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Zero new jobs created in August; that hasn't happened since 1945

Mirror Founder

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 327

Report this Sep. 02 2011, 7:54 am

http://www.cnbc.com/id/44370439


The US economy created no jobs and the unemployment rate held steadily higher at 9.1 percent in August, fueling concerns that the US is heading for another recession.


It was the first time since World War II that the economy had precisely net zero jobs created for a month.


Economists had been expecting the report to show a net of 75,000 jobs created, an unusually low number considering the US is technically more than two years removed from the end of the last recession.


Stocks sold off sharply following the report, while bond prices rose and the US dollar fell nearly 2 percent against the Swiss franc.


Markets had been closely watching the August report in hopes that the employment picture would begin to show signs of recovery.


Stocks have slumped more than 10 percent since the beginning of May as concerns grew that the debt and deficit problem was beginning to overwhelm hopes of a recovery following the depths of the financial crisis in 2008 and 2009.


Private payrolls actually rose 17,000, but that was offset by continued shrinkage in government. The number of people unemployed remained unchanged at 14 million.


It was a dismal way to kick off the Labor Day weekend when Americans are supposed to be celebrating work, not bemoaning the lack of it.


"We're in this very flattish-type phase," said Liz Ann Sonders, chief market strategist at Charles Schwab in San Francisco. "The only relatively good news, and I would emphasize 'relatively,' is we're not in firing mode, not in a job-loss mode. We're in an extraordinarily slow job-gain mode."


The unemployment rate that counts those not looking for work rose to 16.2 percent, tied for the highest in 2011.


The numbers could have been even worse.


The government's birth-death model, which approximates the amount of businesses created and lost during the month, added 87,000 jobs.


The average duration of unemployment edged lower to 40.3 weeks from its previous record high of 40.4 weeks in July. However, the median level spiked from 21.2 to 21.8 weeks.


Among the more disturbing numbers: the amount of people "marginally attached to the labor force" rose to 2.6 million from 2.4 million. These are workers not included in the unemployment count because they had not sought work in the past four weeks but have looked in the past year.


Health care and mining saw more jobs in the month, but telecommunications and government both posted substantial losses. It was unclear how much impact the Verizon strike, where 45,000 walked off their jobs for two weeks, had on the total count. Many of those workers likely received paychecks during the Labor Department's counting period and may not be included in the number released Friday.


Manufacturing lost 3,000 jobs, construction dropped 5,000 and retail lost 8,000.


President Obama is set to deliver a speech to Congress on Thursday that will outline the administration's jobs plan as the 2012 election nears.


"There are things that we know work that are waiting for action by the Congress," US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis told CNBC.


"I do believe that we're going in the right direction, but we need cooperation and it begins with members of the House and the Senate agreeing to do something now," she added.


At the same time, the Federal Reserve [cnbc explains] has expanded its balance sheet past the $2.5 trillion mark through monetary easing measures geared at boosting spending.


However, the economy remains mired at 1 percent growth, and a report this week showed manufacturing edging towards contraction levels.


"Jobs creation remains weak, because temporary tax cuts, stimulus spending, large federal deficits, expensive and ineffective business regulations, and increased health care mandates and costs do not address structural problems holding back dynamic growth and jobs creation—the huge trade deficit and dysfunctional energy policies," Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland, said in an analysis.


The report also showed that job creation in July, which originally came in better than expected, actually wasn't as good as thought. The 117,000 jobs originally announced was cut to 85,000, while June's number fell from 46,000 to a mere 20,000. That makes four consecutive months of sub-100,000 job growth when most economists believe that 150,000 is the minimum number needed to reduce the unemployment rate meaningfully.


"Though much attention is being paid to ‘zero job growth’ in August, the real news in today’s numbers is that job growth is worse than in recent months, and the nation continues to produce far fewer jobs than needed to meaningfully reduce the unemployment rate," Heidi Shierholz, economist at the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., said in a statement. "In fact, in some ways the report was less than zero in that weekly hours fell, as did hourly earnings."


Average hourly earnings slid 3 cents to $23.09 while average weekly hours edged lower to 34.2.


Unemployment rates held steady across the major categories, with whites at 8.9 percent, Hispanics at 11.3 percent and blacks at 16.7 percent. The rate for women is a comparatively low 8.0 percent.


