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Are you a trekkie engineer?

daughterofbalok

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POSTS: 5

Report this Mar. 07 2011, 8:18 pm

Im doing a paper on the trekkie subculture for my college writing class, and was wondering what sort of careers trekkies go into or may have been interested in because of the show.


 


If you have time briefly explain why your career choice may have been affected by your fandom, and what is your job. Thanks!


 


I'm looking to see if there is a correlation between engineering field and trekkie fandom, being an engineer and a trekkie myself.


 

CaptainMauin

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POSTS: 2511

Report this Mar. 07 2011, 8:33 pm

I'm not an engineer, but being a Trekkie has driven me more towards a scientific background. I usually do well in the sciences, mostly Biology though. Why am I inspired to do Bio? Probably because I am a fan of the Doctors of Star Trek. They're a cool bunch, but really... Wait for it... I'm a scientist, not a Doctor.


If it was possible, I'd take a career involving science, but it's not. Knowing me, I'd get bored of science after a while and go looking for something else. I'm a wanderer, and that attribute may be from Star Trek, since the shows are generally about Space Exploration, and other journies and such (ex. Characters... The way they develop over the seasons is a journey of sorts). 


Anyways, in my case, it may not be the fandom that influences the job, but the job that influences the fandom. I'm more likely to work at a WalMart or something, and that isn't exactly a high income job. As it is now, I woudn't be able to afford much in terms of Trek merchandise. *shrug* Not that it matters, since there are plenty of ways to enjoy Trek without having to pay a few thousand dollars.


That view may not have been exactly what you are looking for, but hopefully it will help you a bit.


Goodbye. I am gone.

daughterofbalok

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POSTS: 5

Report this Mar. 07 2011, 8:40 pm

That's perfectly logical! Thanks! I hope more people respond!

ScienceAlive

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Report this Mar. 07 2011, 9:07 pm

I am currently a student...a microbiology major/biochemistry minor with high aspirations for a thesis in the field of marine dead zone microbials and the ultimate goal of a doctorate in marine science.


I would say my interest in Star Trek is the direct result of my personality/career choice and not the other way around. I think a show about exploration on a grand scale will always appeal to every scientist. Microbiology to me is just like space exploration, when you are under that lens watching those unimaginably tiny things, you are going where few people have been. In a sense, I am an explorer of strange new worlds. And I intend on making my own discoveries.


Good luck on your paper.


I'm takin no direction and I walk-a real slow, For the words of oppression are go, go, go. Caribbean time in motion, fireflyin across the ocean. And I can see the future.

daughterofbalok

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POSTS: 5

Report this Mar. 07 2011, 10:16 pm

ScienceAlive, I hope you succeed as well!  Your work sounds outstanding and you seem really excited about it! Thanks for responding!


 

janewayjunkie74656

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POSTS: 3227

Report this Mar. 07 2011, 10:18 pm

Well I am only in 8th grade, but I am very interested in pursuing sciences/engineering, which is actually based on my love of Star Trek. NEVER would have imagined myself as a scientist/engineer before I got into Star Trek! (Well, that's not saying much, since I first watched ST when I was like 3. But I didn't get really really into it until I was like 9 or 10.)


But anyway, this summer I am going to take a one-week class with other people my age at my local college (I get to be in a dorm and everything, quite exciting for me!) that is specifically for young people who want to pursue a career in computer sciences or engineering. But you could say that I was inspired by great engineers: mainly Scotty, Geordi LaForge and B'Elanna Torres.


Hope that helps! Good luck!


Join Moon Crater Plaza! A great new board looking for lots of new members! http://s4.zetaboards.com/Moon_Crater_Plaza/index/

Matthias Russell

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POSTS: 7705

Report this Mar. 08 2011, 4:43 am

I'm an aerospace engineer in the space program. Trek didn't choose my career choice, I've always been fascinated with flying things and getting off the planet. However, I got out of trek and the impending death of the space program rekindled my interest in trek. I always say the only thing left of the manned space program is fantasy.

rocketscientist

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POSTS: 10054

Report this Mar. 08 2011, 7:52 am

Like Matthias, I'm an aerospace engineer as well.  I ended up getting a PhD, but now I would not recommend anyone going that far unless they are determined to work in academia.  It ends up being a waste on your opportunities, your time, and your lifetime income.  I do, however, recommend pursuing a master's degree. 


My graduate work's focus was in hypersonic flows/real gas effects (I had to take courses in plasma physics and quantum mechanics for that).  I ended up getting a job in  flight mechanics/trajectory design, etc. for both launch vehicles and satellites (and we do reentries too).  I recently spent a year doing fluid mechanics, which is what my background was in to begin with and I did a couple of interesting projects down there.  So, while I'm not doing exactly what I wanted to do, I can't really complain either.  You go where the job and the money is.  And, all in all, it's been interesting work.    


