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first impressions of Deep Space Nine

Utopia Planetia

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POSTS: 88

Report this Jul. 21 2013, 4:59 pm

When it's over, you won't want it to end. Like some others here, I was a next generation fan as a kid and couldn't understand a star trek show without a ship. But 15, 20 years later, deep space nine wins hands down. It really is the star trek for grown ups -- at least moreso than the others. Also, as you said, the production values and stories hold up well and have a timeless quality none of the other series match. Enterprise has a few stand alone episodes that hold up. But even voyager looks dated when watching today.


Did you ever go back and watch the 1st episode? I'm almost certian the full episode is included in that 'part 1' link.

KelisThePoet

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POSTS: 636

Report this Jul. 21 2013, 6:21 pm

Yes, a week or so after I started watching, my sister figured out that the entire first episode was available through the "part 1" link and alerted me to the fact.  So I went back and watched it.  I enjoyed it, though I'm glad the trick of moving the station through space so quickly is a deus ex machina the writers have not used again (so far).


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

KelisThePoet

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POSTS: 636

Report this Jul. 21 2013, 6:23 pm

Quote: tony.starks.7524 @ Jul. 21 2013, 1:13 am

>Kelis the Poet-

>Go read my latest post on a similar thread just above this one. I'm now up to Season 6. And trust me, you will be HOOKED!

>We have very similar stories me and you, experiences with Trek and stuff. DS9 only gets better over time. Unlike the other Trek shows, DS9's last couple of seasons are the best.
I saw that thread, but decided I'd better not look too close, for fear of spoilers, since I don't seem to be as far along as you are--even though I already feel hooked by this show and am now to the point that I watch it with every free moment I get.


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

Utopia Planetia

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 88

Report this Jul. 21 2013, 8:55 pm

Quote: KelisThePoet @ Jul. 21 2013, 6:21 pm

>

>Yes, a week or so after I started watching, my sister figured out that the entire first episode was available through the "part 1" link and alerted me to the fact.  So I went back and watched it.  I enjoyed it, though I'm glad the trick of moving the station through space so quickly is a deus ex machina the writers have not used again (so far).

>


Yea. Part of the reason ds9 doesn't rely on those kinds of tricks as much as the other series (next generation's 2-part ship splitting and magic robot man Data who can fix a 10 hour problem in 10 seconds -- a ship in a voyager episode even split into THREE parts once) is because deep space nine isn't actually a futuristic show. It happens to be set a few hundred years from today, but it could've been set in almost any time and any place without upsetting the integrity of the story. Even Odo's impersonations aren't use to fix prolbems as much as uncover them after a while. In later seasons, practically the only trick they're left with is the ferengis' hyperperceptive ears. So yea, on the few occasions they use those kinds of tricks in the show, it's jarring in a way it never is in the other series, save perhaps enterprise.

KelisThePoet

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 636

Report this Jul. 23 2013, 12:04 pm

I'm not that concerned about the unrealistic implausibility of zipping the station around.  It is implausible, but so are transporters, universal translators, Romulan warships powered by singularities and sentient slugs living in people's stomachs.


I was more bothered by the station zipping around as a violation of Deep Space Nine's own apparent premise and fictional rules.  Whenever writers use near-miraculous technological solutions to do an end around a show's premise, they either need to change the premise forever to fit the new miraculous technology (as was the case with the Doctor's mobile emitter in Voyager), or else you find yourself wondering why the characters don't resort to the technological shortcut more often. (transwarp beaming, anyone?)


In the case of Deep Space Nine, I think it's a cool and challenging premise to limit the stories around a station that's, well, stationary.  So I'm glad that with the exception of the pilot, the writers have stuck with that premise--though the once nearly defenseless station ripping a Klingon fleet to shreds at the end of "Way of the Warrior" was not my favorite moment of the series so far, either.


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

Anime Odo

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POSTS: 209

Report this Jul. 28 2013, 8:10 pm

 I am glad to hear that you like Odo!  Have you seen Batman Forever? because he shows up at the end as Dr. Burton


"I don't believe in luck, but I appreciate the sentiment." - Odo

kkt

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POSTS: 170

Report this Aug. 27 2013, 10:46 pm

The station was near-defenseless in seasons 1 and 2.  At the end of season 2, Sisko is saying "... we will be ready for them!".  Assume from that moment on, Starfleet is working hard to beef up the station's shields and weapons, so by season 4 it's a formidable challenge to the Klingons.


 

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