The antimatter universe's counterpart to the novae and supernovae of our positive-matter universe are known as "white holes." In contrast to novae, which are the explosions of dying stars in the positive-matter universe, white holes are already-dead stars that suddenly flare to life in the antimatter realm. The once-dead star Amphion (the antimatter counterpart of the Beta Niobe nova in the positive-matter universe), which abruptly "switched on" in the antimatter universe on stardate 6770.3 (2270), was an example of a "white hole."