a star among stars. Whatever role he plays, the actor makes it his own, and he’s done so for four decades. Cases in point: the hiss-worthy Clarence Boddicker in RoboCop, the forever-grumpy Red Forman on That ‘70s Show, the authoritarian Mr. Perry in Dead Poets Society, the baffled, sympathetic Henry Langston on Resurrected, and the manipulative Vernon Masters on Agent Carter. And, on the Star Trek front, the versatile Smith played the unnamed, targeted-for-assassination Federation President in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country; Thrax, the Cardassian security officer, in the Deep Space Nine episode “Things Past,” and the Krenim temporal scientist Annorax in the Voyager two-parter, “Year of Hell.”

Smith’s latest project is Patriot, a drama that will drop Feb. 24 on Amazon. The show also features Michael Dorman, Trek guest star Terry O’Quinn, and Michael Chernus. Dorman stars as John Tavner, an intelligence officer working undercover at an industrial piping company, where he clashes on the regular with his boss, Mr. Claret, played by Smith. StarTrek.com caught up with Smith by phone last week for a wide-ranging interview in which he discussed his Trek appearances, Patriot and other upcoming projects. Here’s what he had to say…


Star Trek, Star Trek VI, Kurtwood Smith

Before you landed your role in Star Trek VI, how familiar were you with Star Trek in general?

I was familiar with The Original Series, of course, and somewhat familiar with the second series, The Next Generation, but primarily the first one. And I'd seen the previous films. I was a Star Trek fan. I wouldn't describe myself as a Trekkie, but I was definitely a fan of the genre, same with Star Wars. Nick Meyer, who directed Star Trek VI, I was in a film with him in 1990 that he directed, and after that film he said, "Hey, you want to do a Star Trek?" I said, "Yeah, sure." That's how that came about and I enjoyed doing it very much. Then that led to the TV series as well.


Star Trek, Star Trek VI, Kurtwood Smith

We'll talk about those in a moment, but before we do, let’s talk about the Fu Manchu look you had in Star Trek VI

I loved it. I loved the way he looked, let's put it that way. The time you have to spend getting into all that business, it's a little wearing, and the fact that you're never really comfortable when you're wearing all that much prosthetic stuff is problematic. If you lay down, you have to be very, very careful that you don't mess up the appliance on your forehead or the wig on your head. And I had contact lenses on that irritated my eyes all the time, and kind of made everything kind of blue. I felt like I was sick all day, like I was coming down with a cold. I was dealing with that, and I wasn't able to lay down, so I was kind of irritable. That's when you're off camera. On camera was much easier because then you had stuff to do and you were active, and you weren't thinking about all the petty little things that were irritating. But, even with that, it was a great group of people to be connected with, to be working with. I had a lot of fun. I was sitting next to Michael Dorn in the makeup room and chatting with Rene Auberjonois and some of the other actors in the movie, too.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

Years later you played Thrax on Deep Space Nine. Was that an audition or an offer?

That was an offer, yeah.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

Every actor we talk to says how much -- makeup horror stories aside -- they loved playing Cardassians, and your character had the distinction of being a character within a character…

He was a character within a character, and he was also a mirror of Rene's character from a different time. I loved the depth of it. I always liked the size of the characters on Star Trek. It reminds me of when I used to do a lot of Shakespeare, back when I was first coming up. It has that feel about it, you know, because you've got all this stuff on and you're dealing with enhanced language. They’re just very fun, complicated characters.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

If the makeup for Trek VI was a pain, your Cardassian must have been even doubly so...

Oh, worse, worse, because you had even less ability to lay down and rest.


Star Trek, That 70s Show, Kurtwood Smith

Plus, you were on TV schedule rather a more leisurely film schedule…

That’s right. It makes me sound like I'm lazy or something. I am a little lazy, but the fact that you have to be there at four in the morning to start putting that makeup on, and then after you get it on, then you've got to wait a little bit to go to work and then you have to wait in between scenes or something, in between setups. By the second day you work on this kind of a schedule, you're getting pretty tired, and when you can't lay down and rest, it messes with your head a bit. That's probably why the Cardassians are always cranky; I don't know.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

How did you enjoy catching up with Rene Auberjonois on that?

Oh, it was great. Rene's a great guy. I'm very familiar with him, ever since I started doing theater up in the Bay Area. I’d never worked with him then, but I would go and see him in shows at ACT, American Conservatory Theater. He was one of the lead actors there, and he's a wonderful actor, and so it was always a pleasure to work with him. We have many mutual friends, and there's a theater I belong to that Rene's daughter and son-in-law work at as well. Plus, we just cross paths here and there. We used to cross paths at auditions, too, but now I don't think either one of us audition much. We pretty much get straight offers.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

Let’s move on to Voyager. We loved your character, this guy trying to restore the Krenim Imperium to power. What interested you most about him, because he was very 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea-esque?

I was fascinated by the question, the Sophie's Choice that he's placed himself in, where, in order to try to get his life back, he's endangering so many other people, so many other lives and so many other worlds. How deep is that relationship to a single person in your life? There’s quite an ego involved to think, “My love is more important than this world or that world or this time.” Yet, that love was real and genuine, so there's something attractive about that as well.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

How'd you enjoy working with Kate Mulgrew, Robert Duncan McNeill and the rest of the Voyager cast you interacted with on and off-camera?

I loved working with Robbie. He was a lot of fun. Kate I hardly saw. I met her quickly once. Our scene was filmed separately because we were talking to each other over a transmitter, and they didn't call me in to shoot opposite her when she recorded. And when I recorded, her side of it was already done. So, I just played off the transmission. That's too bad, because I've always been a big fan of her work and I think she's doing such great stuff on Orange is the New Black. She's always done such great stage work as well.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

Star Trek just celebrated its 50th anniversary. What does it mean to you, via your visits to the Trek universe, to be a part of the phenomenon?

It means a lot. I enjoyed having been part of a few phenomena. I was connected with the Rambo series as well, and always got a kick out of that. Star Trek even more, because there are so many more films and shows that it's produced, and it is a world unto itself. I enjoy it very much. Some very good friends of mine, Jeff Combs and Armin Shimerman, are part of the Trek world far more so than I am. You know what it's like? It's like having been in a theater group, having been part of a repertory company or a Shakespeare festival that runs for a long time, and when you go back and you see people or when you connect separately from that, there's always a bond because of that. It’s a very special tie.

Star Trek, RoboCop, Kurtwood Smith

You've been acting for roughly 40 years. What do you know about acting now that you wish you knew when you were starting out?

I guess maybe that you shouldn't work so hard at it. I think that the older and more used to it you are, the more relaxed you are and the better your work is.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

Your latest project is Patriot, for Amazon. What was it like to do a pilot and then wait to see if it went to series based on viewers giving it thumbs up or thumbs down?

It is crazy, but by the same token, I also have a feeling that Amazon is more willing to give things a chance than networks might with simple ratings. Also, the show, by the pilot being aired, people got to see it instead of network executives who may or may not care for that genre or have something against the people connected with the show. I feel there’s a better chance for your show going to series when the public views it. I also think it's a great thing as a viewer to be able to look at different pilots that are out there.

Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

Introduce readers to the world of Patriot for those who have not seen the pilot...

Patriot is ... I guess you'd call it a political thriller, but it's full of suspense, it's got a lot of action, and yet it's very unique and darkly comic. It follows a young intelligence agent whose current assignment is to try to prevent Iran from going nuclear by getting money into the country to influence an election. The way that they want to do this is by getting hooked up with a corporation that also does business in a mutual country, in this case Luxembourg. I think that in the world of the show, anyway, that is the only country that is mutual, that does business with both countries. They place him in a piping company.

Now, it's important that the piping company know nothing about his work, but this is where I come in, because I am his boss at this piping company, and I don't know he's doing espionage work. I assume he's just there as a young executive in this company, and it turns out, of course, that he knows nothing about piping. So, he is a constant pain in my ass and, likewise, I am constantly an obstruction to him because I'm causing him problems. 


Star Trek, Kurtwood Smith, Patriot

What kind of a fellow is your character, Mr. Claret?

He expects this young man to be working in conjunction with him, and he's not very good at his job. Now, Leslie Claret is a hard-ass, and he's funny, too. He's very dedicated to what he does. We find out in the early episodes that he’s a legend in the piping world and ran his own company, but due to circumstances that I won't get into because it's more fun to discover it, he had a great fall from grace and ended up at this other company as the head of a division, instead of running companies, which is what he should be doing. Anyway, he spends a good deal of time infuriating this guy and being infuriated by this guy, but he’s not just mean on purpose. It all has to do with the circumstances. It’s funny. It seems that I've spent a good deal of my career berating young men, which has become my stock and trade. But with Claret, once you find out his back story, you’ll have a good deal of sympathy for him as well.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

How did you enjoy working with Michael and Terry and the rest of this cast?

I loved working with Michael. He's a wonderful guy and a very talented actor. Terry O'Quinn, I've known for years, but not well. We were in a movie together, but we really haven't had scenes together. Doing Patriot, it didn't seem we were going to have much to do, either. Then, in the last two episodes of the season, we had a number of really good scenes together. He plays the head of the intelligence agency, and the father of the intelligence agent, so there's a whole other dynamic going on there that's quite fascinating.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

When will you know about a second season for Patriot?

By April 1st, hopefully even sooner. The show drops on February 24th, so by a couple weeks after that. It’s nice not to have to wait very long.

 

IMDB lists as upcoming projects Amityville Awakening and Business Ethics. Please tell us a bit about each of those…

Amityville Horror, well, I don't know what the deal is with that movie. We shot it three years ago, and they keep saying, “It's going to come out, it's going to come out,” and “Now it's going to come out.” Then it’s “Oh, no, it's going to come out later” and then, “No, no, no, a little later.” So, I don't know, but it is in the Amityville line of films. It's not a remake. It's a new film that takes place in the house, and the new family that has moved in there. One of the children is in a coma and then becomes possessed by spirits from the house. I'm a doctor who comes and tries to help the situation. Jennifer Jason Leigh plays the mother. She's wonderful.

Business Ethics is a film I did this past fall with a young Canadian filmmaker. It's a feature-length version of a short he had done that one of the actor/producers from Patriot, Gil Bellows, was in. He suggested me for a role. It's a very fun comedy take on the business world. It's a little bit more of a quirky, dark comedy. I play a billionaire in that.

]]>

If someone ever fields a character actor all-star team, Kurtwood Smith would be a star among stars. Whatever role he plays, the actor makes it his own, and he’s done so for four decades. Cases in point: the hiss-worthy Clarence Boddicker in RoboCop, the forever-grumpy Red Forman on That ‘70s Show, the authoritarian Mr. Perry in Dead Poets Society, the baffled, sympathetic Henry Langston on Resurrected, and the manipulative Vernon Masters on Agent Carter. And, on the Star Trek front, the versatile Smith played the unnamed, targeted-for-assassination Federation President in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country; Thrax, the Cardassian security officer, in the Deep Space Nine episode “Things Past,” and the Krenim temporal scientist Annorax in the Voyager two-parter, “Year of Hell.”

Smith’s latest project is Patriot, a drama that will drop Feb. 24 on Amazon. The show also features Michael Dorman, Trek guest star Terry O’Quinn, and Michael Chernus. Dorman stars as John Tavner, an intelligence officer working undercover at an industrial piping company, where he clashes on the regular with his boss, Mr. Claret, played by Smith. StarTrek.com caught up with Smith by phone last week for a wide-ranging interview in which he discussed his Trek appearances, Patriot and other upcoming projects. Here’s what he had to say…


Star Trek, Star Trek VI, Kurtwood Smith

Before you landed your role in Star Trek VI, how familiar were you with Star Trek in general?

I was familiar with The Original Series, of course, and somewhat familiar with the second series, The Next Generation, but primarily the first one. And I'd seen the previous films. I was a Star Trek fan. I wouldn't describe myself as a Trekkie, but I was definitely a fan of the genre, same with Star Wars. Nick Meyer, who directed Star Trek VI, I was in a film with him in 1990 that he directed, and after that film he said, "Hey, you want to do a Star Trek?" I said, "Yeah, sure." That's how that came about and I enjoyed doing it very much. Then that led to the TV series as well.