If anyone's truly interested in going into science and engineering, I do think one thing everyone should know is that you will never ever make as much money as some other fields, i.e. business, law, etc.  You start out with a good salary though and, so far, it's been consistent.  It's frustrating to me, though, that I will never do as well as my dad, even though I'm making as much money as him.  I'm not alone in that regard though.  The middle class is dying out in the US, as we all know.  Every generation is effectively poorer than the one before.  I am even more concerned now that I have twins coming in two weeks.      


I suppose "Star Trek," and the space shuttle program and reading sci-fi sparked my interest in science and engineering, like a lot of other people here.  Thanks to the effective death of the manned space program that Matthias alluded too, I guess fiction like "Star Trek," TNG, DS9, etc. will be even more important to inspire future generations to go into science and engineering.  I think it's kind of hypocritical for Obama (as much as I like and support him) to call for emphasis on better educating US children in science and engineering so that the US can maintain its technological lead (do we still have one?).  We are definitely losing in that regard to other countries.  But what's the incentive for young people to enter science or engineering fields (beyond computer science jobs for Google, Facebook, and the like)?  You'll make more money in business or as a lawyer.  Where's the inspiration?  The return to the moon and the mars mission, which every US president since Bush Sr. has called for, have never ever been serious endeavors. 


Rant over.  Sorry, I got carried away on that.


  


KHAAAAAAANNNNNN!!!!!

Matthias Russell

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Report this Mar. 08 2011, 10:36 am

No, no, preach on brutha.

I got half way through my master's and had to quit for monetary reasons. I have no desire to go back, though. The master's should help specialize you and give you skills you can take to the work place. My school's MSAE was basically a step into getting a doctorate, being all theory. Few of the courses were even aerospace specific since most of the professors had spent their entire careers in academia.

rocketscientist

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POSTS: 10054

Report this Mar. 08 2011, 10:46 am

Quote: Matthias Russell @ Mar. 08 2011, 10:36 am

>No, no, preach on brutha. I got half way through my master's and had to quit for monetary reasons. I have no desire to go back, though. The master's should help specialize you and give you skills you can take to the work place. My school's MSAE was basically a step into getting a doctorate, being all theory. Few of the courses were even aerospace specific since most of the professors had spent their entire careers in academia.


Huh.  Well, I can see your point wrt the master's, Matthias.  I guess I agree with you that some of the those courses and/or profs aren't really that applicable to practical workplace engineering.  I dunno, I still felt that getting the master's helps.  At the very least, I felt it gave me some more confidence, experience, and knowledge in solving difficult problems, even if most of what I learned in graduate school isn't being used on the job.  But if you felt it wasn't doing you any good wrt career and you were paying for it, then I can totally understand why you just said shine it.  I've met some really good engineers who didn't have master's degrees.  They have a really really good understanding of the physics and inner-workings of their programs, so I do agree with you that you don't necessarily need a master's to be a successful and good engineer at all.


Did you ever think about trying another school?  Maybe it was the one you were going to?


 


KHAAAAAAANNNNNN!!!!!

parisandtorres

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Report this Mar. 08 2011, 11:03 am

I want to study to be an Engineer, and I love science.  Of course I'm not in College yet.


rocketscientist

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Report this Mar. 08 2011, 11:10 am

Quote: parisandtorres @ Mar. 08 2011, 11:03 am

>

>I want to study to be an Engineer, and I love science.  Of course I'm not in College yet.

>


Are you good at math?  You have got to be good at math if you want to be an engineer.


At least, you need to be good at math to get through engineering school.


 


 


KHAAAAAAANNNNNN!!!!!

Matthias Russell

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Report this Mar. 08 2011, 11:31 am

Yes, to get you through school, lol.

I would have loved to have finished it, even though I was frustrated. I was running a wind tunnel as a GTA so my tuition was covered but I had a wife and kid and bills were stacking up. I just don't have the time anymore.
I did take some good classes, the graduate stress classes were excellent. I also miss the wind tunnel. If I had been single, things would have gone differently. I don't recommend ERAU, though.

rocketscientist

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POSTS: 10054

Report this Mar. 08 2011, 11:47 am

Quote: Matthias Russell @ Mar. 08 2011, 11:31 am

>Yes, to get you through school, lol. I would have loved to have finished it, even though I was frustrated. I was running a wind tunnel as a GTA so my tuition was covered but I had a wife and kid and bills were stacking up. I just don't have the time anymore. I did take some good classes, the graduate stress classes were excellent. I also miss the wind tunnel. If I had been single, things would have gone differently. I don't recommend ERAU, though.


Ok, got it.  You had a family to support at the time.  I was single, so I survived (barely).  I had a couple of buddies that just had had enough and dropped out of the PhD because the whole thing just seemed endless.  Anyway, I can totally understand your situation now.  You did the right thing.   


ERAU? 


 


KHAAAAAAANNNNNN!!!!!

Matthias Russell

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POSTS: 7705

Report this Mar. 08 2011, 12:22 pm

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

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