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Yemen

caltrek2

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POSTS: 2654

Report this Mar. 21 2011, 2:24 pm

Wow, things are happening so fast in the Middle East that I am finding it increasingly difficult to keep up with the fast breaking events. A case in point: Yemen


 


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/world/middleeast/22yemen.html?partner=rss&emc=rss


SANA, Yemen — In a significant erosion of support for Yemen’s embattled president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, the country’s senior military figure and four other top generals on Monday threw their support behind protesters calling for his immediate ouster, joining a rising tide of defecting tribal figures and diplomats.








 


As the country girded itself for the next stage of a deepening crisis, rival soldiers held positions in different sections of Sana, the capital. The United States Embassy urged Americans in Yemen to stay indoors on Monday night because of “political instability and uncertainty” here in Sana and around the country.


“I declare on their behalf our peaceful support for the youth revolution and that we are going to fulfill our complete duty in keeping the security and stability in the capital,” General Ahmar said in an interview on Al Jazeera on Monday. He said that violence against protesters was “pushing the country to the edge of civil war.”






General Ahmar is often described as a rival of the president, but he has mostly been a pillar of support for Mr. Saleh throughout his 32-year rule.


But the defense minister, Brig. Gen. Muhammad Nasir Ali, later said on television that the armed forces remained loyal to Mr. Saleh. General Ali said the army would “protect the achievements of the nation under the president” and would “not allow any attempts to overthrow legitimacy and democracy.”


While some Yemen specialists speculated that military leaders might be moving toward a negotiated exit for Mr. Saleh, General Ali’s statement underscored the appearance of a serious split in the military.


 



FleetAdmiral_BamBam

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Report this Mar. 23 2011, 10:42 am

Yep - Muslim Brotherhood is busy.  Will Obama send our troops there too to "stop any potential atrocities?"


Lieutenant_Jedi

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Report this Mar. 23 2011, 10:55 am

Yet another dictatorship destabilized. Of course it is unknown what kind of government will take its place. 


Egypt is the nation that really warrants observation, as other newly "freed" nations will take their cues from it. 


"Can you detect midi - chlorians with a tricorder?"

caltrek2

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POSTS: 2654

Report this Mar. 25 2011, 5:49 am

Interesting comment about Egypt. In addition to the desire for "freedom" there may be other underlying causes common to many of these recent events. Here is a link and an excerpt from an artilce by Micheal klare pointing to a couple of those inter-related variables:


http://www.thenation.com/article/159165/oil-food-price-shock


"The correlation became particularly evident in 2007–08, when the prices of oil and food reached record levels and helped fuel the Great Recession. Between July 2007 and June 2008, crude oil rose from $75 per barrel to $140, an increase of 87 percent; during the same period, basic food prices also shot up, from about $160 to $225 on the “Food Price Index” (with $100 representing the average cost of the same staples in 2002–04) calculated by the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). That the price of oil and food rose in tandem at this time is hardly surprising, the World Bank concluded in 2009, as “agricultural production is fairly energy intensive.” Rising oil prices “raised the price of fuels to power machinery and irrigation systems; it also raised the price of fertilizer and other chemicals that are energy intensive to produce.”


To make matters worse, the rising price of oil—combined with government efforts to address global warming—has increased the incentives to grow plants for biofuels instead of food, inevitably driving up food prices. Whenever oil prices rise above $50 per barrel, the World Bank has determined, a 1 percent increase in the price of oil results in a 0.9 percent increase in the price of maize, “because every dollar increase in the price of oil increases the profitability of ethanol and hence biofuel demand for maize.” It is no surprise, then, that two-thirds of the increase in world maize production since 2004 went to meet increased biofuel demand in the United States, leaving little to satisfy the world’s growing need for food and animal feed.