Star Trek, Star Trek VI, Kurtwood Smith

We'll talk about those in a moment, but before we do, let’s talk about the Fu Manchu look you had in Star Trek VI

I loved it. I loved the way he looked, let's put it that way. The time you have to spend getting into all that business, it's a little wearing, and the fact that you're never really comfortable when you're wearing all that much prosthetic stuff is problematic. If you lay down, you have to be very, very careful that you don't mess up the appliance on your forehead or the wig on your head. And I had contact lenses on that irritated my eyes all the time, and kind of made everything kind of blue. I felt like I was sick all day, like I was coming down with a cold. I was dealing with that, and I wasn't able to lay down, so I was kind of irritable. That's when you're off camera. On camera was much easier because then you had stuff to do and you were active, and you weren't thinking about all the petty little things that were irritating. But, even with that, it was a great group of people to be connected with, to be working with. I had a lot of fun. I was sitting next to Michael Dorn in the makeup room and chatting with Rene Auberjonois and some of the other actors in the movie, too.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

Years later you played Thrax on Deep Space Nine. Was that an audition or an offer?

That was an offer, yeah.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

Every actor we talk to says how much -- makeup horror stories aside -- they loved playing Cardassians, and your character had the distinction of being a character within a character…

He was a character within a character, and he was also a mirror of Rene's character from a different time. I loved the depth of it. I always liked the size of the characters on Star Trek. It reminds me of when I used to do a lot of Shakespeare, back when I was first coming up. It has that feel about it, you know, because you've got all this stuff on and you're dealing with enhanced language. They’re just very fun, complicated characters.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine, Kurtwood Smith

If the makeup for Trek VI was a pain, your Cardassian must have been even doubly so...

Oh, worse, worse, because you had even less ability to lay down and rest.


Star Trek, That 70s Show, Kurtwood Smith

Plus, you were on TV schedule rather a more leisurely film schedule…

That’s right. It makes me sound like I'm lazy or something. I am a little lazy, but the fact that you have to be there at four in the morning to start putting that makeup on, and then after you get it on, then you've got to wait a little bit to go to work and then you have to wait in between scenes or something, in between setups. By the second day you work on this kind of a schedule, you're getting pretty tired, and when you can't lay down and rest, it messes with your head a bit. That's probably why the Cardassians are always cranky; I don't know.


Star Trek, Deep Space Nine

How did you enjoy catching up with Rene Auberjonois on that?

Oh, it was great. Rene's a great guy. I'm very familiar with him, ever since I started doing theater up in the Bay Area. I’d never worked with him then, but I would go and see him in shows at ACT, American Conservatory Theater. He was one of the lead actors there, and he's a wonderful actor, and so it was always a pleasure to work with him. We have many mutual friends, and there's a theater I belong to that Rene's daughter and son-in-law work at as well. Plus, we just cross paths here and there. We used to cross paths at auditions, too, but now I don't think either one of us audition much. We pretty much get straight offers.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

Let’s move on to Voyager. We loved your character, this guy trying to restore the Krenim Imperium to power. What interested you most about him, because he was very 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea-esque?

I was fascinated by the question, the Sophie's Choice that he's placed himself in, where, in order to try to get his life back, he's endangering so many other people, so many other lives and so many other worlds. How deep is that relationship to a single person in your life? There’s quite an ego involved to think, “My love is more important than this world or that world or this time.” Yet, that love was real and genuine, so there's something attractive about that as well.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

How'd you enjoy working with Kate Mulgrew, Robert Duncan McNeill and the rest of the Voyager cast you interacted with on and off-camera?

I loved working with Robbie. He was a lot of fun. Kate I hardly saw. I met her quickly once. Our scene was filmed separately because we were talking to each other over a transmitter, and they didn't call me in to shoot opposite her when she recorded. And when I recorded, her side of it was already done. So, I just played off the transmission. That's too bad, because I've always been a big fan of her work and I think she's doing such great stuff on Orange is the New Black. She's always done such great stage work as well.


Star Trek, Voyager, Kurtwood Smith

Star Trek just celebrated its 50th anniversary. What does it mean to you, via your visits to the Trek universe, to be a part of the phenomenon?

It means a lot. I enjoyed having been part of a few phenomena. I was connected with the Rambo series as well, and always got a kick out of that. Star Trek even more, because there are so many more films and shows that it's produced, and it is a world unto itself. I enjoy it very much. Some very good friends of mine, Jeff Combs and Armin Shimerman, are part of the Trek world far more so than I am. You know what it's like? It's like having been in a theater group, having been part of a repertory company or a Shakespeare festival that runs for a long time, and when you go back and you see people or when you connect separately from that, there's always a bond because of that. It’s a very special tie.

Star Trek, RoboCop, Kurtwood Smith

You've been acting for roughly 40 years. What do you know about acting now that you wish you knew when you were starting out?

I guess maybe that you shouldn't work so hard at it. I think that the older and more used to it you are, the more relaxed you are and the better your work is.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

Your latest project is Patriot, for Amazon. What was it like to do a pilot and then wait to see if it went to series based on viewers giving it thumbs up or thumbs down?

It is crazy, but by the same token, I also have a feeling that Amazon is more willing to give things a chance than networks might with simple ratings. Also, the show, by the pilot being aired, people got to see it instead of network executives who may or may not care for that genre or have something against the people connected with the show. I feel there’s a better chance for your show going to series when the public views it. I also think it's a great thing as a viewer to be able to look at different pilots that are out there.

Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

Introduce readers to the world of Patriot for those who have not seen the pilot...

Patriot is ... I guess you'd call it a political thriller, but it's full of suspense, it's got a lot of action, and yet it's very unique and darkly comic. It follows a young intelligence agent whose current assignment is to try to prevent Iran from going nuclear by getting money into the country to influence an election. The way that they want to do this is by getting hooked up with a corporation that also does business in a mutual country, in this case Luxembourg. I think that in the world of the show, anyway, that is the only country that is mutual, that does business with both countries. They place him in a piping company.

Now, it's important that the piping company know nothing about his work, but this is where I come in, because I am his boss at this piping company, and I don't know he's doing espionage work. I assume he's just there as a young executive in this company, and it turns out, of course, that he knows nothing about piping. So, he is a constant pain in my ass and, likewise, I am constantly an obstruction to him because I'm causing him problems. 


Star Trek, Kurtwood Smith, Patriot

What kind of a fellow is your character, Mr. Claret?

He expects this young man to be working in conjunction with him, and he's not very good at his job. Now, Leslie Claret is a hard-ass, and he's funny, too. He's very dedicated to what he does. We find out in the early episodes that he’s a legend in the piping world and ran his own company, but due to circumstances that I won't get into because it's more fun to discover it, he had a great fall from grace and ended up at this other company as the head of a division, instead of running companies, which is what he should be doing. Anyway, he spends a good deal of time infuriating this guy and being infuriated by this guy, but he’s not just mean on purpose. It all has to do with the circumstances. It’s funny. It seems that I've spent a good deal of my career berating young men, which has become my stock and trade. But with Claret, once you find out his back story, you’ll have a good deal of sympathy for him as well.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

How did you enjoy working with Michael and Terry and the rest of this cast?

I loved working with Michael. He's a wonderful guy and a very talented actor. Terry O'Quinn, I've known for years, but not well. We were in a movie together, but we really haven't had scenes together. Doing Patriot, it didn't seem we were going to have much to do, either. Then, in the last two episodes of the season, we had a number of really good scenes together. He plays the head of the intelligence agency, and the father of the intelligence agent, so there's a whole other dynamic going on there that's quite fascinating.


Star Trek, Patriot, Kurtwood Smith

When will you know about a second season for Patriot?

By April 1st, hopefully even sooner. The show drops on February 24th, so by a couple weeks after that. It’s nice not to have to wait very long.

 

IMDB lists as upcoming projects Amityville Awakening and Business Ethics. Please tell us a bit about each of those…

Amityville Horror, well, I don't know what the deal is with that movie. We shot it three years ago, and they keep saying, “It's going to come out, it's going to come out,” and “Now it's going to come out.” Then it’s “Oh, no, it's going to come out later” and then, “No, no, no, a little later.” So, I don't know, but it is in the Amityville line of films. It's not a remake. It's a new film that takes place in the house, and the new family that has moved in there. One of the children is in a coma and then becomes possessed by spirits from the house. I'm a doctor who comes and tries to help the situation. Jennifer Jason Leigh plays the mother. She's wonderful.

Business Ethics is a film I did this past fall with a young Canadian filmmaker. It's a feature-length version of a short he had done that one of the actor/producers from Patriot, Gil Bellows, was in. He suggested me for a role. It's a very fun comedy take on the business world. It's a little bit more of a quirky, dark comedy. I play a billionaire in that.

]]>
catching-up-with-3-time-trek-guest-kurtwood-smith Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:05:21 -0800
<![CDATA[Jaylah, Sinestro & Mirror Picard Set for May]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/jaylah-sinestro-mirror-picard-set-for-may

There's still plenty of snow on the ground all over the U.S. right now, but IDW Publishing is thinking warm spring thoughts, as they've just announced their Star Trek comic book titles for May. StarTrek.com is pleased to share details about those books, as well as exclusive First Looks at their covers.

 

Star Trek

First up is Star Trek: Boldly Go #8, written by Mike Johnson, with art by Megan Levens and a cover by George Caltsoudas. In the finale of the epic storyline, it's up to Kirk, Spock and the Academy cadets, including their newest member, Jaylah, to solve the murder of the Romulan ambassador before the Babel peace conference ends in disaster and a new course is set for galactic war. Boldly Go #8 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. Fans should be on the hunt for a Subscription Variant with a Vincenzo Federici cover; and a Funko Art Variant with a Tim Gilardi cover; and a Variant cover by Cryssy Cheung.

 

Star Trek

Next, there's Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol 2 #6 (of 6), written by Mike Johnson, with Angel Hernandez doing double duty on the art and cover. The conclusion to the blockbuster event of 2017 answers the question... Will it be a new dawn for the Green Lantern Corps in the Star Trek universe... or will Sinestro and Khan succeed in conquering the new timeline for themselves? Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol 2 #6 (of 6) will span 32 pages and cost $3.99. The Subscription Variant features a George Caltsoudas cover, while the Variant cover is by Elizabeth Beals.

 

Star Trek

Simon Roy and Cavan Scott wrote Star Trek: Waypoint #5 (of 6), which features art by Simon Roy and Josh Hood, as well as a cover by Roy. Star Trek: Waypoint continues its celebration of Star Trek with two new tales. Roy (Prophet) takes on the Prime Directive in an Original Series story, while writer Cavan Scott (Dr. Who, Sherlock Holmes) and artist Josh Hood (Star Trek: Deviations, We Can Never Go Home) focus on Doctor Bashir in a thought-provoking Deep Space Nine tale. Star Trek: Waypoint #5 (of 6) will play out across 32 pages and be priced at $3.99. The Subscription Cover is by Tony Shasteen.

 

Star Trek

And, last but not least, on the way is Star Trek: TNG: Mirror Broken #1 (of 6), written by Scott Tipton & David Tipton, with J.K. Woodward handling the art and cover. In it, Captain Jean-Luc Picard will stop at nothing to get his hands on the Empire's newest warship, the ISS Enterprise, be it lies, deception... or murder. With enemies and allies around every corner, Picard's quest to help the Enterprise and restore the Empire to glory will not be an easy one. Good thing he has a crew on board who will also stop at nothing to ensure total victory — at any cost. This title will be 32 pages long and cost $3.99. George Caltsoudas has rendered the cover for the Subscription Variant, while other Variant covers are by Joe Corroney and Adam Rosenlund.

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>

There's still plenty of snow on the ground all over the U.S. right now, but IDW Publishing is thinking warm spring thoughts, as they've just announced their Star Trek comic book titles for May. StarTrek.com is pleased to share details about those books, as well as exclusive First Looks at their covers.

