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Is Trekkie-ism comparable to a religion?

alexander.penn

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 5:03 am

Hi guys!


My name's Alexander Penn, I'm a freelance journalist from London, UK. I'm doing a feature on film based religions like Dudeism and Jediism, and I wanted to talk about the Trekkie fandom. 


Of course, being a Trekkie isn't a religious pursuit, but I was wondering whether you guys think it's like one. Is it a lifestyle choice? Are there particular rituals you enjoy doing? Do any episodes effect your view of the world?


Would love to hear from you guys - name's won't be usedif you don't want them to. 


All the best guys, look forward to reading your responses


Alex P

bunkey

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POSTS: 686

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 5:21 am

Before anyone answers any questions...do you have credentials? Website? Kickstarter? Previous works?

alexander.penn

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 5:24 am

Sure - I study Newspaper Journalism at City University. My Twitter's @xand21 and my blog www.pennreview.wordpress.com (CV and Cuttings there in 'About'). This won't be published for now - it's for an assignment. But, would love to hear from you guys. 


Alex P

bunkey

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 686

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 5:44 am

Cool.


 


Personally I don't  view Star Trek fandom as a religion.  Gene Roddenberry was an athiest and disliked organized religions and focused the series on expanding your mind with science. Religion was specifically excluded from TOS and TNG.  (Which is one reason why I think he would have had a huge problem with the religious tones of DS9). In TOS, every time they ran into a civilization that worshipped a god, it was always debunked with a scientific explanation.  In TNG, the one god-like being, Q, is kind of a jerk, lol. Even the Klingon legends say that Klingons killed their gods because they were too much trouble.  I think when people start viewing something on a religious level, trouble begins.


"I think it's better to have ideas. You can change an idea. Changing a belief is trickier. Life should malleable and progressive; working from idea to idea permits that. Beliefs anchor you to certain points and limit growth; new ideas can't generate. Life becomes stagnant." -Dogma


For me, Star Trek expanded my world view. It taught me from a very young age that we are all equal. It taught me to look beyond the surface.  I don't participate in any rituals (but there are plenty of Klingon fans that do, lol).  But some of my favorite philosophical quotes come from Star Trek:


"You're a great one for logic. I'm a great one for rushing in where angels fear to tread. We're both extremists. Reality is probably somewhere in between." -James T. Kirk


"Let me help." A hundred years or so from now, I believe, a famous novelist will write a classic using that theme. He'll recommend those three words even over "I love you." -City On The Edge Of Forever


"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life." Captain Picard to Data.


These are quotes that have stayed with me and I sometimes use them as a guide. Star Trek really encourages people to think for themselves so my opinion is that it is definitely NOT a comparable to a religion.  


 

Trenchcoat_Ozz

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 32

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 9:43 am

Quote: bunkey @ Jun. 16 2013, 5:44 am

>

>Cool.

>Personally I don't  view Star Trek fandom as a religion.  Gene Roddenberry was an athiest and disliked organized religions and focused the series on expanding your mind with science. Religion was specifically excluded from TOS and TNG.  (Which is one reason why I think he would have had a huge problem with the religious tones of DS9). In TOS, every time they ran into a civilization that worshipped a god, it was always debunked with a scientific explanation.  In TNG, the one god-like being, Q, is kind of a jerk, lol. Even the Klingon legends say that Klingons killed their gods because they were too much trouble.  I think when people start viewing something on a religious level, trouble begins.

>"I think it's better to have ideas. You can change an idea. Changing a belief is trickier. Life should malleable and progressive; working from idea to idea permits that. Beliefs anchor you to certain points and limit growth; new ideas can't generate. Life becomes stagnant." -Dogma

>For me, Star Trek expanded my world view. It taught me from a very young age that we are all equal. It taught me to look beyond the surface.  I don't participate in any rituals (but there are plenty of Klingon fans that do, lol).  But some of my favorite philosophical quotes come from Star Trek:

>"You're a great one for logic. I'm a great one for rushing in where angels fear to tread. We're both extremists. Reality is probably somewhere in between." -James T. Kirk

>"Let me help." A hundred years or so from now, I believe, a famous novelist will write a classic using that theme. He'll recommend those three words even over "I love you." -City On The Edge Of Forever

>"It is possible to commit no mistakes and still lose. That is not a weakness. That is life." Captain Picard to Data.

>These are quotes that have stayed with me and I sometimes use them as a guide. Star Trek really encourages people to think for themselves so my opinion is that it is definitely NOT a comparable to a religion.  

>


 


I concur with Bunkey.  I don't consider being a Star Trek fan a religion, but with the franchise there is a certain idea accepted among the fandom at large -- "Infinite diversity in infinite combinations."  With a few individual exceptions, most of the fans believe and follow that idea.  So, it could be argued that Trek fandom is maybe a philosophy in the sense that it gave fans that idea and many, MANY have based their lives around it; but since there is no worship or theology to it, to call it a religion would be inaccurate in my opinion.


"Sincerely, I.M. Fletcher. PS Have a nice day."

heronymous

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 155

Report this Jun. 16 2013, 4:10 pm

I disagree with Bunkey and T_Ozz ! I believe Trekkism has religious connotations equated with the future , intelligence and equality ! Star Trek was Gene Roddenberry's exploration of ourselves and our future . It is true that Gene hated religion , but he was looking for ways to make the world a better place . And it is true that Christians and Muslims can be counted alongside the mass murderers . Just look at the last 10 years of conflict . I believe that's criteria enough for a new religion . And I believe the creative Spirit is in that ! 


 

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