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Year of Hell - Great or Greatest?

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Created by: jamestkirk420

Sora

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Report this May. 23 2011, 6:51 pm

Only thing I would've done to make this episode better would be to make it a season long arc rather than a two parter. I think having all of Season 4 this plotline or most of Season 4 would've been awesome!

lostshaker

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Report this May. 23 2011, 7:15 pm

While I enjoy "Year of Hell", I prefer "Future's End", "Scorpion" and "The Klling Game" a bit more. I'd prefer "Year of Hell" include Kes' warning regarding the Krenim from "Before and After", but realize the omission could have been due to Annorax's Temporal Alterations. I did enjoy Seven's mention of "First Contact" and the consistency with Tuvok and the Krenim torpedo. I also enjoyed Chakotay's and Paris' parts aboard the Annorax's ship.

lostshaker

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Report this May. 23 2011, 7:16 pm

Quote: Sora @ May. 23 2011, 6:51 pm

>

>Only thing I would've done to make this episode better would be to make it a season long arc rather than a two parter. I think having all of Season 4 this plotline or most of Season 4 would've been awesome!

>


Interesting idea, but I certainly wouldn't want the reset ending. That would be a little too Dallas.

SLagonia

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Report this May. 23 2011, 7:49 pm

9/10 - The #3 episode of Voyager, and #17 overall.

guillermo.mejía

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Report this May. 23 2011, 7:58 pm

Great episode, indeed. The greatest, I don't think so.


Personally, I think 'Endgame' or 'Future's End' are stronger episodes, not to take anything away from YoH I and II. The time ship was an innovative story element and I liked the Krenim mad scientist, not to mention Chakotay  being swayed by him for a bit.


The ending seemed a little strange though. I find it hard that, if none of that ever happened, Gun-ho Janeway, who would cross Borg space to get home sooner, would heed a simple warning about an area under despute and just take a longer route. Just seems so out of character with her. And if the Krenim dude is designing the ship again from what we can see at the end, what's to stop it from happening again, with Voyager moving away from Krenim space.


"Aye. And if my grandmother had wheels she'd be a wagon." - Scotty, The Miracle Worker since 2265.

Matthias Russell

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Report this May. 24 2011, 4:29 am

I don't consider it all so great because of resetting the timeline and the episdoe having no memorable consequence to the crew.  They missed a valuable opportunity for the crew to go from being explorers to survivors and deal with the emotional strain like TNG Family and ENT Homecoming.


Ezri Janeway

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Report this May. 24 2011, 4:51 am

Quote: guillermo.mejía @ May. 23 2011, 7:58 pm

>

> what's to stop it from happening again, with Voyager moving away from Krenim space.

>


Exactly!


To my mind it didnt happen again. The last time he had become mad with guilt over not spending enough time with his family, but this time he left his work to do just that. So, even if the ship was built (a little later than the first time around in my imagination) and he still lost his family, I suspect he would mourn normally and move on in a more responsible way.


As for Janeway, she often ordered  a go around rather than push themselves into unwelcome territory and she's human so decisions like this can often go either way. Ok she was likely to ask about the dispute with a view to maybe getting passage before deciding otherwise, but that would have added more unneccessary minutes on to the end of a story already told so a little suspension of disbelief was required to tie it up is all.


"Let me see if Ive got this straight. You're risking the ship, the crew, and the mission on the assumptions that Helkara and Leishman are engineering geniuses, Tharp is a piloting savant, our transporter chief can work miracles, and the Breen are unwilling to sacrifice themselves in a kamikaze attack?" "Yup." "Damn I LOVE this job."

KelisThePoet

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Report this May. 25 2011, 1:49 pm

I really love this episode.  20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is one of my favorite books, and while I'm not sure it was intentional, the parts of this episode on the time ship really remind me of 20,000 Leagues--the ruthless, mysterious and intriguing captain who beguiles one of his prisoners to share his enthusiams, while he can't handle the hot temper of the other prisoner--the ship as a collection or repository from all the places it travels--the dinner scene.


On the whole, the two-part episodes are not my favorites.  I feel like they overemphasize action and adventure at the expense of science-fiction, and often they simply don't have enough plot to justify their run-time--so you get really interesting set ups in the first part, but by the end of the first hour, the resolution is clearly in sight, and the second part is almost wholly devoted to action sequences.  "Year of Hell" stands out in my mind all the more because it doesn't run like the other two-parters.  While there's plenty of action and excitement, the entire plot revolves around a science-fictional concept, the time ship.  And the plot remains complicated and multi-faceted all the way through, with the second part significantly different from the first.


I don't mind the fact that the ending resets the timeline, at all.  For me, this was the perfect way to seriously explore some darker material in a tightly written, compact story, without changing the tone of the whole series, turning the episodic adventures of the series into a soap opera, or drowning the series' writing in a lot of angsty melo-drama.


Falor was a prosperous merchant who went on a journey to gain greater awareness: Through storms he crossed the Voroth Sea/ To reach the clouded shores of Raal/ Where old T’Para offered truth./ He traveled through the windswept hills/ And crossed the barren Fire Plains/ To find the silent monks of Kir./ Still unfulfilled, he journeyed home/ Told stories of the lessons learned/ And gained true wisdom by the giving. – Falor’s Journey, “Innocence”

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