 

Star Trek

First up is Star Trek: Boldly Go #8, written by Mike Johnson, with art by Megan Levens and a cover by George Caltsoudas. In the finale of the epic storyline, it's up to Kirk, Spock and the Academy cadets, including their newest member, Jaylah, to solve the murder of the Romulan ambassador before the Babel peace conference ends in disaster and a new course is set for galactic war. Boldly Go #8 will run 32 pages and cost $3.99. Fans should be on the hunt for a Subscription Variant with a Vincenzo Federici cover; and a Funko Art Variant with a Tim Gilardi cover; and a Variant cover by Cryssy Cheung.

 

Star Trek

Next, there's Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol 2 #6 (of 6), written by Mike Johnson, with Angel Hernandez doing double duty on the art and cover. The conclusion to the blockbuster event of 2017 answers the question... Will it be a new dawn for the Green Lantern Corps in the Star Trek universe... or will Sinestro and Khan succeed in conquering the new timeline for themselves? Star Trek/Green Lantern Vol 2 #6 (of 6) will span 32 pages and cost $3.99. The Subscription Variant features a George Caltsoudas cover, while the Variant cover is by Elizabeth Beals.

 

Star Trek

Simon Roy and Cavan Scott wrote Star Trek: Waypoint #5 (of 6), which features art by Simon Roy and Josh Hood, as well as a cover by Roy. Star Trek: Waypoint continues its celebration of Star Trek with two new tales. Roy (Prophet) takes on the Prime Directive in an Original Series story, while writer Cavan Scott (Dr. Who, Sherlock Holmes) and artist Josh Hood (Star Trek: Deviations, We Can Never Go Home) focus on Doctor Bashir in a thought-provoking Deep Space Nine tale. Star Trek: Waypoint #5 (of 6) will play out across 32 pages and be priced at $3.99. The Subscription Cover is by Tony Shasteen.

 

Star Trek

And, last but not least, on the way is Star Trek: TNG: Mirror Broken #1 (of 6), written by Scott Tipton & David Tipton, with J.K. Woodward handling the art and cover. In it, Captain Jean-Luc Picard will stop at nothing to get his hands on the Empire's newest warship, the ISS Enterprise, be it lies, deception... or murder. With enemies and allies around every corner, Picard's quest to help the Enterprise and restore the Empire to glory will not be an easy one. Good thing he has a crew on board who will also stop at nothing to ensure total victory — at any cost. This title will be 32 pages long and cost $3.99. George Caltsoudas has rendered the cover for the Subscription Variant, while other Variant covers are by Joe Corroney and Adam Rosenlund.

For additional details, contact your local comic book retailer or visit www.comicshoplocator.com to find a store near you. Keep an eye on StarTrek.com for additional details about the IDW's upcoming Star Trek adventures, as well as exclusive First Looks at covers and preview pages.

]]>
jaylah-sinestro-mirror-picard-set-for-may Tue, 21 Feb 2017 07:35:54 -0800
<![CDATA[Beware the Walking Red -- Zombie Cosplay]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/beware-the-walking-red-zombie-cosplay

For fans of Star Trek: The Original Series, the running joke is that if Kirk, Spock and McCoy beam down to a strange, new world along with a Security officer, it's the poor sap in the red uniform who won't be coming back to the Enterprise in one piece. Because of this, the term "Redshirt" has come to mean someone who is expendable.

Star Trek

Playing on this trope, some friends of mine, Damien Oberlin Siegel and Anthony Kwan, organized a "Redshirt Zombie" cosplay day -- as if all the Redshirts who were killed in all the TOS episodes had returned as zombies -- at the Las Vegas Star Trek convention several years ago. Months before the convention, we spread the word through social media amongst other friends we knew would be attending as well, and Damien used her choreography skills to shoot a short demo video of herself performing the dance from Michael Jackson's "Thriller" so that we could watch it, learn it and do it together as a flash mob to dance as Redshirt Zombies.

Star Trek

The event was very successful and we had a lot of fun shambling through the hallways and dealers room, posing for photos throughout the day. We have repeated the Redshirt Zombie flash mob several times since, most recently last year at the 50th Anniversary convention in Las Vegas. As with my Borg costume, I have made upgrades and revisions to my Redshirt Zombie cosplay over the past couple of years, but what follows is a step by step outline for my original process.

Star Trek

I started with a redshirt uniform that I found at a thrift store. Many thrift stores will start to put out their Halloween costumes in late August, so I visit frequently and keep my eye out for new stock. I added a sew-on patch over the silk-screened delta division insignia, for greater accuracy. Since I found the uniform for just a few dollars, I didn't feel bad about strategically adding rips and tears to it in the chest, along the arms, and up the back.

Star Trek

With the tears in the uniform complete, next I took a plain black t-shirt and used fishing line, for durability, to sew on foam and rubber zombie costume parts (also from a thrift store and from an after-Halloween sale) like exposed ribs, intestines, and exposed spinal column. That way, I could don the black t-shirt with the attached Zombie parts, and then I could put on the uniform over the black shirt to create a more realistic 3-D effect. I found some elbow-length zombie gloves that I could slide underneath the ripped sleeves of the uniform.

Star Trek

For the trousers, I tracked down black polyester slacks at a thrift store, and did a bit of hand sewing to duplicate the high cuffs from the look of TOS. I used additional rubber zombie parts like exposed bones and wounds to create a zombified look on the legs. I altered black boots from a thrift store, and on the right foot, I attached rubber skeleton toes, and used spare leather scraps attached to the top of the toes to make it appear that the boot was ripped open and the skeleton toes were exposed. I kept the left boot as it was, for a lack of symmetry to elicit an unnerving feeling from passers-by.

Star Trek

I realized that I COULD use makeup for the face, but I wanted to find a solution where I wouldn't need to spend a lot of time applying makeup, only to have to remove it later for another cosplay, so I opted for a three-part mask solution-- a headpiece, a mouthpiece and goggles to hide the division between the head and mouth. I located a "Hector Hammond" (the villain from the Green Lantern film) headpiece online for just a few dollars, and it looked wounded like a zombie. The forehead was bloated and elongated, and it reminded me of one of the alien bridge crew members from Star Trek: The Motion Picture, so in my mind for my cosplay, I was a zombified member of that particular alien race.

Star Trek, The Original Series

I unearthed a zombie mouth/nosepiece that wrapped around my own face and slipped over my ears to secure it at an after-Halloween sale, and goggles similar to goggles used in a few TOS episodes. In one of the eyes of the goggles, I cut a hole and wedged in a rubber fake eye, so it appears as if one eye is about to fall out of the goggles. It takes just a few seconds to put on the headpiece, then the mouthpiece and the then the goggles, and I can remove them quickly to eat or drink, and it saves me time at a convention if I want to wear another cosplay later in the day -- I have no makeup to remove, so I can go straight to an Andorian, or to Mr. Data, or to a Borg.

Star Trek

My two oldest kids wanted to join me the 50th Anniversary Zombie Flash Mob last year, so they wore their TOS uniforms with some makeup and uncombed hair to capture the zombie aesthetic. Most recently, I've tweaked my Redshirt Zombie with newer, more realistic-looking zombie gloves, and I've experimented with an exposed teeth facial appliance, makeup, a wig, and the yellow contact lenses I use for Mr. Data and Lore.

Star Trek

If you are interested in becoming a Redshirt Zombie, there is a Facebook group with almost 200 members. You can ask questions, share Cosplay and makeup tips and learn about get-togethers and flash mob events at the Las Vegas, and other conventions. Go to www.facebook.com/groups/459425327414454/?ref=ts&fref=ts

So, DON'T beam down with Kirk, Spock and McCoy. But if you do, be sure to watch your back -- and fear the Walking Red!


Eric Allan Hall has been costuming since 1987. A lifelong Star Trek fan, he's  been featured in his Borg costume in the documentaries Trek Nation, by Rod Roddenberry, and in William Shatner’s Get A Life. Transplanted to Utah from the Seattle area in 2001, Eric has attended about 80 conventions since he first started cosplaying – often with his family.

]]>

For fans of Star Trek: The Original Series, the running joke is that if Kirk, Spock and McCoy beam down to a strange, new world along with a Security officer, it's the poor sap in the red uniform who won't be coming back to the Enterprise in one piece. Because of this, the term "Redshirt" has come to mean someone who is expendable.

Star Trek

Playing on this trope, some friends of mine, Damien Oberlin Siegel and Anthony Kwan, organized a "Redshirt Zombie" cosplay day -- as if all the Redshirts who were killed in all the TOS episodes had returned as zombies -- at the Las Vegas Star Trek convention several years ago. Months before the convention, we spread the word through social media amongst other friends we knew would be attending as well, and Damien used her choreography skills to shoot a short demo video of herself performing the dance from Michael Jackson's "Thriller" so that we could watch it, learn it and do it together as a flash mob to dance as Redshirt Zombies.

Star Trek

The event was very successful and we had a lot of fun shambling through the hallways and dealers room, posing for photos throughout the day. We have repeated the Redshirt Zombie flash mob several times since, most recently last year at the 50th Anniversary convention in Las Vegas. As with my Borg costume, I have made upgrades and revisions to my Redshirt Zombie cosplay over the past couple of years, but what follows is a step by step outline for my original process.

Star Trek

I started with a redshirt uniform that I found at a thrift store. Many thrift stores will start to put out their Halloween costumes in late August, so I visit frequently and keep my eye out for new stock. I added a sew-on patch over the silk-screened delta division insignia, for greater accuracy. Since I found the uniform for just a few dollars, I didn't feel bad about strategically adding rips and tears to it in the chest, along the arms, and up the back.

Star Trek

With the tears in the uniform complete, next I took a plain black t-shirt and used fishing line, for durability, to sew on foam and rubber zombie costume parts (also from a thrift store and from an after-Halloween sale) like exposed ribs, intestines, and exposed spinal column. That way, I could don the black t-shirt with the attached Zombie parts, and then I could put on the uniform over the black shirt to create a more realistic 3-D effect. I found some elbow-length zombie gloves that I could slide underneath the ripped sleeves of the uniform.

Star Trek

For the trousers, I tracked down black polyester slacks at a thrift store, and did a bit of hand sewing to duplicate the high cuffs from the look of TOS. I used additional rubber zombie parts like exposed bones and wounds to create a zombified look on the legs. I altered black boots from a thrift store, and on the right foot, I attached rubber skeleton toes, and used spare leather scraps attached to the top of the toes to make it appear that the boot was ripped open and the skeleton toes were exposed. I kept the left boot as it was, for a lack of symmetry to elicit an unnerving feeling from passers-by.

Star Trek

I realized that I COULD use makeup for the face, but I wanted to find a solution where I wouldn't need to spend a lot of time applying makeup, only to have to remove it later for another cosplay, so I opted for a three-part mask solution-- a headpiece, a mouthpiece and goggles to hide the division between the head and mouth. I located a "Hector Hammond" (the villain from the Green Lantern film) headpiece online for just a few dollars, and it looked wounded like a zombie. The forehead was bloated and elongated, and it reminded me of one of the alien bridge crew members from Star Trek: The Motion Picture, so in my mind for my cosplay, I was a zombified member of that particular alien race.

Star Trek, The Original Series

I unearthed a zombie mouth/nosepiece that wrapped around my own face and slipped over my ears to secure it at an after-Halloween sale, and goggles similar to goggles used in a few TOS episodes. In one of the eyes of the goggles, I cut a hole and wedged in a rubber fake eye, so it appears as if one eye is about to fall out of the goggles. It takes just a few seconds to put on the headpiece, then the mouthpiece and the then the goggles, and I can remove them quickly to eat or drink, and it saves me time at a convention if I want to wear another cosplay later in the day -- I have no makeup to remove, so I can go straight to an Andorian, or to Mr. Data, or to a Borg.

Star Trek

My two oldest kids wanted to join me the 50th Anniversary Zombie Flash Mob last year, so they wore their TOS uniforms with some makeup and uncombed hair to capture the zombie aesthetic. Most recently, I've tweaked my Redshirt Zombie with newer, more realistic-looking zombie gloves, and I've experimented with an exposed teeth facial appliance, makeup, a wig, and the yellow contact lenses I use for Mr. Data and Lore.