There were 331,000 more people working in August than July. But 430,000 more were in the category of working part-time for economic reasons.

Ayko

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 591

Report this Sep. 02 2011, 7:59 am

Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!


I always like a challenging challenge.

Corwin8

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 8468

Report this Sep. 02 2011, 9:44 am

Quote: Ayko @ Sep. 02 2011, 7:59 am

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>


 


What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 


Let the bridges I burn light the way. You are special, just like everybody else. Calling an illegal alien an ‘undocumented immigrant’ is like calling a drug dealer an ‘unlicensed pharmacist’

Mirror Founder

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 327

Report this Sep. 02 2011, 10:31 am

Quote: Ayko @ Sep. 02 2011, 7:59 am

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>


 


Read the second sentence in the article. "Net Zero."

caltrek2

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2654

Report this Sep. 03 2011, 5:38 am

Quote: Corwin8 @ Sep. 02 2011, 9:44 am

Quote: Ayko @ Sep. 02 2011, 7:59 am

>

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>

 

What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 


...and where are the jobs being lost.?


Why, in the government sector.


I thought that is what conservatives like you and Founder wanted to see?


As Americans, we sometimes suffer from too much pluribus and not enough unum. - Arthur Schelsinger, Jr.

caltrek2

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2654

Report this Sep. 03 2011, 6:09 am

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>Americans {People} need to stop relying on the government to create new jobs, that's what business school is for. America is the land of the free, the home of the brave, we are not China with a billion manufacturing plants, apparently we are the land of Concepts.

>


Well, conceptually speaking, are things going according to plan, or aren't they?


As Americans, we sometimes suffer from too much pluribus and not enough unum. - Arthur Schelsinger, Jr.

caltrek2

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2654

Report this Sep. 03 2011, 6:45 am

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>we have one of thee best human rights and civil liberties in the world.

>we have a system where if we fall down we can go on food stamps and buy food, we have cloths and fresh water to drink..really what more do we need without having to fear whether we are going to be starving in some third world country were they don't even have the basic necessities to scrap off of? Do we really have to cry about everything thing that goes wrong? Do you really need two pairs of shoes? Do you really need extra batteries? Do you really need so much cloths, are whole industry is made of consumption, face it we don't need that much and until we are eating each other we shouldn't cry.

>


I notice that your post count is rather low. So first of all, let me welcome you to the boards. New blood is always appreciated. At least by me.


Yes, we have a food stamp program here in the U.S. Problem is a lot of folks here seem to want such programs to come to an end. Reason, they don't want their taxes going to support such a program.


Ideologically, I support the food stamp program. There is a point a lot of conservatives make. That such programs foster too much dependency on the government. The alternative of allowing starvation is unacceptable to me.


Still, it reminds me of the old adage. You can give sombeody a fish to help them with  their immediate hunger, or you can teach them how to fish. In that sense, the food stamp program is inferior to other programs. Programs that teach people not to be continually reliant on government help are far better.


 


As Americans, we sometimes suffer from too much pluribus and not enough unum. - Arthur Schelsinger, Jr.

FleetAdmiral_BamBam

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 46303

Report this Sep. 03 2011, 6:19 pm

Quote: caltrek2 @ Sep. 03 2011, 6:09 am

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>

>Americans {People} need to stop relying on the government to create new jobs, that's what business school is for. America is the land of the free, the home of the brave, we are not China with a billion manufacturing plants, apparently we are the land of Concepts.

>

Well, conceptually speaking, are things going according to plan, or aren't they?

Fighting both the government and the economy makes it hard.


lnagr1

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 1403

Report this Sep. 04 2011, 2:10 am

well, that sucks.


Corwin8

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 8468

Report this Sep. 04 2011, 3:24 pm

Quote: caltrek2 @ Sep. 03 2011, 5:38 am

Quote: Corwin8 @ Sep. 02 2011, 9:44 am

Quote: Ayko @ Sep. 02 2011, 7:59 am

>

>

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>

 

What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 

...and where are the jobs being lost.?

Why, in the government sector.

I thought that is what conservatives like you and Founder wanted to see?


Thrilled, The more government jobs that are deemed non-essential that are cut down, are a start. The fact that the bloated government and thousands of useless government workers can't hit the street fast enough. Sadly the ones in government that are doing a good job will suffer as well. 


