ATTENTION: The Boards will be closed permanently on May 28th, 2014. Posting will be disabled on April 28th, 2014. More Info

What's your favorite species introduced or shown on Enterprise?

guillermo.mejía

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2852

Report this Mar. 02 2012, 4:11 pm

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>It started with the disagreement if Vulcans in the Enterprise series were more emotional than any other Star Trek series.

>
Not exactly. They had a more prominent role so it's easy to assume that. We've seen Tuvok, Spock, Sybok and Saavik all have emotional breakdowns at one point or another.


What I think ENT did do that shook many people is that they protrayed the Vulcans in a very negative light at first, having them be hypocrites, and prejudiced. However it works weel when the ENT evolution of Vulcans in ENT comes to a head with the discovery of the original teachings of Surak. The fact that a human helped them retun to their lost ways also shines on light on why humans and Vulcans are such good allies.


I didn't like their portrayel at first, but with time it makes a whole lot more sense.


"Aye. And if my grandmother had wheels she'd be a wagon." - Scotty, The Miracle Worker since 2265.

cowgirlcadet

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 788

Report this Mar. 02 2012, 4:56 pm

I think the original question was "What's your favorite species on Enterprise?". So far I've got a three-way split between Vulcans, Andorians and Beagles.

stovokor2000-A

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2001

Report this Mar. 02 2012, 8:09 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 02 2012, 3:53 pm

>"We may yet prevail.  That's a conceit, but a healthy one."  Picard discussing facing the Borg.  He believed there was a chance, but he did not lie to himself to convince himself that they would definitely defeat the Borg.


Believing you have a "CHANCE" is a far thing then being certin/believing you "WILL" succeed in your mission.


In a tactical game, my opponent had managed to give himself a substantial advantage, and was confident he would defeat me.  Under the circumstances, he should have, and was doing well early on.  If he hadn't made mistakes & if I hadn't pulled some highly unconventional tactics, his prediction would have been an understatement of how badly he would have beaten me.  He didn't lie to himself just because I ended up winning.


Same as above.A game of chances.


 


Photobucket

Broadstorm

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 828

Report this Mar. 03 2012, 3:30 am

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 02 2012, 8:09 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 02 2012, 3:53 pm

>

>"We may yet prevail.  That's a conceit, but a healthy one."  Picard discussing facing the Borg.  He believed there was a chance, but he did not lie to himself to convince himself that they would definitely defeat the Borg.

Believing you have a "CHANCE" is a far thing then being certin/believing you "WILL" succeed in your mission.

In a tactical game, my opponent had managed to give himself a substantial advantage, and was confident he would defeat me.  Under the circumstances, he should have, and was doing well early on.  If he hadn't made mistakes & if I hadn't pulled some highly unconventional tactics, his prediction would have been an understatement of how badly he would have beaten me.  He didn't lie to himself just because I ended up winning.

Same as above.A game of chances.

 


My point is that there is a difference between a reasonable amount of confidence and delusion.  One can have a reasonable expectation a desirable outcome without being delusional about it.  People expand their limits by pushing them.  By your argument that there is apparently no difference between confidence & delusion, do you contend that everyone who pushs their limits is constantly lying to themselves if they don't improve as quickly as they hope?

stovokor2000-A

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2001

Report this Mar. 03 2012, 11:09 am

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 03 2012, 3:30 am

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 02 2012, 8:09 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 02 2012, 3:53 pm

>

>

>"We may yet prevail.  That's a conceit, but a healthy one."  Picard discussing facing the Borg.  He believed there was a chance, but he did not lie to himself to convince himself that they would definitely defeat the Borg.

Believing you have a "CHANCE" is a far thing then being certin/believing you "WILL" succeed in your mission.

In a tactical game, my opponent had managed to give himself a substantial advantage, and was confident he would defeat me.  Under the circumstances, he should have, and was doing well early on.  If he hadn't made mistakes & if I hadn't pulled some highly unconventional tactics, his prediction would have been an understatement of how badly he would have beaten me.  He didn't lie to himself just because I ended up winning.

Same as above.A game of chances.

 

My point is that there is a difference between a reasonable amount of confidence and delusion.  One can have a reasonable expectation a desirable outcome without being delusional about it.  People expand their limits by pushing them.  By your argument that there is apparently no difference between confidence & delusion, do you contend that everyone who pushs their limits is constantly lying to themselves if they don't improve as quickly as they hope?

no, but I do contend that those that claim/are certin they will complete a task when theres more thrn enough reason to doubt the outcome is being delusion


Photobucket

Broadstorm

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 828

Report this Mar. 03 2012, 3:24 pm

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 03 2012, 11:09 am

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 03 2012, 3:30 am

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 02 2012, 8:09 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 02 2012, 3:53 pm

>

>

>

>"We may yet prevail.  That's a conceit, but a healthy one."  Picard discussing facing the Borg.  He believed there was a chance, but he did not lie to himself to convince himself that they would definitely defeat the Borg.

Believing you have a "CHANCE" is a far thing then being certin/believing you "WILL" succeed in your mission.