Star Trek

If you are interested in becoming a Redshirt Zombie, there is a Facebook group with almost 200 members. You can ask questions, share Cosplay and makeup tips and learn about get-togethers and flash mob events at the Las Vegas, and other conventions. Go to www.facebook.com/groups/459425327414454/?ref=ts&fref=ts

So, DON'T beam down with Kirk, Spock and McCoy. But if you do, be sure to watch your back -- and fear the Walking Red!


Eric Allan Hall has been costuming since 1987. A lifelong Star Trek fan, he's  been featured in his Borg costume in the documentaries Trek Nation, by Rod Roddenberry, and in William Shatner’s Get A Life. Transplanted to Utah from the Seattle area in 2001, Eric has attended about 80 conventions since he first started cosplaying – often with his family.

]]>
beware-the-walking-red-zombie-cosplay Mon, 20 Feb 2017 06:58:54 -0800
<![CDATA[Love Your Pet Day, Trek-Style]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/love-your-pet-day-trek-style

No one knows for sure who came up with National Love Your Pet Day -- or when -- but Feb. 20 is National Love Your Pet Day and, dammit, Jim, we're going to celebrate it. Below are some of our favorite Star Trek pets.


Porthos

Star Trek, Enterprise, Captain Archer

Captain Archer loved the Enterprise, his crew and his pet beagle, Porthos. As for the dog, Porthos loved Archer and... cheese.


Jil Orra's Wompat

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Chain of Command

Gul Madred taught the care and feeding of Wompats to his daughter, Jil Orra in "Chain of Command." Madred also used the opportunity to put across a lesson in family first.


Spot

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Data

As much as an android could love a feline, Data loved Spot, his cat. Brent Spiner, on the other, didn't exactly bond with the creature.


Christina

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Realm of Fear

O'Brien had a tarantula. After nearly stepping on the Lycosa tarantula while on Titus IV, he kept her as a pet. TNG fans saw Christina just once, in "Realm of Fear." We tried to reach Christina for a comment as to why she appeared only that one time, but she's not yet replied. 


I-Chaya

Star Trek, The Animated Series

Are you crying yet? Just the mention of Spock and I-Chaya makes us well up. And a mere peek at the cartoon image of Spock with his beloved, doomed creature makes us bawl like a baby.


Neelix

Star Trek, Voyager

No, not that Neelix. Lt. Reginald Barclay had a cat named Neelix, and the cat liked Deanna Troi's ice cream. (Editor's note: we haven't forgotten about Isis, Gary Seven's pet, but we're nearing kitty overkill, so we're just going with Spot and Neelix). 


Tribbles

Star Trek, The Original Series

Who's doesn't love a Tribble? Everyone loves a Tribble, til they're trouble.


Again, happy Love Your Pet Day. And now please get off the computer or your device and give your pet a hug.

]]>

No one knows for sure who came up with National Love Your Pet Day -- or when -- but Feb. 20 is National Love Your Pet Day and, dammit, Jim, we're going to celebrate it. Below are some of our favorite Star Trek pets.


Porthos

Star Trek, Enterprise, Captain Archer

Captain Archer loved the Enterprise, his crew and his pet beagle, Porthos. As for the dog, Porthos loved Archer and... cheese.


Jil Orra's Wompat

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Chain of Command

Gul Madred taught the care and feeding of Wompats to his daughter, Jil Orra in "Chain of Command." Madred also used the opportunity to put across a lesson in family first.


Spot

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Data

As much as an android could love a feline, Data loved Spot, his cat. Brent Spiner, on the other, didn't exactly bond with the creature.


Christina

Star Trek, The Next Generation, Realm of Fear

O'Brien had a tarantula. After nearly stepping on the Lycosa tarantula while on Titus IV, he kept her as a pet. TNG fans saw Christina just once, in "Realm of Fear." We tried to reach Christina for a comment as to why she appeared only that one time, but she's not yet replied. 


I-Chaya

Star Trek, The Animated Series

Are you crying yet? Just the mention of Spock and I-Chaya makes us well up. And a mere peek at the cartoon image of Spock with his beloved, doomed creature makes us bawl like a baby.


Neelix

Star Trek, Voyager

No, not that Neelix. Lt. Reginald Barclay had a cat named Neelix, and the cat liked Deanna Troi's ice cream. (Editor's note: we haven't forgotten about Isis, Gary Seven's pet, but we're nearing kitty overkill, so we're just going with Spot and Neelix). 


Tribbles

Star Trek, The Original Series

Who's doesn't love a Tribble? Everyone loves a Tribble, til they're trouble.


Again, happy Love Your Pet Day. And now please get off the computer or your device and give your pet a hug.

]]>
love-your-pet-day-trek-style Mon, 20 Feb 2017 06:35:37 -0800
<![CDATA[Sulu, Excelsior Back in Action]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/sulu-excelsior-back-in-action

Oh my! The U.S.S. Excelsior is back... with fan favorite, Captain Hikaru Sulu.

This March, WizKids/NECA will release Star Trek: Attack Wing Wave 29 -- and StarTrek.com has the exclusive First Look at the ships in the upcoming expansion packs, starting with the U.S.S. Excelsior (Repaint).

The U.S.S. Excelsior has a long and distinguished service history in the Federation. However, it is probably best known as the ship of classic series helmsman Hikaru Sulu when he was promoted to captain as seen in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Originally released in Wave 2, the U.S.S. Excelsior is a midsized Federation Ship that boasts a 3 Primary Weapon Value with 1 Agility, 5 Hull and 4 Shields. Three Crew, one Weapon and one Tech Upgrade slot means that the U.S.S. Excelsior can take a beating and still get the job done. There is also plenty of room to load up crew, weapons and tech. The U.S.S. Excelsior’s special ability allows you to perform a [Scan] Action as a free Action if there are no enemy ships within Range 1 after you move. 

Star Trek, Star Trek Attack Wing Wave 29


One of the best upgrades you will find in this pack is Dmitri Valtane. If your ship has a [Scan] Token beside it when you attack, you may re-roll up to 2 of your attack dice. Dmitri Valtane works beautifully with the U.S.S. Excelsior’s special ability, helping to ensure you can spend that free Scan to re-roll your attack dice.

Another strong but sometimes overlooked upgrade is Lojur. When your ship fires a Weapon Upgrade that requires you to disable it, you may disable Lojur instead of that Weapon Upgrade. When using standard Torpedoes or other Secondary Weapons that require a disable, Lojur allows you to use that weapon two rounds in a row for only 2 SP. 

Star Trek, Star Trek Attack Wing Wave 29


Last but not least, sometimes you just need to be able to leave and get the heck out of dodge in a hurry. Transwarp Drive allows you to do just that. During the Activation Phase, if your Maneuver Dial reveals a 4 Forward or 5 Forward Maneuver, you may instead use a 6 Forward Maneuver.

Don’t miss the opportunity to get your hands on the U.S.S. Excelsior Expansion Pack (Repaint), available this March. Make sure to let your friendly local game store know you want to pre-order this ship. Even if you already own the U.S.S. Excelsior, you are going to want to purchase the new repaint both for the dynamic new paint job as well as the ability to field a solid starship that can hold its own in any situation.

Visit WizKids/NECA at WizKids.com/AttackWing for additional information about Star Trek: Attack Wing. And keep an eye on StarTrek.com for more First Looks and previews, coming soon.

]]>

Oh my! The U.S.S. Excelsior is back... with fan favorite, Captain Hikaru Sulu.

This March, WizKids/NECA will release Star Trek: Attack Wing Wave 29 -- and StarTrek.com has the exclusive First Look at the ships in the upcoming expansion packs, starting with the U.S.S. Excelsior (Repaint).

The U.S.S. Excelsior has a long and distinguished service history in the Federation. However, it is probably best known as the ship of classic series helmsman Hikaru Sulu when he was promoted to captain as seen in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.

Originally released in Wave 2, the U.S.S. Excelsior is a midsized Federation Ship that boasts a 3 Primary Weapon Value with 1 Agility, 5 Hull and 4 Shields. Three Crew, one Weapon and one Tech Upgrade slot means that the U.S.S. Excelsior can take a beating and still get the job done. There is also plenty of room to load up crew, weapons and tech. The U.S.S. Excelsior’s special ability allows you to perform a [Scan] Action as a free Action if there are no enemy ships within Range 1 after you move. 

Star Trek, Star Trek Attack Wing Wave 29


One of the best upgrades you will find in this pack is Dmitri Valtane. If your ship has a [Scan] Token beside it when you attack, you may re-roll up to 2 of your attack dice. Dmitri Valtane works beautifully with the U.S.S. Excelsior’s special ability, helping to ensure you can spend that free Scan to re-roll your attack dice.

Another strong but sometimes overlooked upgrade is Lojur. When your ship fires a Weapon Upgrade that requires you to disable it, you may disable Lojur instead of that Weapon Upgrade. When using standard Torpedoes or other Secondary Weapons that require a disable, Lojur allows you to use that weapon two rounds in a row for only 2 SP. 

Star Trek, Star Trek Attack Wing Wave 29


Last but not least, sometimes you just need to be able to leave and get the heck out of dodge in a hurry. Transwarp Drive allows you to do just that. During the Activation Phase, if your Maneuver Dial reveals a 4 Forward or 5 Forward Maneuver, you may instead use a 6 Forward Maneuver.

Don’t miss the opportunity to get your hands on the U.S.S. Excelsior Expansion Pack (Repaint), available this March. Make sure to let your friendly local game store know you want to pre-order this ship. Even if you already own the U.S.S. Excelsior, you are going to want to purchase the new repaint both for the dynamic new paint job as well as the ability to field a solid starship that can hold its own in any situation.

Visit WizKids/NECA at WizKids.com/AttackWing for additional information about Star Trek: Attack Wing. And keep an eye on StarTrek.com for more First Looks and previews, coming soon.

]]>
sulu-excelsior-back-in-action Sun, 19 Feb 2017 06:58:26 -0800
<![CDATA[Crew You'd Join On An Away Mission Is... ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/crew-youd-join-on-an-away-mission-is

Which Star Trek crew would YOU join on an away mission? That's the question StarTrek.com asked for our latest weekly poll. Thousands of fans voted, choosing from The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. And here are the results:

Star Trek, Star Trek: The Next Generation

The Next Generation (45%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Voyager

Voyager (20%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Deep Space Nine (15%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: The Original Series

The Original Series (12%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Enterprise

Enterprise (8%)


And where among the results did your choice land?

]]>

Which Star Trek crew would YOU join on an away mission? That's the question StarTrek.com asked for our latest weekly poll. Thousands of fans voted, choosing from The Original Series, The Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise. And here are the results:

Star Trek, Star Trek: The Next Generation

The Next Generation (45%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Voyager

Voyager (20%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Deep Space Nine (15%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: The Original Series

The Original Series (12%)


Star Trek, Star Trek: Enterprise

Enterprise (8%)


And where among the results did your choice land?

]]>
crew-youd-join-on-an-away-mission-is Sun, 19 Feb 2017 06:19:37 -0800
<![CDATA[Legally Blind Woman Sees With VISOR-like Device ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/legally-blind-woman-sees-with-visor-like-device

Geordi La Forge would be proud. Yvonne Felix, a legally blind San Franciscan, can see, and quite well, too, with a device -- a battery-powered headset with liquid lens technology inside -- that resembles the VISOR that Geordi wore on Star Trek: The Next Generation. CNET, as part of their ongoing "Tech Enabled" series about the role techonology plays in helping the disability community, profiled Felix and delved, in tremendous detail, into how the eSight 3 has changed Felix's life.


"The eSight 3 has a camera that works with high-resolution displays and optical prisms in the headset to restore sight to those with low vision," writes CNET senior editor Lexy Savvides. "The video image is presented to the user in a way that can overcome the cause of their vision loss.

"'I remember putting them on and looking up and I saw my husband who I'd been married to for eight years and had never seen before," Felix tells me as we're looking over the San Francisco Bay. "And my 2-month-old son, who we had just brought home from the hospital and he was holding him and it was the most beautiful image, like it's burned in my mind for the rest of my life.'"