Less government, more unemployed government workers. I'm ok with that. Government workers, and I am oversimplifying it of course, are better paid and less skilled than their private sector counterparts. 


Let the bridges I burn light the way. You are special, just like everybody else. Calling an illegal alien an ‘undocumented immigrant’ is like calling a drug dealer an ‘unlicensed pharmacist’

Corwin8

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 8468

Report this Sep. 05 2011, 8:07 am

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>

>

>

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>

 

What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 

...and where are the jobs being lost.?

Why, in the government sector.

I thought that is what conservatives like you and Founder wanted to see?

Thrilled, The more government jobs that are deemed non-essential that are cut down, are a start. The fact that the bloated government and thousands of useless government workers can't hit the street fast enough. Sadly the ones in government that are doing a good job will suffer as well. 

Less government, more unemployed government workers. I'm ok with that. Government workers, and I am oversimplifying it of course, are better paid and less skilled than their private sector counterparts. 

   better paid but less skilled ?...   right .... what planet do you live on ? that'snot what happens here.


I live in Boston,MA. I am in countless state and federal offices all the time and a large majority of these people could not pour piss out of a boot with instructions printed on the heel. Yet they are better staffed, paid and compensated with benefits that the vast majority of the rest of us private sector employees. 


Let the bridges I burn light the way. You are special, just like everybody else. Calling an illegal alien an ‘undocumented immigrant’ is like calling a drug dealer an ‘unlicensed pharmacist’

DammitJim6200

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 6876

Report this Sep. 05 2011, 7:05 pm

 


Okay ALL OF YOU STOP THE STUPIDITY, Stop Blaming the government for everything, you want job ? get off your lazy a$$ and get one, Get ambitious, Network, get a skill, I've been laid off for 4 months, I got up, Network, Looking day and night, went for any Interview, and I got a better Job than I before, If you're HUNGRY WHAT DO YOU DO ? STARVE, GET HUNGRY AND GET A JOB, THE only people that won't get jobs is those without any skills, flip burgers until you find what you want.

Corwin8

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 8468

Report this Sep. 05 2011, 8:59 pm

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

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Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>

>

>

>

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>

 

What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 

...and where are the jobs being lost.?

Why, in the government sector.

I thought that is what conservatives like you and Founder wanted to see?

Thrilled, The more government jobs that are deemed non-essential that are cut down, are a start. The fact that the bloated government and thousands of useless government workers can't hit the street fast enough. Sadly the ones in government that are doing a good job will suffer as well. 

Less government, more unemployed government workers. I'm ok with that. Government workers, and I am oversimplifying it of course, are better paid and less skilled than their private sector counterparts. 

   better paid but less skilled ?...   right .... what planet do you live on ? that'snot what happens here.

I live in Boston,MA. I am in countless state and federal offices all the time and a large majority of these people could not pour piss out of a boot with instructions printed on the heel. Yet they are better staffed, paid and compensated with benefits that the vast majority of the rest of us private sector employees. 

Why am I having a lot or trouble believing your stereotypical ultra-right-wing unsuibstantiated and uncollaborated BS ?



Perhaps you are a ultra left wing, kool-aid drinking, wealth redistributing, big government, public school educated assclown. I have no idea. Want me to start posting the waste, fraud, and abuse in my state alone?

Let the bridges I burn light the way. You are special, just like everybody else. Calling an illegal alien an ‘undocumented immigrant’ is like calling a drug dealer an ‘unlicensed pharmacist’

Corwin8

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 8468

Report this Sep. 06 2011, 7:50 am

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

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Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

Quote: /view_profile/ @

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>Thats crap! The store I work in started a new supervising position for me and hired someone in my place, thats one new job right there!

>

 

What about the jobs lost and not rehired? It's a math thing. If you hire 5000 new people and the job market lost 5000 jobs somewhere else, that is a zero sum outcome. 

...and where are the jobs being lost.?

Why, in the government sector.

I thought that is what conservatives like you and Founder wanted to see?

Thrilled, The more government jobs that are deemed non-essential that are cut down, are a start. The fact that the bloated government and thousands of useless government workers can't hit the street fast enough. Sadly the ones in government that are doing a good job will suffer as well. 

