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greatest cross over scene in trek

OtakuJo

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POSTS: 16362

Report this Nov. 25 2011, 5:57 pm

Quote: guillermo.mejía @ Nov. 25 2011, 5:33 pm

>

>Probably DS9's Trials and Tribble-ations, the scene where Sisko and Dax are watching Spock and Kirk on the comm and Dax comments on Spock's looks.

>


Oh yes. Practically any scene in T&T !! And I even got action figures and novel from that episode. Why did I not think of that?


I like the one with Bashir and O'Brien in the line-up best! And then later, O'Brien says, "I lied to Captain Kirk."


Have you ever danced with a Tribble in the pale moonlight?

Medic_1849

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Report this Nov. 25 2011, 7:14 pm

^^


Totally forgot about Trials and Tribble-ations. My new favourite cross-over is O'Brien and Bashir in the line-up getting grilled by Captain Kirk.


 


 

267198ed

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Report this Nov. 25 2011, 7:16 pm

Oh my! How did I not remember Trials and Tribble-ations!? Hands down the best cross over in television history.


Jolan Tru, may your day be filled with peace.

KelisThePoet

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Report this Nov. 26 2011, 8:49 pm

Quote: Vger23 @ Nov. 25 2011, 3:49 pm

Quote: KelisThePoet @ Nov. 25 2011, 11:41 am

>Am I the only one who really disliked McCoy's cameo in "Encounter at Farpoint"?  I felt like it added nothing to the plot.  It had nothing to do with the rest of the events in the episode.  It was as though the writers realized they needed to tie their new series back to the great and popular original one but had no idea how to do that, so they just clumsily stitched in a scene with an original series actor talking about how great the Enterprise is.

>I didn't understand how McCoy could have lived that long, and I thought it was sad to see the great character as a shrivelled old man with barely a breath of life in him, but I could have accepted and even embraced those fictional plot points if they had indeed been crucial and beneficial to the story's plot.
Why is it hard to understand? People live to be over 100 fairly commonly now in the early 21st century. Why is it hard to believe that live spans would continue to advance 350 years in the future...especially for a brilliant doctor who probably knows how to take care of himself?

[shrugs] I don't buy the premise that just because our improved medicine has prolonged human lifespans that therefore better medicine will continue to prolong human lifespans indefinitely longer.  It seems to me that there should be a biological limit.  But what do I know?  I'm no doctor.  As I wrote in my initial post on this subject, I wouldn't have minded this challenge to my personal notions of realism if it had been in the service of a good story, which I don't think it was.


And I also just personally find the idea creepy of humans indefinitely prolonging their lives or prolonging them a great deal longer than we prolong our lives without a corresponding extension of human health and vitality over a greater number of years.  McCoy's shrivelled appearance reminded me of the part of Gulliver's Travels in which Gulliver visits an island of people who live forever, but they also age forever, so they've all become these terrifying walking corpses.


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

OtakuJo

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Report this Nov. 26 2011, 9:52 pm

Quote: KelisThePoet @ Nov. 26 2011, 8:49 pm

>

>McCoy's shrivelled appearance reminded me of the part of Gulliver's Travels in which Gulliver visits an island of people who live forever, but they also age forever, so they've all become these terrifying walking corpses.

>


The Struldbrugs?


He does have kind of that appearance about him. I don't think he's living forever though, just a very long time -- It's more of a natural (logical) extension of the increased longevity of humans in our own century.


Have you ever danced with a Tribble in the pale moonlight?

TheDriver

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Report this Nov. 27 2011, 12:11 am

Obviously, my favorite is "Trials and Tribble-ations"...


And I'm admittedly not a huge VOY fan...


But if you assume Captain Proton is a cross between Commander Cody and Flash Gordon?


Then "Bride of Chaotica!" would be my favorite crossover.



"Smoke me a kipper. I'll be back for breakfast."

KelisThePoet

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Report this Nov. 28 2011, 1:55 pm

Quote: OtakuJo @ Nov. 26 2011, 9:52 pm

Quote: KelisThePoet @ Nov. 26 2011, 8:49 pm

>McCoy's shrivelled appearance reminded me of the part of Gulliver's Travels in which Gulliver visits an island of people who live forever, but they also age forever, so they've all become these terrifying walking corpses.
The Struldbrugs?

He does have kind of that appearance about him. I don't think he's living forever though, just a very long time -- It's more of a natural (logical) extension of the increased longevity of humans in our own century.


Sure, I don't think the implication was that he'll live forever--just saying there's an analogous creepiness--although the lack of clarity as to why McCoy is living that long or how long he will live is another thing I don't like about the scene.  Because the scene is not a major plot point, audiences never find out why McCoy is still around, which makes the whole thing feel all the more disjointed.  Perhaps the implication was supposed to be that many people live that long in the 24th century, so there was no need to comment on McCoy's longevity, but that's not evident to the audience even if it is evident to the other characters, and it's not like there are any other shrivelled old guys wandering around.  Trek usually does a better job of setting up and explaining how the future is different from the present (transporters, no money, & c., & c.)


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

SeptuagintXXX

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Report this Nov. 28 2011, 2:50 pm

The reason why the scene where Sisko talks to Picard is so great is because it shows how different the officers are, and by extension, how different the two shows will be.  The Enterprise was the flag ship of starfleet, and had the best crew, and the most accomplished captain. Seven years of TNG spoiled us.  The meeting between Sisko and Picard showed us, the audience that there's a whole different world in the Star Trek- starfleet universe, where the Enterprise and it's legendary captain, either Kirk or Picard, arent' always rushing in to save the day.  It's a grittier, angrier world in DS9, and Sisko personified the transition. 

OtakuJo

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Report this Nov. 30 2011, 5:27 am

Quote: KelisThePoet @ Nov. 28 2011, 1:55 pm

>

>Sure, I don't think the implication was that he'll live forever--just saying there's an analogous creepiness--although the lack of clarity as to why McCoy is living that long or how long he will live is another thing I don't like about the scene.

>


But have you ever seen pictures of some real super-centennarians?


Have you ever danced with a Tribble in the pale moonlight?

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