Felix, according to Savvides, was just seven years old when she lost her vision after a car struck her. Diagnosed with Stargardt disease, a juvenile form of macular degeneration, she has a blind spot that blocks 98 percent of her visual field.

"Her condition is more suited to eSight than other low vision issues," the article explains. "Macular degeneration and sight loss from diabetes complications are more likely to benefit rather than glaucoma. In these cases, damage to the retina can be greater than eSight can resolve.

"Regardless, anyone can give eSight a try. CEO Dr. Brian Mech explained that eSight has a better than 50 percent chance of working with all conditions. 'The beautiful thing is it's not surgical, it's not medication, it's not a drug. So you can just try it on.'"

Visit www.cnet.com to read the full story.

]]>

Geordi La Forge would be proud. Yvonne Felix, a legally blind San Franciscan, can see, and quite well, too, with a device -- a battery-powered headset with liquid lens technology inside -- that resembles the VISOR that Geordi wore on Star Trek: The Next Generation. CNET, as part of their ongoing "Tech Enabled" series about the role techonology plays in helping the disability community, profiled Felix and delved, in tremendous detail, into how the eSight 3 has changed Felix's life.


"The eSight 3 has a camera that works with high-resolution displays and optical prisms in the headset to restore sight to those with low vision," writes CNET senior editor Lexy Savvides. "The video image is presented to the user in a way that can overcome the cause of their vision loss.

"'I remember putting them on and looking up and I saw my husband who I'd been married to for eight years and had never seen before," Felix tells me as we're looking over the San Francisco Bay. "And my 2-month-old son, who we had just brought home from the hospital and he was holding him and it was the most beautiful image, like it's burned in my mind for the rest of my life.'"

Felix, according to Savvides, was just seven years old when she lost her vision after a car struck her. Diagnosed with Stargardt disease, a juvenile form of macular degeneration, she has a blind spot that blocks 98 percent of her visual field.

"Her condition is more suited to eSight than other low vision issues," the article explains. "Macular degeneration and sight loss from diabetes complications are more likely to benefit rather than glaucoma. In these cases, damage to the retina can be greater than eSight can resolve.

"Regardless, anyone can give eSight a try. CEO Dr. Brian Mech explained that eSight has a better than 50 percent chance of working with all conditions. 'The beautiful thing is it's not surgical, it's not medication, it's not a drug. So you can just try it on.'"

Visit www.cnet.com to read the full story.

]]>
legally-blind-woman-sees-with-visor-like-device Sat, 18 Feb 2017 04:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA[FIRST LOOK: Treknology Explores The Science of Trek ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/first-look-treknology-explores-the-science-of-trek

Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive is set to beam on to bookshelves on October 15, 2017, from Voyageur Press. It's written by Ethan Siegel, a PhD astrophysicist, science writer, author, professor and longtime Star Trek fan. 

Here's an exclusive First Look at the cover and the official synopsis, direct from the publisher:



The name
Star Trek conjures images of faster-than-light spacecraft, holographic crew members, and phasers set to stun. Some of these incredible devices may still be far from our reach, but others have made the leap from science fiction to science fact—and now you can learn the science and engineering of what makes them tick.

Treknology looks at over 25 iconic inventions from the complete history of the Star Trek television and film universe. Author Ethan Siegel explores and profiles these dazzling technologies and their role in Star Trek, the science behind how they work, and how close we are to achieving them in the real world today. This stunning collection is packed with 150 superb film and television stills, prop photography, and scientific diagrams to pull you into another world. Brace yourself for a detailed look at the inner workings of Star Trek’s computing capabilities, communications equipment, medical devices, and awe-inspiring ships. This book is one that no fan of Star Trek, or future tech, will want to miss.

The book will be available in hardcover from Voyageur Press, an imprint of The Quarto Group. It will run 208 pages and cost $30. Visit www.QuartoKnows.com for more information and to pre-order Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive.

]]>

Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive is set to beam on to bookshelves on October 15, 2017, from Voyageur Press. It's written by Ethan Siegel, a PhD astrophysicist, science writer, author, professor and longtime Star Trek fan. 

Here's an exclusive First Look at the cover and the official synopsis, direct from the publisher:



The name
Star Trek conjures images of faster-than-light spacecraft, holographic crew members, and phasers set to stun. Some of these incredible devices may still be far from our reach, but others have made the leap from science fiction to science fact—and now you can learn the science and engineering of what makes them tick.

Treknology looks at over 25 iconic inventions from the complete history of the Star Trek television and film universe. Author Ethan Siegel explores and profiles these dazzling technologies and their role in Star Trek, the science behind how they work, and how close we are to achieving them in the real world today. This stunning collection is packed with 150 superb film and television stills, prop photography, and scientific diagrams to pull you into another world. Brace yourself for a detailed look at the inner workings of Star Trek’s computing capabilities, communications equipment, medical devices, and awe-inspiring ships. This book is one that no fan of Star Trek, or future tech, will want to miss.

The book will be available in hardcover from Voyageur Press, an imprint of The Quarto Group. It will run 208 pages and cost $30. Visit www.QuartoKnows.com for more information and to pre-order Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive.

]]>
first-look-treknology-explores-the-science-of-trek Fri, 17 Feb 2017 09:54:50 -0800
<![CDATA[Koenig, Masterson & More Lend Voices to STO's Artifacts ]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/koenig-masterson-more-lend-voices-to-stos-artifacts

In order to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek: The Original Series, the Star Trek Online team delivered the Agents of Yesterday expansion in the summer of 2016. That expansion, as well as the season Artifacts, is now live on Playstation 4 and Xbox One. Prepare your classic Original Series tunics and dust off your Mark II phasers; you’re about to engage in an amazing adventure in that classic era.

First and foremost, players can create brand-new captains from The Original Series era and engage in a story that takes them through the 23rd century and beyond. There will be a sweeping mystery to solve, one that ties into the overall story Star Trek Online has been telling for years. For players that choose to keep playing with their existing characters, we have a can’t-miss set of five episodes that will tie into the Agents story line and clean up a story arc we’ve been telling for nearly a year.


Star Trek, Star Trek Online

Next, we have an amazing cast of voice actors joining our captains on their adventure through this episodic content. Walter Koenig will be reprising his role as Chekov, and Chris Doohan will be filling in for his father by playing Montgomery “Scotty” Scott. Chase Masterson will be reprising her role as Admiral Leeta from the Mirror Universe, and Matt Winston will be making his Star Trek Online debut as Agent Daniels - originally seen on Star Trek: Enterprise. Finally, we have Joseph Gatt playing the cyborg crewman 0718, a character from the new Star Trek movies. He joins us on our first adventure into that universe.

With the release of Agents of Yesterday: Artifacts on Playstation 4 and Xbox One, Star Trek Online will begin a brand new storyline featuring the episode “Echoes of Light.” Captains will once again meet up with the Lukari, and head off into a an adventure to introduce the formerly isolationist species to galactic exploration. You will be finding strange new worlds, interacting with lifeforms both new and old, and make a discovery that will shape the direction of the Star Trek Online story through all of 2017 and on into the future.

In addition to all of that fresh story content, we have three reputations of amazing end game rewards, 8 queues full of new team based content for everyone to play, and the K13 Fleet Holding to give your fleet new rewards. Also, there's an Original Series-themed social map to relax on, and the Armada System that allows up to 13 fleets to form an Armada to work together towards completing their fleet holdings -- and earning some bonuses while they’re at it.

This release is packed with inventive content. Couple that with the ability to create a new captain from scratch in a free expansion, and there has never been a better time to dive into Star Trek Online.

I’ll see you in game.

Steve Ricossa
Executive Producer
Star Trek Online

]]>

In order to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek: The Original Series, the Star Trek Online team delivered the Agents of Yesterday expansion in the summer of 2016. That expansion, as well as the season Artifacts, is now live on Playstation 4 and Xbox One. Prepare your classic Original Series tunics and dust off your Mark II phasers; you’re about to engage in an amazing adventure in that classic era.

First and foremost, players can create brand-new captains from The Original Series era and engage in a story that takes them through the 23rd century and beyond. There will be a sweeping mystery to solve, one that ties into the overall story Star Trek Online has been telling for years. For players that choose to keep playing with their existing characters, we have a can’t-miss set of five episodes that will tie into the Agents story line and clean up a story arc we’ve been telling for nearly a year.


Star Trek, Star Trek Online

Next, we have an amazing cast of voice actors joining our captains on their adventure through this episodic content. Walter Koenig will be reprising his role as Chekov, and Chris Doohan will be filling in for his father by playing Montgomery “Scotty” Scott. Chase Masterson will be reprising her role as Admiral Leeta from the Mirror Universe, and Matt Winston will be making his Star Trek Online debut as Agent Daniels - originally seen on Star Trek: Enterprise. Finally, we have Joseph Gatt playing the cyborg crewman 0718, a character from the new Star Trek movies. He joins us on our first adventure into that universe.

With the release of Agents of Yesterday: Artifacts on Playstation 4 and Xbox One, Star Trek Online will begin a brand new storyline featuring the episode “Echoes of Light.” Captains will once again meet up with the Lukari, and head off into a an adventure to introduce the formerly isolationist species to galactic exploration. You will be finding strange new worlds, interacting with lifeforms both new and old, and make a discovery that will shape the direction of the Star Trek Online story through all of 2017 and on into the future.

In addition to all of that fresh story content, we have three reputations of amazing end game rewards, 8 queues full of new team based content for everyone to play, and the K13 Fleet Holding to give your fleet new rewards. Also, there's an Original Series-themed social map to relax on, and the Armada System that allows up to 13 fleets to form an Armada to work together towards completing their fleet holdings -- and earning some bonuses while they’re at it.

This release is packed with inventive content. Couple that with the ability to create a new captain from scratch in a free expansion, and there has never been a better time to dive into Star Trek Online.

I’ll see you in game.

Steve Ricossa
Executive Producer
Star Trek Online

]]>
koenig-masterson-more-lend-voices-to-stos-artifacts Fri, 17 Feb 2017 07:17:23 -0800
<![CDATA[Shirts and Skins in TOS]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/shirts-and-skins-in-tos

Many fans of Star Trek: The Original Series are interested in the details of things that are seen in the episodes, and we, as collectors and curators of TOS film and photographs, often get asked if we could examine our material to get information for them. For example, we’ve been asked about the how effects were done, what the details of certain props look like, whether a particular stuntman was in a particular scene and so on. However, two important questions that we are asked fairly frequently are:

Why does Kirk’s command tunic sometimes appear gold and other times greenish?

Why does Mr. Spock’s skin color seem to vary from chicken-soup yellow to crab pink?

They’re good questions, and ones that we ourselves asked when we were learning about TOS. And since they do get asked often, we thought we’d address them here, at StarTrek.com. Interestingly, and as you’ll see, the answer to both questions is fundamentally the same, so please keep reading and you’ll see that the issues related to color in TOS are pretty… black and white.


Command Tunic Color

So, what color was Kirk’s command tunic? Was it gold, mustard, green or something else completely different? Well, the answer to that question can be found directly from the source. That is, based on fabric samples from costume designer William Theiss as well as interviews with him, we know it was actually a very subtle avocado green and not gold or mustard as it sometimes appeared in the episodes. Simply, Theiss wanted the three Starfleet service branches to be represented by the three primary colors. He selected red for engineering, blue for sciences and… wait for it… green for command. He was actually fairly consistent in his approach and even designed the work jumpsuits using this same scheme.

But, and to get to the changing command-tunic-color issue, if Theiss fabricated the command shirt from an avocado-colored fabric, why did it sometimes appear gold in the episodes?

As we mentioned previously, the answer to that question is the same as that for the question of why Mr. Spock’s Vulcan makeup sometimes appears pink. So, let’s address that issue next, and then we’ll get to the reasons for both.