Less government, more unemployed government workers. I'm ok with that. Government workers, and I am oversimplifying it of course, are better paid and less skilled than their private sector counterparts. 

   better paid but less skilled ?...   right .... what planet do you live on ? that'snot what happens here.

I live in Boston,MA. I am in countless state and federal offices all the time and a large majority of these people could not pour piss out of a boot with instructions printed on the heel. Yet they are better staffed, paid and compensated with benefits that the vast majority of the rest of us private sector employees. 

Why am I having a lot or trouble believing your stereotypical ultra-right-wing unsuibstantiated and uncollaborated BS ?

Perhaps you are a ultra left wing, kool-aid drinking, wealth redistributing, big government, public school educated assclown. I have no idea. Want me to start posting the waste, fraud, and abuse in my state alone?

If you had any real facts to support your stereotyping and ultra-right-wing BS you'd've provided it by now.   But keep the personal attacks coming, clearly that's all you are capable off.


 


Because I live to do your research. Stand by Sock Puppet.


 





Income angst? Not for public employees
By nyline:art">Jeff JacobyGlobe Columnist / January 27, 2010


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LAST MONTH, the US economy shed another 85,000 jobs. It marked a miserable end to a calamitous year in which an estimated 4.2 million American jobs were liquidated, and unemployment rose to 10 percent. In addition, more than 920,000 “discouraged workers’’ left the labor force entirely, having given up on finding work and therefore not included in official unemployment data.





 






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COMMENTS (181)







Meanwhile, millions of Americans who do have jobs have been compelled to work part-time or at reduced wages; many others have not seen a raise in years. But not everyone is having a rotten recession.




Since December 2007, when the current downturn began, the ranks of federal employees earning $100,000 and up has skyrocketed. According to a recent analysis by USA Today, federal workers making six-figure salaries - not including overtime and bonuses - “jumped from 14 percent to 19 percent of civil servants during the recession’s first 18 months.’’ The surge has been especially pronounced among the highest-paid employees. At the Defense Department, for example, the number of civilian workers making $150,000 or more quintupled from 1,868 to 10,100. At the recession’s start, the Transportation Department was paying only one person a salary of $170,000. Eighteen months later, 1,690 employees were drawing paychecks that size.




All the while, the federal government has been adding jobs at a 10,000-a-month clip. Between December 2007 and June 2009, federal payrolls exploded by nearly 10 percent. “Federal workers are enjoying an extraordinary boom time in pay and hiring,’’ USA Today observes, “during a recession that has cost 7.3 million jobs in the private sector.’’ And to add public-sector insult to private-sector injury, data from the Office of Personnel Management show the average federal salary is now roughly $71,000 - about 76 percent higher than the average private salary.




Needless to say, it isn’t only at the federal level that government pay and perks increasingly outstrip those in the private sector.




In Ohio, a joint reporting effort by the state’s eight largest newspapers found that even in a time of severe budget cuts, “one expense government leaders have not cut is pensions for their workers.’’ The annual public pension tab in Ohio, currently $4.1 billion, is growing by around $700 million per year. “Retirement incomes for the most experienced government employees top out at 88 percent of their active-duty pay,’’ writes James Nash of the Columbus Dispatch. “Unlike most private-sector workers, whose retirement is driven by the strength of the stock market and 401(k) plans, government employees’ pensions are guaranteed.’’




Moreover, government retirees in Ohio enjoy taxpayer-provided health care, and in many cases can retire at 48. Especially egregious are “double-dippers’’ - public employees who “retire’’ and get a full pension while returning to work and collecting a paycheck. In 2009, double-dippers were paid nearly a billion dollars by Buckeye State public-pension systems.




Ohio is hardly unique. A public-pension tsunami is beginning to inundate government budgets at every level. As more and more of taxpayers’ earnings are confiscated to fund outsize public-sector benefits, the backlash from the private sector will only grow angrier and more intense.




“We are about to get run over by a locomotive,’’ warned California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in his State of the State address this month. Over the past decade, he said, pension costs for state employees swelled 2,000 percent - but revenues only increased 24 percent. The state has had to come up with funds to close that gap - funds diverted from “our universities, our parks, and other government functions.’’




