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Raktajino

second.of.three

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Report this Sep. 29 2013, 11:46 am

The name given to Klingon coffee, namely raktajino, sounds suspiciously similar to the name of an Italian coffee beverage, cappucino. That got me to thinking, since this does not appear to be the way that the word coffee translates into the Klingon language, perhaps this is another running joke. Does anyone know the origin and history of this beverage, and is there a better explanation for the name than the one I've proffered?

stovokor2000-A

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POSTS: 2001

Report this Sep. 30 2013, 8:30 pm

when translating different languages, you might be suppries to find that translating the names of persons,places and things dont always match up with alphabet transfers.


 


for example translating the english Bread for the spanish Pan.


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miklamar

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Report this Oct. 06 2013, 6:52 am

Was raktajino a native Klingon beverage?  I thought they had adapted it from humans' coffee.  So, the similarity in the name could just be the Klingon's wanting to make it a little more linguistically appealing to them.


Var Miklama--Zakdorn, engineer. "A sound mind in a FULL body!" "Time, like latinum, is a limited quantity in the galaxy."

stovokor2000-A

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POSTS: 2001

Report this Oct. 06 2013, 10:34 am

[quote]


Was raktajino a native Klingon beverage?  I thought they had adapted it from humans' coffee.  So, the similarity in the name could just be the Klingon's wanting to make it a little more linguistically appealing to them.


and theres no way they would have tried to make it "linguistically appealing" to anyone, much less humans.doing so would be completly out of character.


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OtakuJo

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Report this Oct. 17 2013, 2:26 am

Quote: miklamar @ Oct. 06 2013, 6:52 am

>

>Was raktajino a native Klingon beverage?  I thought they had adapted it from humans' coffee.  So, the similarity in the name could just be the Klingon's wanting to make it a little more linguistically appealing to them.

>


Rather like the Icelandic efforts not to incorporate "borrowed words"?


Have you ever danced with a Tribble in the pale moonlight?

Pooneil

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POSTS: 1023

Report this Oct. 20 2013, 9:43 am

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Oct. 06 2013, 10:34 am

>

>

>Was raktajino a native Klingon beverage?  I thought they had adapted it from humans' coffee.  So, the similarity in the name could just be the Klingon's wanting to make it a little more linguistically appealing to them.

>and theres no way they would have tried to make it "linguistically appealing" to anyone, much less humans.doing so would be completly out of character.

>


The Klingons wanted to make it "linguistically appealing" to them, i.e. the Klingons, is what miklamar was saying.


The Spanish "pan" derives from Latin, while the English "bread" has Germanic roots. Totally unrelated.


"Raktajino" was probably the writers' attempt to create a word that would sound coffee-like to most viewers, while not sounding too familiar. Getting "rakt" from "capp" doesn't make much etymological sense to me -- but the similarity is definitely what the writers were going for.


On a related note, I once read some fan-made recipe for raktajino (in a Star Trek magazine, maybe) that made it sound very sweet. I would have expected Klingon coffee to be thick and bitter.

stovokor2000-A

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POSTS: 2001

Report this Oct. 20 2013, 9:59 am

Quote: Pooneil @ Oct. 20 2013, 9:43 am

>The Spanish "pan" derives from Latin, while the English "bread" has Germanic roots. Totally unrelated.


none of which is relevent to the point I was trying to make.


 


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Pooneil

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Report this Oct. 20 2013, 3:40 pm

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Oct. 20 2013, 9:59 am

Quote: Pooneil @ Oct. 20 2013, 9:43 am

>

>The Spanish "pan" derives from Latin, while the English "bread" has Germanic roots. Totally unrelated.

none of which is relevent to the point I was trying to make.

 


Okay. What was the point you were trying to make? The OP suggested that "raktajino" was a Klingonization of the Italian "cappucino", based on some similar sounds. I'm a little confused how completely foreign words like "pan" and "bread" enter into it. Neither one is an adaptation of the other, which seems tangential to the OP's idea as I understood it.

stovokor2000-A

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POSTS: 2001

Report this Oct. 20 2013, 6:59 pm

Quote: Pooneil @ Oct. 20 2013, 3:40 pm

>

>Okay. What was the point you were trying to make?The OP suggested that "raktajino" was a Klingonization of the Italian "cappucino", based on some similar sounds. I'm a little confused how completely foreign words like "pan" and "bread" enter into it. Neither one is an adaptation of the other, which seems tangential to the OP's idea as I understood it.

>
they might not be adaptaions of each outer, but 1 does translate into the others language.And thats my point "TRANSLATION"


the op commented on how "raktajino" did not appear to be the way that the word coffee would translates into the Klingon language,.............my point was that a translation of the letters in the word itself would not be the way to translate the language.


 


 


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miklamar

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Report this Oct. 25 2013, 11:45 pm

As you say, stovokor2000-A, if a language doesn't have certain letters, or if they don't usually go together that same way, the word gets changed.  I've heard Japanese adds a vowel between consonants, when tranliterating European languages into Japanese, like someone said they change "stamp" to "satampa," or something like that.


That's like when you look at a language whose alphabet/characters are unintelligible to you, you have trouble learning it.  But, if someone provides you with a good transliteration for it (into your language's characters), then it's much easier to learn it.  I noticed that especially with Near Eastern languages I've tried to learn and Asian languages I've looked at.


But, for some reason, trying to speak Russian--even when you hear how the words are supposed to be spoken--I could not get the correct pronunciation. (Klingon reminds me of Russian.)


 And, when my mother tried to speak a French phrase, it came out sounding Chinese!  I never figured that one out, but it's true!


Var Miklama--Zakdorn, engineer. "A sound mind in a FULL body!" "Time, like latinum, is a limited quantity in the galaxy."

Anime Odo

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Report this Oct. 28 2013, 10:54 pm

Well I do not think that I would drink a Raktigino.  Odo has Rugalian Tea, so I would just order that.


"I don't believe in luck, but I appreciate the sentiment." - Odo

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