Vulcan Skin Tones

Most everyone who’s reading this article knows that makeup artist Fred Phillips spent a great deal of time determining what color Mr. Spock’s skin should be before settling on something that resembled yellow chicken soup (according to Robert Justman in Inside Star Trek: The Real Story). From a practical standpoint, he made the Vulcans this color because Gene Roddenberry wanted the race to look different from the humans. And to do that, in that era when the majority of households had black and white televisions and color sets were relatively new, Phillips settled on a yellow color. That color, after extensive testing, looked good on both color and black and white televisions (darker colors looked muddy on monochrome sets and lighter ones washed out). 

But… careful observers have noticed that sometimes Mr. Spock’s yellow tones look pink in the episodes, similar to those of the humans.

Why is that?

Well, as we said at the beginning of this article, the answer to both questions posed at the beginning – that is, why do the command tunics sometimes appear gold? and why does Mr. Spock’s skin vary from yellow to pink? – is the same. And there are five major reasons for these differences. Let’s briefly run through them, starting with those that influence the colors on the final broadcast print.


Eastman Kodak Film

The first reason that the colors shifted has to do with the film used back in the 1960’s. TOS was shot on an Eastman Kodak negative film and the prints struck from it had a color gamut (that is, range) that favored a warmer palette. In fact, cinematographers have known for quite a while that the consumer and professional Kodak print films tend to have warm green colors that lean toward yellow. What this means, for example, is that colors that are a particular shade of green – such as the command tunics – would be shifted towards yellow in the print.


Color Temperature

Another reason that the colors of the command shirts and Vulcan skin appear to be shifted on the film has to do with the type of lighting used on the set (basically indoor, or “tungsten,” lighting) and how different that is from “natural light.” As a real-life example of how these types of differences in lighting affect color, anyone who buys paint at a hardware store knows that the color of the paint in the store can look completely different than the color of it on your wall at home. This has to do with the lighting differences between the store and your home and gets at something called color temperature. Color temperature, basically, refers to color bias and, with regards to lighting, some lights are biased blue and are referred to as cold, while others are biased red and are referred to as warm. Camera flashes, some fluorescent lights (like in our hypothetical hardware store) and the sun are blue biased while old-school tungsten lights (like in some of our homes) are red biased.

With regards to the command tunic material, it looks unmistakably green under daylight or flash conditions but, under tungsten studio soundstage lighting, the warmer colored lights combined with the film print stock caused the particular green to look yellow/gold when viewed. Theiss must have been disappointed in how the tunics looked on television because he designed two wraparound versions for William Shatner that had deeper, different shades of green.


Color Timing

A third reason as to why the colors were different, which is also the reason that principally accounted for their variability from scene-to-scene and from episode-to-episode, had to do with color timing. Color timing, as that term implies, refers to changing or enhancing the color of an image in a motion picture, and it’s done by a person called a colorist. A colorist’s job involves matching the luminance and color values from scene to scene but, unfortunately, they can be inconsistent and biased. Sometimes, for example, a colorist opts for making people look as pleasing as possible, which implies a healthy, rosy, red-biased complexion. This desire often resulted in Captain Kirk and Dr. McCoy looking good, but it sometimes negated the correct make-up color for Mr. Spock. (As a Trek fan, you may have heard about the infamous Orion makeup test for the pilot episode, “The Cage,” where the green makeup looked pink because the color timer assumed the film had a green bias to it that he corrected for.)


Optical Effects

Another reason that the colors on the screen did not resemble their real-life colors, and the final one that we’ll look at with regards to the color shifts in the final print, has to do with whether or not the film was run through an optical printer (the device that was used to create the optical effects). Specifically, whenever an optical effect was present in a scene – e.g., a transporter effect, a dissolve to a different scene, etc. – there was generally a color shift in that scene in comparison to the preceding and/or proceeding scenes. This shift, which was accompanied by an increase in contrast and film grain, was a result of how the optical printer was used to create the effect and the fact that multiple, different pieces of film were often used. Additionally, since TOS used more than one company to create the optical effects, even for the same episode, different companies handled the film differently.

It probably goes without saying that, given the time and money, these discrepancies caused by the optical printing process could have been corrected. However, TOS had neither, and, unfortunately, leaving the color shifts in place added more weight to the misperception of what the colors truly were.

Below are examples of scenes that were created using an optical printer, and all of the photos in the collage were obtained from the re-mastered digital versions. Photo No.1 shows a screen capture of a typical dissolve transition, and note that the command shirt is yellow and Spock’s flesh tones have a magenta tinge. No.2 was captured just after a transporter effect and, again, the command tunics are yellow and the flesh tones have shifted to magenta. No.3 was obtained from an optical effect to simulate the ship shaking and, again, yellow tunics and magenta tinted flesh tones. No.4 is a scene transition where the image squeezes together and then widens out. The red tunics in this short sequence have a color shift, this time to orange.


The Eyes Have It

Up to this point, we’ve been discussing the factors that influenced the colors in the final broadcast prints of the episodes. However, recording the images on the film was only about half the process of getting TOS into your home. The other half, of course, was transferring the images on the film to your eyes, and these steps involved scanning the film, digitally encoding it (or broadcasting it as was done in the old days), and then displaying the result on your television. Needless to say, all of these variables can shift the actual color of the images that you see, and they generally do, since they each have a more limited gamut than either your eyes or the film.

And with that, we’re finished. We hope you were able to find some nuggets of gold – or avocado green, in this poorly timed pun – in our discussion of color shifts in TOS. Until next time.


David Tilotta is a professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC and works in the areas of chemistry and sustainable materials technology. You can email David at david.tilotta@frontier.com. Curt McAloney is an accomplished graphic artist with extensive experience in multimedia, Internet and print design. He resides in a suburb of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, and can be contacted at curt@curtsmedia.com. Together, Curt and David work on startrekhistory.com. Their Star Trek work has appeared in the Star Trek Magazine and Star Trek: The Original Series 365 by Paula M. Block with Terry J. Edrmann.

]]>

Many fans of Star Trek: The Original Series are interested in the details of things that are seen in the episodes, and we, as collectors and curators of TOS film and photographs, often get asked if we could examine our material to get information for them. For example, we’ve been asked about the how effects were done, what the details of certain props look like, whether a particular stuntman was in a particular scene and so on. However, two important questions that we are asked fairly frequently are:

Why does Kirk’s command tunic sometimes appear gold and other times greenish?

Why does Mr. Spock’s skin color seem to vary from chicken-soup yellow to crab pink?

They’re good questions, and ones that we ourselves asked when we were learning about TOS. And since they do get asked often, we thought we’d address them here, at StarTrek.com. Interestingly, and as you’ll see, the answer to both questions is fundamentally the same, so please keep reading and you’ll see that the issues related to color in TOS are pretty… black and white.


Command Tunic Color

So, what color was Kirk’s command tunic? Was it gold, mustard, green or something else completely different? Well, the answer to that question can be found directly from the source. That is, based on fabric samples from costume designer William Theiss as well as interviews with him, we know it was actually a very subtle avocado green and not gold or mustard as it sometimes appeared in the episodes. Simply, Theiss wanted the three Starfleet service branches to be represented by the three primary colors. He selected red for engineering, blue for sciences and… wait for it… green for command. He was actually fairly consistent in his approach and even designed the work jumpsuits using this same scheme.

But, and to get to the changing command-tunic-color issue, if Theiss fabricated the command shirt from an avocado-colored fabric, why did it sometimes appear gold in the episodes?

As we mentioned previously, the answer to that question is the same as that for the question of why Mr. Spock’s Vulcan makeup sometimes appears pink. So, let’s address that issue next, and then we’ll get to the reasons for both.


Vulcan Skin Tones

Most everyone who’s reading this article knows that makeup artist Fred Phillips spent a great deal of time determining what color Mr. Spock’s skin should be before settling on something that resembled yellow chicken soup (according to Robert Justman in Inside Star Trek: The Real Story). From a practical standpoint, he made the Vulcans this color because Gene Roddenberry wanted the race to look different from the humans. And to do that, in that era when the majority of households had black and white televisions and color sets were relatively new, Phillips settled on a yellow color. That color, after extensive testing, looked good on both color and black and white televisions (darker colors looked muddy on monochrome sets and lighter ones washed out). 

But… careful observers have noticed that sometimes Mr. Spock’s yellow tones look pink in the episodes, similar to those of the humans.

Why is that?

Well, as we said at the beginning of this article, the answer to both questions posed at the beginning – that is, why do the command tunics sometimes appear gold? and why does Mr. Spock’s skin vary from yellow to pink? – is the same. And there are five major reasons for these differences. Let’s briefly run through them, starting with those that influence the colors on the final broadcast print.


Eastman Kodak Film

The first reason that the colors shifted has to do with the film used back in the 1960’s. TOS was shot on an Eastman Kodak negative film and the prints struck from it had a color gamut (that is, range) that favored a warmer palette. In fact, cinematographers have known for quite a while that the consumer and professional Kodak print films tend to have warm green colors that lean toward yellow. What this means, for example, is that colors that are a particular shade of green – such as the command tunics – would be shifted towards yellow in the print.


Color Temperature

Another reason that the colors of the command shirts and Vulcan skin appear to be shifted on the film has to do with the type of lighting used on the set (basically indoor, or “tungsten,” lighting) and how different that is from “natural light.” As a real-life example of how these types of differences in lighting affect color, anyone who buys paint at a hardware store knows that the color of the paint in the store can look completely different than the color of it on your wall at home. This has to do with the lighting differences between the store and your home and gets at something called color temperature. Color temperature, basically, refers to color bias and, with regards to lighting, some lights are biased blue and are referred to as cold, while others are biased red and are referred to as warm. Camera flashes, some fluorescent lights (like in our hypothetical hardware store) and the sun are blue biased while old-school tungsten lights (like in some of our homes) are red biased.

With regards to the command tunic material, it looks unmistakably green under daylight or flash conditions but, under tungsten studio soundstage lighting, the warmer colored lights combined with the film print stock caused the particular green to look yellow/gold when viewed. Theiss must have been disappointed in how the tunics looked on television because he designed two wraparound versions for William Shatner that had deeper, different shades of green.


Color Timing

A third reason as to why the colors were different, which is also the reason that principally accounted for their variability from scene-to-scene and from episode-to-episode, had to do with color timing. Color timing, as that term implies, refers to changing or enhancing the color of an image in a motion picture, and it’s done by a person called a colorist. A colorist’s job involves matching the luminance and color values from scene to scene but, unfortunately, they can be inconsistent and biased. Sometimes, for example, a colorist opts for making people look as pleasing as possible, which implies a healthy, rosy, red-biased complexion. This desire often resulted in Captain Kirk and Dr. McCoy looking good, but it sometimes negated the correct make-up color for Mr. Spock. (As a Trek fan, you may have heard about the infamous Orion makeup test for the pilot episode, “The Cage,” where the green makeup looked pink because the color timer assumed the film had a green bias to it that he corrected for.)


Optical Effects

Another reason that the colors on the screen did not resemble their real-life colors, and the final one that we’ll look at with regards to the color shifts in the final print, has to do with whether or not the film was run through an optical printer (the device that was used to create the optical effects). Specifically, whenever an optical effect was present in a scene – e.g., a transporter effect, a dissolve to a different scene, etc. – there was generally a color shift in that scene in comparison to the preceding and/or proceeding scenes. This shift, which was accompanied by an increase in contrast and film grain, was a result of how the optical printer was used to create the effect and the fact that multiple, different pieces of film were often used. Additionally, since TOS used more than one company to create the optical effects, even for the same episode, different companies handled the film differently.

It probably goes without saying that, given the time and money, these discrepancies caused by the optical printing process could have been corrected. However, TOS had neither, and, unfortunately, leaving the color shifts in place added more weight to the misperception of what the colors truly were.

Below are examples of scenes that were created using an optical printer, and all of the photos in the collage were obtained from the re-mastered digital versions. Photo No.1 shows a screen capture of a typical dissolve transition, and note that the command shirt is yellow and Spock’s flesh tones have a magenta tinge. No.2 was captured just after a transporter effect and, again, the command tunics are yellow and the flesh tones have shifted to magenta. No.3 was obtained from an optical effect to simulate the ship shaking and, again, yellow tunics and magenta tinted flesh tones. No.4 is a scene transition where the image squeezes together and then widens out. The red tunics in this short sequence have a color shift, this time to orange.