Public-employee unions fiercely defend their pay and pensions, but even union-friendly Democrats are starting to acknowledge the inevitable. “The deal used to be that civil servants were paid less than private sector workers in exchange for an understanding that they had job security for life,’’ former San Francisco mayor and California Assembly speaker Willie Brown recently wrote in the San Francisco Chronicle. “But we politicians, pushed by our friends in labor, gradually expanded pay and benefits . . . while keeping the job protections and layering on incredibly generous retirement packages . . . Talking about this is politically unpopular . . . But at some point, someone is going to have to get honest about the fact.’’




A showdown is coming, and more likely sooner than later. Taxpayers will put up with a lot, but their patience has its limits.


 








 


 





 


 


 





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Federal pay ahead of private industry






Updated 3/8/2010 3:03 PM |  Comments 1,909  |  Recommend 145
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Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.



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By Melissa Golden, Getty Images





Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.




















 PAYCHECK






The typical federal worker is paid 20% more than a private-sector worker in the same occupation. Median annual salary:





Federal
Private
Difference





$66,591
$55,500
$11,091






Sources: Bureau of Labor statistics, USA TODAY analysis





















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By Dennis Cauchon, USA TODAY
Federal employees earn higher average salaries than private-sector workers in more than eight out of 10 occupations, a USA TODAY analysis of federal data finds.

Accountants, nurses, chemists, surveyors, cooks, clerks and janitors are among the wide range of jobs that get paid more on average in the federal government than in the private sector.


Overall, federal workers earned an average salary of $67,691 in 2008 for occupations that exist both in government and the private sector, according toBureau of Labor Statistics data. The average pay for the same mix of jobs in the private sector was $60,046 in 2008, the most recent data available.


 


CHART: Federal salaries compared to private-sector

 


These salary figures do not include the value of health, pension and other benefits, which averaged $40,785 per federal employee in 2008 vs. $9,882 per private worker, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.


Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.


Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., made federal pay an issue in his successful campaign to fill Edward Kennedy's seat and is fighting for a pay freeze.


The federal government spent about $224 billion in 2008 on compensation for about 2 million civilian employees.


"The data flip the conventional wisdom on its head," saysCato Institute budget analyst Chris Edwards, a critic of federal pay policy. "Federal workers make substantially more than private workers, not less, in addition to having a large advantage in benefits."


But National Treasury Employees Union President Colleen Kelley says the comparison is faulty because it "compares apples and oranges." Federal accountants, for example, perform work that has more complexity and requires more skill than accounting work in the private sector, she says.


"When you look at the actual duties, you see that very few federal jobs align with those in the private sector," she says. She says federal employees are paid an average of 26% less than non-federal workers doing comparable work.


Office of Personnel Management spokeswoman Sedelta Verble, says higher pay also reflects the longevity and older age of federal workers.


USA TODAY used Bureau of Labor Statistics data to compare salaries in every federal job that had a private-sector equivalent. For example, the federal government's 57,000 registered nurses — working for the Veterans Administration and elsewhere — were paid an average of $74,460 a year, $10,680 more than the average for private-sector nurses.


The BLS reports that 216 occupations covering 1.1 million federal workers exist in both the federal government and the private sector. An additional 124 federal occupations covering 750,000 employees — air-traffic controllers, tax collectors and others — did not have direct equivalents, according to the BLS.


Federal jobs have more limited salary ranges than private-sector jobs, some of which have million-dollar payouts.


Key findings:


• Federal. The federal pay premium cut across all job categories — white-collar, blue-collar, management, professional, technical and low-skill. In all, 180 jobs paid better average salaries in the federal government; 36 paid better in the private sector.


Private. The private sector paid more on average in a select group of high-skill occupations, including lawyers, veterinarians and airline pilots. The government's 5,200 computer research scientists made an average of $95,190, about $10,000 less than the average in the corporate world.


State and local. State government employees had an average salary of $47,231 in 2008, about 5% less than comparable jobs in the private sector. City and county workers earned an average of $43,589, about 2% more than private workers in similar jobs. State and local workers have higher total compensation than private workers when the value of benefits is included.