In a tactical game, my opponent had managed to give himself a substantial advantage, and was confident he would defeat me.  Under the circumstances, he should have, and was doing well early on.  If he hadn't made mistakes & if I hadn't pulled some highly unconventional tactics, his prediction would have been an understatement of how badly he would have beaten me.  He didn't lie to himself just because I ended up winning.

Same as above.A game of chances.

 

My point is that there is a difference between a reasonable amount of confidence and delusion.  One can have a reasonable expectation a desirable outcome without being delusional about it.  People expand their limits by pushing them.  By your argument that there is apparently no difference between confidence & delusion, do you contend that everyone who pushs their limits is constantly lying to themselves if they don't improve as quickly as they hope?

no, but I do contend that those that claim/are certin they will complete a task when theres more thrn enough reason to doubt the outcome is being delusion


I never stated otherwise, but your use of absolutes rather than shades of gray says that if someone thinks they are up to a challenge, but end up falling short then they must have been lying to themselves. In the original example, but simply misjudged himself.  Are you calling him delusional?  On what do you base your claim that there was more than enough reason to doubt the desired outcome?


Have you ever misjudged your ability (better or worse) to perform a certain task or have you always done EXACTLY as you expected?  If so, did you lie to yourself, or simply not have enough information on which to base your assessment?

stovokor2000-A

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2001

Report this Mar. 03 2012, 8:31 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 03 2012, 3:24 pm

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 03 2012, 11:09 am

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 03 2012, 3:30 am

Quote: stovokor2000-A @ Mar. 02 2012, 8:09 pm

Quote: Broadstorm @ Mar. 02 2012, 3:53 pm

>

>

>

>

>"We may yet prevail.  That's a conceit, but a healthy one."  Picard discussing facing the Borg.  He believed there was a chance, but he did not lie to himself to convince himself that they would definitely defeat the Borg.

Believing you have a "CHANCE" is a far thing then being certin/believing you "WILL" succeed in your mission.

In a tactical game, my opponent had managed to give himself a substantial advantage, and was confident he would defeat me.  Under the circumstances, he should have, and was doing well early on.  If he hadn't made mistakes & if I hadn't pulled some highly unconventional tactics, his prediction would have been an understatement of how badly he would have beaten me.  He didn't lie to himself just because I ended up winning.

Same as above.A game of chances.

 

My point is that there is a difference between a reasonable amount of confidence and delusion.  One can have a reasonable expectation a desirable outcome without being delusional about it.  People expand their limits by pushing them.  By your argument that there is apparently no difference between confidence & delusion, do you contend that everyone who pushs their limits is constantly lying to themselves if they don't improve as quickly as they hope?

no, but I do contend that those that claim/are certin they will complete a task when theres more thrn enough reason to doubt the outcome is being delusion

I never stated otherwise, but your use of absolutes rather than shades of gray says that if someone thinks they are up to a challenge, but end up falling short then they must have been lying to themselves. In the original example, but simply misjudged himself.  Are you calling him delusional?  On what do you base your claim that there was more than enough reason to doubt the desired outcome?

Have you ever misjudged your ability (better or worse) to perform a certain task or have you always done EXACTLY as you expected?  If so, did you lie to yourself, or simply not have enough information on which to base your assessment?

More offten then not, I do better then I expected.............but thats mostly because I always underestemate my abilities/skills/chances.


In the case with Sarek, I see no logical reason he should have been so confedent.His doctors told him he was ill, he was smart enough to fully understand what his doctors told him.


If he was trully sure he could still get the job done, with the info he was given, then he was letting his pride take over, or he was liying to himself


Photobucket

TNG=culture

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 329

Report this Mar. 04 2012, 5:43 am

The Time Travler

Broadstorm

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 828

Report this Mar. 04 2012, 5:45 am

Quote: TNG=culture @ Mar. 04 2012, 5:43 am

>

>The Time Travler

>


Do you mean Daniels, the one using the Suliban, or the ones manipulating the Xindi?

Mattyum

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 12

Report this Mar. 08 2012, 4:25 pm

Hey whats up! iI just got here and i like vulcans better.


 

Mattyum

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 12

Report this Mar. 08 2012, 5:02 pm

Has anybody heard of the Enterprise-J


 

Mitchz95

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 1830

Report this Mar. 08 2012, 5:05 pm

Quote: Mattyum @ Mar. 08 2012, 5:02 pm

>

>Has anybody heard of the Enterprise-J

>


Yes. It was in service in the 26th century, and participated in the Battle of Procyon-V. Some of its crew were Xindi. Archer and Daniels visited it in "Azati Prime".


"The future is in the hands of those who explore... And from all the beauty they discover while crossing perpetually receding frontiers, they develop for nature and for humankind an infinite love." - Jacques Yves Cousteau

tripsmyguy2

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 26

Report this Mar. 16 2012, 10:49 pm

Andorians and Aenar


"...open your mind to new possibilities." Trip Tucker, ENT, The Catwalk

Recently logged in

Users browsing this forum: DS9TREK, FleetAdmiral_BamBam, Drunkin Druid

Forum Permissions

You cannot post new topics in this forum

You cannot reply to topics in this forum

You cannot delete posts in this forum