The Eyes Have It

Up to this point, we’ve been discussing the factors that influenced the colors in the final broadcast prints of the episodes. However, recording the images on the film was only about half the process of getting TOS into your home. The other half, of course, was transferring the images on the film to your eyes, and these steps involved scanning the film, digitally encoding it (or broadcasting it as was done in the old days), and then displaying the result on your television. Needless to say, all of these variables can shift the actual color of the images that you see, and they generally do, since they each have a more limited gamut than either your eyes or the film.

And with that, we’re finished. We hope you were able to find some nuggets of gold – or avocado green, in this poorly timed pun – in our discussion of color shifts in TOS. Until next time.


David Tilotta is a professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC and works in the areas of chemistry and sustainable materials technology. You can email David at david.tilotta@frontier.com. Curt McAloney is an accomplished graphic artist with extensive experience in multimedia, Internet and print design. He resides in a suburb of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, and can be contacted at curt@curtsmedia.com. Together, Curt and David work on startrekhistory.com. Their Star Trek work has appeared in the Star Trek Magazine and Star Trek: The Original Series 365 by Paula M. Block with Terry J. Edrmann.

]]>
shirts-and-skins-in-tos Fri, 17 Feb 2017 06:00:00 -0800
<![CDATA["Space Seed" Debuted on Feb. 16, 1967]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/space-seed-debuted-on-feb-16-1967

The reality is this: Star Trek might not be what it is today and might not have ever celebrated its 50th anniversary as a living, breathing franchise, were it not for "Space Seed," the Star Trek: The Original Series episode that debuted on February 16, 1967 -- or 50 years ago today. It was "Space Seed" that inspired Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, and it was The Wrath of Khan that "saved" Star Trek and paved the way for all that's come since. To mark the occasion, we thought we'd indulge in some facts, figures and anecdotes about "Space Seed."


And... Action!

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

"Space Seed" first rolled camera on December 15, 1966.


120 Scenes? Yes, 120 Scenes

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

According to StarTrek.com guest bloggers Maria Jose and John Tenuto, who wrote an extensive six-part series of pieces for us a couple of years ago about the making of the episode, there were a total of 120 scenes, and it took the crew and actors about 66 hours to film the entire 51-minute episode.


Directed By Marc Daniels...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Marc Daniels directed "Space Seed." He'd collaborated with Gene Roddenberry on The Lieutenant. One of his episodes of The Lieutenant, “In the Highest Tradition,” featured three future Star Trek actors, Leonard Nimoy, Majel Barrett and Gary Lockwood. Daniels directed a total of 14 TOS episodes and penned the Star Trek: The Animated Series episode “Once Upon a Planet.” Daniels passed away in 1989 at the age of 77.


The Wrath of ... Ericcson?

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Khan's original name was supposed to be Harold Ericcson, with Ericcson spelled several different ways throughout pre-production, until the name became Khan. Oh, and Ericcson, according to Memory Alpha, was meant to be a Nordic superman.


Craft Services Costs More Now...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

The budget for "Space Seed" was $192,654. Per the Tenutos, it actually cost less than that, thanks to the efficient work of producer Robert Justman.


Choke Me or Cut My Throat!

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialoge #1: "Well either choke me or cut my throat!" Dr. McCoy shouted at Khan. "Make up your mind!"


Montalban and Rhue BEFORE "Space Seed"

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Did you know that Ricardo Montalban, who played Khan, and Madlyn Rhue, who played Marla McGivers had once before played husband and wife? It's true, and they did so in a 1960 episode of Bonanza titled "Day of Reckoning," an hour with echoes of The Wrath of Khan's revenge storyline.


Khan Changed Outfits FIVE Times

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

"William Ware Theiss’ costume design work on 'Space Seed' is remarkable for its iconic nature and its interesting symbolism," the Tenutos wrote on in a StarTrek.com guest blog. "Even with limited time, the costumes of 'Space Seed' say something symbolic. Khan, for example, changes his outfit five times. Two are reuses of previously designed costumes (Gary Mitchell’s blue medical costume and an engineering costume). As an interesting aside, Khan does seem to like wearing Starfleet regalia: he does so in 'Space Seed, in The Wrath of Khan (wearing both the broken Starfleet insignia and Starfleet jacket) and in Star Trek Into Darkness (as John Harrison in the black Starfleet shirt).


A Superior Line

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #2: "Superior ability," Spock notes, "breeds superior ambition."

A Missing Scene

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Khan, when he makes his move against the Enterprise, first beams to the Botany Bay with Marla’s help to pick up his crew. In the episode as edited and aired, the Tenutos note, "Khan greets his people on the Botany Bay, and the next sequence occurs on the bridge as the episode shows the effects of Khan taking over ship systems. In the filmed episode, we would have seen Khan and his people actually returning to the Enterprise in the transporter room. We never do see that, but luckily there is a photograph of this moment preserved on a Lincoln Enterprise slide fans could purchase during the 1970s."


Most Illogical

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #3: "We can be against him and admire him all at the same time," Kirk said to a befuddled Spock.


I Love Lucy, We All Love Lucy

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

It was during the production of "Space Seed" that Roddenberry learned that NBC had decided to keep Star Trek on the air for the full season. Dated October 5, 1996, the letter came from Lucille Ball, the boss at Desilu Studios, and it read: "Dear Gene and the rest of you hardworking people. Just heard the good news, and want you to know how proud and happy I am. Looks like you have a real hit on your hands, and we appreciate your efforts."


A World to Win...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #4: "And I've gotten something else I wanted," Khan utters at his hearing. "...A world to win, an empire to build."


Chekov And Sulu Went to Lunch?

Star Trek, The Wrath of Khan

Walter Koenig and George Takei were MIA in "Space Seed." Of course, in The Wrath of Khan, the vengeful Khan somehow remembered Chekov.


Did Spock Foresee Wrath of Khan?

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #5: "It would be interesting, captain, to return to that world in 100 years," Spock presciently says to Kirk, "and to learn what crop has sprung from the seed you planted today."

]]>

The reality is this: Star Trek might not be what it is today and might not have ever celebrated its 50th anniversary as a living, breathing franchise, were it not for "Space Seed," the Star Trek: The Original Series episode that debuted on February 16, 1967 -- or 50 years ago today. It was "Space Seed" that inspired Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, and it was The Wrath of Khan that "saved" Star Trek and paved the way for all that's come since. To mark the occasion, we thought we'd indulge in some facts, figures and anecdotes about "Space Seed."


And... Action!

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

"Space Seed" first rolled camera on December 15, 1966.


120 Scenes? Yes, 120 Scenes

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

According to StarTrek.com guest bloggers Maria Jose and John Tenuto, who wrote an extensive six-part series of pieces for us a couple of years ago about the making of the episode, there were a total of 120 scenes, and it took the crew and actors about 66 hours to film the entire 51-minute episode.


Directed By Marc Daniels...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Marc Daniels directed "Space Seed." He'd collaborated with Gene Roddenberry on The Lieutenant. One of his episodes of The Lieutenant, “In the Highest Tradition,” featured three future Star Trek actors, Leonard Nimoy, Majel Barrett and Gary Lockwood. Daniels directed a total of 14 TOS episodes and penned the Star Trek: The Animated Series episode “Once Upon a Planet.” Daniels passed away in 1989 at the age of 77.


The Wrath of ... Ericcson?

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Khan's original name was supposed to be Harold Ericcson, with Ericcson spelled several different ways throughout pre-production, until the name became Khan. Oh, and Ericcson, according to Memory Alpha, was meant to be a Nordic superman.


Craft Services Costs More Now...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

The budget for "Space Seed" was $192,654. Per the Tenutos, it actually cost less than that, thanks to the efficient work of producer Robert Justman.


Choke Me or Cut My Throat!

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialoge #1: "Well either choke me or cut my throat!" Dr. McCoy shouted at Khan. "Make up your mind!"


Montalban and Rhue BEFORE "Space Seed"

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Did you know that Ricardo Montalban, who played Khan, and Madlyn Rhue, who played Marla McGivers had once before played husband and wife? It's true, and they did so in a 1960 episode of Bonanza titled "Day of Reckoning," an hour with echoes of The Wrath of Khan's revenge storyline.


Khan Changed Outfits FIVE Times

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

"William Ware Theiss’ costume design work on 'Space Seed' is remarkable for its iconic nature and its interesting symbolism," the Tenutos wrote on in a StarTrek.com guest blog. "Even with limited time, the costumes of 'Space Seed' say something symbolic. Khan, for example, changes his outfit five times. Two are reuses of previously designed costumes (Gary Mitchell’s blue medical costume and an engineering costume). As an interesting aside, Khan does seem to like wearing Starfleet regalia: he does so in 'Space Seed, in The Wrath of Khan (wearing both the broken Starfleet insignia and Starfleet jacket) and in Star Trek Into Darkness (as John Harrison in the black Starfleet shirt).


A Superior Line

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #2: "Superior ability," Spock notes, "breeds superior ambition."

A Missing Scene

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Khan, when he makes his move against the Enterprise, first beams to the Botany Bay with Marla’s help to pick up his crew. In the episode as edited and aired, the Tenutos note, "Khan greets his people on the Botany Bay, and the next sequence occurs on the bridge as the episode shows the effects of Khan taking over ship systems. In the filmed episode, we would have seen Khan and his people actually returning to the Enterprise in the transporter room. We never do see that, but luckily there is a photograph of this moment preserved on a Lincoln Enterprise slide fans could purchase during the 1970s."


Most Illogical

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #3: "We can be against him and admire him all at the same time," Kirk said to a befuddled Spock.


I Love Lucy, We All Love Lucy

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

It was during the production of "Space Seed" that Roddenberry learned that NBC had decided to keep Star Trek on the air for the full season. Dated October 5, 1996, the letter came from Lucille Ball, the boss at Desilu Studios, and it read: "Dear Gene and the rest of you hardworking people. Just heard the good news, and want you to know how proud and happy I am. Looks like you have a real hit on your hands, and we appreciate your efforts."


A World to Win...

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #4: "And I've gotten something else I wanted," Khan utters at his hearing. "...A world to win, an empire to build."


Chekov And Sulu Went to Lunch?

Star Trek, The Wrath of Khan

Walter Koenig and George Takei were MIA in "Space Seed." Of course, in The Wrath of Khan, the vengeful Khan somehow remembered Chekov.


Did Spock Foresee Wrath of Khan?

Star Trek, The Original Series, Space Seed

Memorable bit of dialogue #5: "It would be interesting, captain, to return to that world in 100 years," Spock presciently says to Kirk, "and to learn what crop has sprung from the seed you planted today."

]]>
space-seed-debuted-on-feb-16-1967 Thu, 16 Feb 2017 10:19:46 -0800
<![CDATA[Mission Set for Operation Enterprise Roller Coaster]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/mission-set-for-operation-enterprise-roller-coaster

Guests at Movie Park Germany in 2017 can look forward to exploring the galaxy on Europe’s first licensed Star Trek roller coaster. Set to open in the early spring 2017, the triple launch coaster features a Star Trek: The Next Generation theme and is called Star Trek: Operation Enterprise.

Here’s how Movie Park Germany describes the ride:

Speed is of the essence. There’s no time to think. Every maneuver has to be perfectly executed. There’s only one attempt. Starfleet's enemy the Borg have the U.S.S. Enterprise locked in their tractor beam. The ship and its crew have been captured. The bridge of the Enterprise is deserted. The only hope of rescue is to send Starfleet cadets on a bold rescue mission. 

This rescue mission isn’t going to be easy. The Borg ship’s deflector shields will have to be breached so that its main systems can be destroyed. It’s the only way to save the crew of the Enterprise. Despite an incredible adrenalin rush, the cadets have to fully focus on the task at hand. That’s the new mission in deep space for Movie Park Germany’s guests.