Job comparison


Average federal salaries exceed average private-sector pay in 83% of comparable occupations. A sampling of average annnual salaries in 2008, the most recent data:





Job
Federal
Private
Difference


Airline pilot, copilot, flight engineer
$93,690
$120,012
-$26,322





Broadcast technician
$90,310
$49,265
$41,045





Budget analyst
$73,140
$65,532
$7,608





Chemist
$98,060
$72,120
$25,940





Civil engineer
$85,970
$76,184
$9,786





Clergy
$70,460
$39,247
$31,213





Computer, information systems manager
$122,020
$115,705
$6,315





Computer support specialist
$45,830
$54,875
-$9,045





Cook
$38,400
$23,279
$15,121





Crane, tower operator
$54,900
$44,044
$10,856





Dental assistant
$36,170
$32,069
$4,101





Economist
$101,020
$91,065
$9,955





Editors
$42,210
$54,803
-$12,593





Electrical engineer
$86,400
$84,653
$1,747





Financial analysts
$87,400
$81,232
$6,168





Graphic designer
$70,820
$46,565
$24,255





Highway maintenance worker
$42,720
$31,376
$11,344





Janitor
$30,110
$24,188
$5,922





Landscape architects
$80,830
$58,380
$22,450





Laundry, dry-cleaning worker
$33,100
$19,945
$13,155





Lawyer
$123,660
$126,763
-$3,103





Librarian
$76,110
$63,284
$12,826





Locomotive engineer
$48,440
$63,125
-$14,685





Machinist
$51,530
$44,315
$7,215





Mechanical engineer
$88,690
$77,554
$11,136





Office clerk
$34,260
$29,863
$4,397





Optometrist
$61,530
$106,665
-$45,135





Paralegals
$60,340
$48,890
$11,450





Pest control worker
$48,670
$33,675
$14,995





Physicians, surgeons
$176,050
$177,102
-$1,052





Physician assistant
$77,770
$87,783
-$10,013





Procurement clerk
$40,640
$34,082
$6,558





Public relations manager
$132,410
$88,241
$44,169





Recreation worker
$43,630
$21,671
$21,959





Registered nurse
$74,460
$63,780
$10,680





Respiratory therapist
$46,740
$50,443
-$3,703





Secretary
$44,500
$33,829
$10,671





Sheet metal worker
$49,700
$43,725
$5,975





Statistician
$88,520
$78,065
$10,455





Surveyor
$78,710
$67,336
$11,374






Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, USA TODAY analysis


But I expect you will attack my sources next. . 






 


 


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Federal pay ahead of private industry






Updated 3/8/2010 3:03 PM |  Comments 1,909  |  Recommend 145
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Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.



Enlarge image Enlarge
By Melissa Golden, Getty Images





Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.




















 PAYCHECK






The typical federal worker is paid 20% more than a private-sector worker in the same occupation. Median annual salary:





Federal
Private
Difference





$66,591
$55,500
$11,091






Sources: Bureau of Labor statistics, USA TODAY analysis





















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By Dennis Cauchon, USA TODAY
Federal employees earn higher average salaries than private-sector workers in more than eight out of 10 occupations, a USA TODAY analysis of federal data finds.

Accountants, nurses, chemists, surveyors, cooks, clerks and janitors are among the wide range of jobs that get paid more on average in the federal government than in the private sector.


Overall, federal workers earned an average salary of $67,691 in 2008 for occupations that exist both in government and the private sector, according toBureau of Labor Statistics data. The average pay for the same mix of jobs in the private sector was $60,046 in 2008, the most recent data available.


 


CHART: Federal salaries compared to private-sector

 


These salary figures do not include the value of health, pension and other benefits, which averaged $40,785 per federal employee in 2008 vs. $9,882 per private worker, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.


Federal pay has become a hot political issue in recent months because of concerns over the federal budget deficit and recession-battered wages in the private sector.


Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., made federal pay an issue in his successful campaign to fill Edward Kennedy's seat and is fighting for a pay freeze.


The federal government spent about $224 billion in 2008 on compensation for about 2 million civilian employees.


"The data flip the conventional wisdom on its head," saysCato Institute budget analyst Chris Edwards, a critic of federal pay policy. "Federal workers make substantially more than private workers, not less, in addition to having a large advantage in benefits."


But National Treasury Employees Union President Colleen Kelley says the comparison is faulty because it "compares apples and oranges." Federal accountants, for example, perform work that has more complexity and requires more skill than accounting work in the private sector, she says.