The sharp jump in food prices in 2008 led to riots in more than a dozen countries, including Egypt, Haiti and Pakistan [see Walden Bello, “Manufacturing a Food Crisis,” and Reed Lindsay, “Haiti on the ‘Death Plan,’ ” June 2, 2008]. In an effort to avert more such turbulence, the G-8 group of wealthy nations, at their 2009 meeting in L’Aquila, Italy, promised to donate $20 billion over the following three years for agricultural advancement in the developing world. By the beginning of 2011, however, less than one-twentieth of that amount had been contributed, and there had been little progress in boosting global food output. Now, with oil prices again on the rise, the price of food is likely to surpass all previous records and spark additional upheavals around the world.


What we are seeing, in effect, is a vicious cycle in which rising oil prices drive up the cost of food, which triggers political disorder in the oil-producing countries, which in turn pushes oil to still higher prices, propelling food costs even higher, and so forth—with no end in sight.


This deadly cycle is being augmented, moreover, by the accelerating effects of climate change. While it is nearly impossible to attribute any particular weather event to global warming, the growing frequency and intensity of severe events—including the punishing drought last summer in Russia and Ukraine, the recent floods in Australia and the drought that recently gripped northern China—are consistent with climate change models. These events have all occurred in critical wheat-producing areas, stoking fears of inadequate grain supplies ahead and further spurring the upward climb in food prices.


The rage produced by rising food prices may have been superseded by political concerns in the more recent outbursts in North Africa and the Middle East, but it has hardly disappeared. Global prices are now higher than at any time since the FAO began compiling its Food Price Index two decades ago, and they are expected to keep climbing as oil costs rise. This suggests that the G-8 pledges made in 2009 to enhance agriculture in the developing world are more urgent than ever, as are other steps to increase the availability and affordability of basic foodstuffs. But everything, in the end, hinges on oil, so we must sharply curtail consumption of petroleum products in order to bring down the cost of food and fuel, slow the pace of global warming. We must also put a permanent end to the practice of propping up foreign oil dictators."

Lieutenant_Jedi

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POSTS: 1728

Report this Mar. 25 2011, 7:39 am

Excellent. The need for an alternative for oil is so obvious it is amazing that no one in power takes it seriously. The money being made by the oil industry and the other industries that depend on that oil is blinding them to the catastrophe that they are nearing. 


"Can you detect midi - chlorians with a tricorder?"

lligevets

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POSTS: 777

Report this Mar. 25 2011, 1:42 pm

ss


Here is a link and an excerpt from an artilce by Micheal klare pointing to a couple of those inter-related variables:


 


 


This article cannot be serious “Global Warming” He blames the crisis of Oil, Food Production, dictators, and America for not giving Billions of dollars on global warming. Come on you can’t believe this stuff?


 


 

Jack Winterbourne

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Report this Mar. 26 2011, 3:03 pm

Quote: lligevets @ Mar. 25 2011, 1:42 pm

>

>ss

>Here is a link and an excerpt from an artilce by Micheal klare pointing to a couple of those inter-related variables:

class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">This article cannot be serious “Global Warming” He blames the crisis of Oil, Food Production, dictators, and America for not giving Billions of dollars on global warming. Come on you can’t believe this stuff?

class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"> 

>


 


It's not news. It's not even controversial or speculative. It's a concise summary of the reality

caltrek2

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POSTS: 2654

Report this Apr. 13 2011, 5:34 am

Here is another intersting article on Yemen that also appeared in The Nation:


http://www.thenation.com/article/159578/dangerous-us-game-yemen


As I mentioned in another thread, Yemen is a very important country to understand if you are serious about tracking Al Qaeda and its potential for future problems. Yemen is on the Arabian peninsula, just to the south of Saudi Arabia. As such, a lot of Bin Laden types hang out and organize there. The article questions the wisdom of both the Bush and Obama policies in Yemen, pointing out how covert military actions carried out by U.S. forces have often missed their targets, killing innocent civilians or even allies in the process. Further, our actions there may have contributed to the downfall of Ali Abdullah Saleh, the recently deposed president of Yemen. This is due in part to unsuccessful attempts to keep those actions secret.


An allusion is made in the story that should be appealing to Star Trek fans, in which Saleh is described as having "quite a run in a country where it's dog-eat-dog. It's like being the captain on a Klingon battle cruiser, you know? They're just waiting"


 

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