Other highlights:

  • A twisted halfpipe with a 40-meter elevation that is the only one of its kind in Europe.
  • An eight-ton transfer track system.Triple launch means that instead of slowly climbing the first incline, the coaster is launched at high speed three times. It’s the first time Movie Park Germany has incorporated such a launch concept in one of its coaster rides.
  • Located at the main entrance of the park, this coaster is the destination’s second-highest structure and has fundamentally changed its skyline.
  • In addition to the roller coaster, guests can enjoy the brand-new Federation Plaza themed area. The futuristic Star Trek set brings the Starfleet Academy world to life, with guests effectively becoming Starfleet cadets who are then sent on a mission - namely Operation Enterprise - to save the entire crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise before the Borg can assimilate them.

Star Trek: Operation Enterprise, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Roller coaster, MoviePark

 

Visit www.moviepark.de/startrek for more information about the attraction and the storyline.

]]>

Guests at Movie Park Germany in 2017 can look forward to exploring the galaxy on Europe’s first licensed Star Trek roller coaster. Set to open in the early spring 2017, the triple launch coaster features a Star Trek: The Next Generation theme and is called Star Trek: Operation Enterprise.

Here’s how Movie Park Germany describes the ride:

Speed is of the essence. There’s no time to think. Every maneuver has to be perfectly executed. There’s only one attempt. Starfleet's enemy the Borg have the U.S.S. Enterprise locked in their tractor beam. The ship and its crew have been captured. The bridge of the Enterprise is deserted. The only hope of rescue is to send Starfleet cadets on a bold rescue mission. 

This rescue mission isn’t going to be easy. The Borg ship’s deflector shields will have to be breached so that its main systems can be destroyed. It’s the only way to save the crew of the Enterprise. Despite an incredible adrenalin rush, the cadets have to fully focus on the task at hand. That’s the new mission in deep space for Movie Park Germany’s guests.


Other highlights:

  • A twisted halfpipe with a 40-meter elevation that is the only one of its kind in Europe.
  • An eight-ton transfer track system.Triple launch means that instead of slowly climbing the first incline, the coaster is launched at high speed three times. It’s the first time Movie Park Germany has incorporated such a launch concept in one of its coaster rides.
  • Located at the main entrance of the park, this coaster is the destination’s second-highest structure and has fundamentally changed its skyline.
  • In addition to the roller coaster, guests can enjoy the brand-new Federation Plaza themed area. The futuristic Star Trek set brings the Starfleet Academy world to life, with guests effectively becoming Starfleet cadets who are then sent on a mission - namely Operation Enterprise - to save the entire crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise before the Borg can assimilate them.

Star Trek: Operation Enterprise, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Roller coaster, MoviePark

 

Visit www.moviepark.de/startrek for more information about the attraction and the storyline.

]]>
mission-set-for-operation-enterprise-roller-coaster Thu, 16 Feb 2017 00:45:00 -0800
<![CDATA[When the Sun Disappears]]> http://www.startrek.com/article/when-the-sun-disappears

Any planet that has at least one moon is potentially subject to experiencing eclipses. What form these eclipses take depends on the size(s) and the orbit(s) of the moon(s).


Star Trek, Voyager, Ex Post Facto, Lidell Ren

We have not seen any eclipses in the Star Trek Universe, though we do know they occur on worlds other than Earth. In the Voyager episode “Ex Post Facto,” Lidell Ren talks about an eclipse that she and her husband Professor Tolen Ren witnessed on his home planet Banea back in 2367. Banea has one moon, so in that sense the conditions are similar to ours here on Earth.

Here on Earth we experience two basic types of eclipses, lunar and solar. During both, the Earth and the Moon have to be exactly aligned with the Sun, so that the shadow of one body can hit the other. Our Moon orbits Earth inclined by about 5 degrees, which is why we don’t get eclipses regularly every month. Only when the line of intersection of the orbital planes of the Moon and the Earth (line of nodes) is directly aligned with the Sun can the shadows hit.

When the Earth’s shadow covers the Moon, we have a lunar eclipse. We actually had one just last night. If the Moon goes exactly through Earth shadow, it is a total lunar eclipse. As the Earth is much bigger than the Moon, the Moon can be covered entirely by Earth’s shadow, so everyone on the night side of Earth can see the eclipse.

When the Moon’s shadow hits the Earth, we have a solar eclipse. Since the Moon is much smaller than the Earth, its shadow is much smaller, and it only hits a small area on the Earth. But since Earth rotates around its axis, that spot marches across Earth’s surface. It so happens that the sizes and distances of Moon and Sun from Earth are such that the Moon can cover the Sun exactly. This is what we call a total solar eclipse. And it is a wondrous sight!

And why am I going on about this? As it turns out, this year, specifically on 21 August, the shadow of the Moon will travel across the United States from the Northwest to the Southeast. It has been dubbed the “Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017,” and it is a marvelous opportunity for everyone in the US to experience this unique phenomenon without having to join an expensive expedition. Everyone in the US is within a few hundred miles of the path of totality.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 1: The path of totality across the United States. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 2: This image shows in a bit more detail the areas the path of totality will traverse. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 3: Some special places around the US are setting up public viewing spots along the path of totality. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek,When the Sun Disappears

Figure 4: A total solar eclipse. This is the only time you can see the corona of the Sun. Source: NASA.


Star Trek,When the Sun Disappears

Figure 5: The effects of a partial solar eclipse. The sunlight goes though the leaves to show an eclipse “ghost” (reflection). Source: Inge Heyer (Laramie, Wyoming, 20 May 2012).

NASA has made a video showing a simulation of the expected path of totality across the US. It has amazing detail and will help people find a good spot to observe the eclipse. The URL is shown below.

If you plan to travel to be in the path of totality, you might be disappointed to find out that all hotel rooms have been booked for months if not years. But friends managed to find a campground for an RV just the other day. So there are still opportunities to find a place to stay, but you have to act quickly, and you might need to be prepared to rough it.

Find yourself an area where you will be able to observe the Sun without anything in the way. Totality itself will be about 2 minutes and 40 seconds, but the partial concealment of the Sun on either side is also very interesting to watch.

There are many resources for you to inform yourself about this incredible natural phenomenon. The website for the Great American Eclipse is one, and of course NASA also has information available. Both URLs are given below. You can find out when exactly the eclipse will happen at the location you wish to travel to.

Now to the most important aspect of this endeavor: SAFETY! Do not ever look directly at the Sun! You will damage your eyes!

There are many ways to observe the Sun safely. You can make a basic pinhole camera to obtain a projection of the Sun’s image, you can use a mirror to project the Sun’s image onto a screen, you can use eclipse glasses which are available on the web, and you can use specialty filters for your camera (also available on the web and from your better photography specialty stores). Regular sun glasses are not enough! You need the special equipment mentioned here to do this safely.

I hope all of you will take this opportunity to see one of our world’s greatest natural phenomena.

Here are a few links for you if you’d like to know more about this topic.

The Great American Eclipse:
https://www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com

2017 Eclipse Across American through the Eyes of NASA:
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

The path of totality across the US (NASA video):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJgXaqW3md8

Memory Alpha:
http://en.memory-alpha.org

If you are interested in hearing more about the latest discoveries in the physical sciences and technology in a fannish setting, come visit us at Shore Leave next summer (7-9 July 2017). This fan-run convention features over 12 hours of science programming, in addition of course to all the usual con activities. One of our speakers from NASA will specifically talk about the 2017 Eclipse and how you can prepare yourself. For more information please visit www.shore-leave.com.

Inge Heyer
www.ingeheyer.com

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Any planet that has at least one moon is potentially subject to experiencing eclipses. What form these eclipses take depends on the size(s) and the orbit(s) of the moon(s).


Star Trek, Voyager, Ex Post Facto, Lidell Ren

We have not seen any eclipses in the Star Trek Universe, though we do know they occur on worlds other than Earth. In the Voyager episode “Ex Post Facto,” Lidell Ren talks about an eclipse that she and her husband Professor Tolen Ren witnessed on his home planet Banea back in 2367. Banea has one moon, so in that sense the conditions are similar to ours here on Earth.

Here on Earth we experience two basic types of eclipses, lunar and solar. During both, the Earth and the Moon have to be exactly aligned with the Sun, so that the shadow of one body can hit the other. Our Moon orbits Earth inclined by about 5 degrees, which is why we don’t get eclipses regularly every month. Only when the line of intersection of the orbital planes of the Moon and the Earth (line of nodes) is directly aligned with the Sun can the shadows hit.

When the Earth’s shadow covers the Moon, we have a lunar eclipse. We actually had one just last night. If the Moon goes exactly through Earth shadow, it is a total lunar eclipse. As the Earth is much bigger than the Moon, the Moon can be covered entirely by Earth’s shadow, so everyone on the night side of Earth can see the eclipse.

When the Moon’s shadow hits the Earth, we have a solar eclipse. Since the Moon is much smaller than the Earth, its shadow is much smaller, and it only hits a small area on the Earth. But since Earth rotates around its axis, that spot marches across Earth’s surface. It so happens that the sizes and distances of Moon and Sun from Earth are such that the Moon can cover the Sun exactly. This is what we call a total solar eclipse. And it is a wondrous sight!

And why am I going on about this? As it turns out, this year, specifically on 21 August, the shadow of the Moon will travel across the United States from the Northwest to the Southeast. It has been dubbed the “Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017,” and it is a marvelous opportunity for everyone in the US to experience this unique phenomenon without having to join an expensive expedition. Everyone in the US is within a few hundred miles of the path of totality.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 1: The path of totality across the United States. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 2: This image shows in a bit more detail the areas the path of totality will traverse. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek, When the Sun Disappears

Figure 3: Some special places around the US are setting up public viewing spots along the path of totality. Source: Michael Zeiler, www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com.


Star Trek,When the Sun Disappears

Figure 4: A total solar eclipse. This is the only time you can see the corona of the Sun. Source: NASA.


Star Trek,When the Sun Disappears

Figure 5: The effects of a partial solar eclipse. The sunlight goes though the leaves to show an eclipse “ghost” (reflection). Source: Inge Heyer (Laramie, Wyoming, 20 May 2012).

NASA has made a video showing a simulation of the expected path of totality across the US. It has amazing detail and will help people find a good spot to observe the eclipse. The URL is shown below.

If you plan to travel to be in the path of totality, you might be disappointed to find out that all hotel rooms have been booked for months if not years. But friends managed to find a campground for an RV just the other day. So there are still opportunities to find a place to stay, but you have to act quickly, and you might need to be prepared to rough it.

Find yourself an area where you will be able to observe the Sun without anything in the way. Totality itself will be about 2 minutes and 40 seconds, but the partial concealment of the Sun on either side is also very interesting to watch.

There are many resources for you to inform yourself about this incredible natural phenomenon. The website for the Great American Eclipse is one, and of course NASA also has information available. Both URLs are given below. You can find out when exactly the eclipse will happen at the location you wish to travel to.

Now to the most important aspect of this endeavor: SAFETY! Do not ever look directly at the Sun! You will damage your eyes!

There are many ways to observe the Sun safely. You can make a basic pinhole camera to obtain a projection of the Sun’s image, you can use a mirror to project the Sun’s image onto a screen, you can use eclipse glasses which are available on the web, and you can use specialty filters for your camera (also available on the web and from your better photography specialty stores). Regular sun glasses are not enough! You need the special equipment mentioned here to do this safely.

I hope all of you will take this opportunity to see one of our world’s greatest natural phenomena.

Here are a few links for you if you’d like to know more about this topic.

The Great American Eclipse:
https://www.GreatAmericanEclipse.com

2017 Eclipse Across American through the Eyes of NASA:
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

The path of totality across the US (NASA video):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJgXaqW3md8

Memory Alpha:
http://en.memory-alpha.org

If you are interested in hearing more about the latest discoveries in the physical sciences and technology in a fannish setting, come visit us at Shore Leave next summer (7-9 July 2017). This fan-run convention features over 12 hours of science programming, in addition of course to all the usual con activities. One of our speakers from NASA will specifically talk about the 2017 Eclipse and how you can prepare yourself. For more information please visit www.shore-leave.com.

Inge Heyer
www.ingeheyer.com

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when-the-sun-disappears Wed, 15 Feb 2017 09:37:26 -0800