"When you look at the actual duties, you see that very few federal jobs align with those in the private sector," she says. She says federal employees are paid an average of 26% less than non-federal workers doing comparable work.


Office of Personnel Management spokeswoman Sedelta Verble, says higher pay also reflects the longevity and older age of federal workers.


USA TODAY used Bureau of Labor Statistics data to compare salaries in every federal job that had a private-sector equivalent. For example, the federal government's 57,000 registered nurses — working for the Veterans Administration and elsewhere — were paid an average of $74,460 a year, $10,680 more than the average for private-sector nurses.


The BLS reports that 216 occupations covering 1.1 million federal workers exist in both the federal government and the private sector. An additional 124 federal occupations covering 750,000 employees — air-traffic controllers, tax collectors and others — did not have direct equivalents, according to the BLS.


Federal jobs have more limited salary ranges than private-sector jobs, some of which have million-dollar payouts.


Key findings:


• Federal. The federal pay premium cut across all job categories — white-collar, blue-collar, management, professional, technical and low-skill. In all, 180 jobs paid better average salaries in the federal government; 36 paid better in the private sector.


Private. The private sector paid more on average in a select group of high-skill occupations, including lawyers, veterinarians and airline pilots. The government's 5,200 computer research scientists made an average of $95,190, about $10,000 less than the average in the corporate world.


State and local. State government employees had an average salary of $47,231 in 2008, about 5% less than comparable jobs in the private sector. City and county workers earned an average of $43,589, about 2% more than private workers in similar jobs. State and local workers have higher total compensation than private workers when the value of benefits is included.


Job comparison


Average federal salaries exceed average private-sector pay in 83% of comparable occupations. A sampling of average annnual salaries in 2008, the most recent data:





Job
Federal
Private
Difference


Airline pilot, copilot, flight engineer
$93,690
$120,012
-$26,322





Broadcast technician
$90,310
$49,265
$41,045





Budget analyst
$73,140
$65,532
$7,608





Chemist
$98,060
$72,120
$25,940





Civil engineer
$85,970
$76,184
$9,786





Clergy
$70,460
$39,247
$31,213





Computer, information systems manager
$122,020
$115,705
$6,315





Computer support specialist
$45,830
$54,875
-$9,045





Cook
$38,400
$23,279
$15,121





Crane, tower operator
$54,900
$44,044
$10,856





Dental assistant
$36,170
$32,069
$4,101





Economist
$101,020
$91,065
$9,955





Editors
$42,210
$54,803
-$12,593





Electrical engineer
$86,400
$84,653
$1,747





Financial analysts
$87,400
$81,232
$6,168





Graphic designer
$70,820
$46,565
$24,255





Highway maintenance worker
$42,720
$31,376
$11,344





Janitor
$30,110
$24,188
$5,922





Landscape architects
$80,830
$58,380
$22,450





Laundry, dry-cleaning worker
$33,100
$19,945
$13,155





Lawyer
$123,660
$126,763
-$3,103





Librarian
$76,110
$63,284
$12,826





Locomotive engineer
$48,440
$63,125
-$14,685





Machinist
$51,530
$44,315
$7,215





Mechanical engineer
$88,690
$77,554
$11,136





Office clerk
$34,260
$29,863
$4,397





Optometrist
$61,530
$106,665
-$45,135





Paralegals
$60,340
$48,890
$11,450





Pest control worker
$48,670
$33,675
$14,995





Physicians, surgeons
$176,050
$177,102
-$1,052





Physician assistant
$77,770
$87,783
-$10,013





Procurement clerk
$40,640
$34,082
$6,558





Public relations manager
$132,410
$88,241
$44,169





Recreation worker
$43,630
$21,671
$21,959





Registered nurse
$74,460
$63,780
$10,680





Respiratory therapist
$46,740
$50,443
-$3,703





Secretary
$44,500
$33,829
$10,671





Sheet metal worker
$49,700
$43,725
$5,975





Statistician
$88,520
$78,065
$10,455





Surveyor
$78,710
$67,336
$11,374






Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, USA TODAY analysis






Let the bridges I burn light the way. You are special, just like everybody else. Calling an illegal alien an ‘undocumented immigrant’ is like calling a drug dealer an ‘unlicensed pharmacist’

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