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WOW! HABITABLE PLANETS EVERYWHERE.

miklamar

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Report this Feb. 05 2011, 8:41 pm

Welcome, Sir_Mix_A_Lot! You sure arrived with a bang--almost a "Big Bang!" Awesome article! Thank you!

Var Miklama--Zakdorn, engineer. "A sound mind in a FULL body!" "Time, like latinum, is a limited quantity in the galaxy."

Lieutenant_Jedi

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Report this Feb. 05 2011, 11:57 pm

Now the method for detecting planets remains the same correct? That is the astronomer looks at the movement of the star, and if the star "wobbles" it is due to an orbiting mass. Then the amount of "wobble" is measured, and that determines the size of the orbiting mass?

"Can you detect midi - chlorians with a tricorder?"

MoppyCGDaniels

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Report this Feb. 09 2011, 8:49 pm

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-036


 


Although with the equation it summs up to a tight possibility for a Earth alike / planet with atmosphere.

Lieutenant_Jedi

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Report this Feb. 09 2011, 9:24 pm

Interesting article. That seems a very strange way to find a planet. Could there be other explanations for the star's decrease in brightness?

"Can you detect midi - chlorians with a tricorder?"

dryson

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Report this Feb. 10 2011, 8:14 pm

The question is though how can a planet be determined to actually support life? Just because the planet resides within the habitable zone of a solar system does not mean that the planet will be habitable.


I wonder if Kepler can measure the light the is reflected off of the planets surface and the clouds of the planet to determine whether or not the planet is habitable.


Test's have proven that light reacts differently in many different densities of an atmosphere. If Kepler were to take the amount of light that is reflected from the surface of Earth and the clouds and then set up some type of system that would allow for a comparison between the 'brightness' of each planet found against the brightness of Earth's reflected light then Kepler might be able to discover which planets are habitable in comparison to Earth.


You might say that isn't possible because of all of the variable's involved. But if we look at planets like Venus or Mercury that have a certain brightness to them based upon the reflection of light in the atmosphere that we know are uninhabited then we can say that if we place the same brightness level of Earth against any planet found and said planet resides within a range between 50% to 75% of the same brightness of Earth then the planet might be habitable.


At the lower ranges between 5% to 30% the brightness of Earth the planet might be somewhat colder and possibly a tundra but still able to be lived in.


At the middle ranges between 31% to 50% the brighteness of Earth the planet might be somewhat warmer and possibly in the temperature range of moderatley temperate planet cool to warm all year long but possibly extremely cold in the winter.


At the higher ranges between 51% to 75% the brightness of Earth the planet might be more comparable to the Sahara in Africa very warm to hot all year long.


At the point of being Earth like at around 75% to 100% the brightness of Earth the planet would reside in various ranges of temperatures comparable to Earth.


Any brightness above the 100% range might result in a planet undergoing an ice age as the ice and snow coverage planet would reflect more light between the snow, ice and clouds than would be absorded by the ground. 


A bullfrog with a light in its belly is nothing more than a glutton looking to shine otherwise.

Chaviv Lazar

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Report this Feb. 12 2011, 11:29 am

Yes. I have always held that the possibility of life elsewhere is a rather high probability given size of univers and other factors. While I like Trek, I always remind people that the one thing we need to keep in mind about life out there is it may not be humanoid at all. In which case, we need to be more open-minded and look for more variety than the cariacture alien.

Live Long and Prosper

Lieutenant_Jedi

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Report this Feb. 13 2011, 7:28 am

Even with all these planets being discovered, we still have no way of getting there in any reasonable period of time, or of observing them in any detail. What would be the better course of investment - better observational tools or faster methods of travel?

"Can you detect midi - chlorians with a tricorder?"

Treknoir

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Report this Feb. 13 2011, 3:53 pm

Quote: Lieutenant_Jedi @ Feb. 13 2011, 7:28 am

>Even with all these planets being discovered, we still have no way of getting there in any reasonable period of time, or of observing them in any detail. What would be the better course of investment - better observational tools or faster methods of travel?


Better observational tools. I would like to echo and expand upon Chaviv's previous comment.


1) While scientists are working within the frames of what they know and have observed, we should also be open to the idea that the factors we consider essential for "life" may not, in fact, be essential for all types of "life" to form and evolve into sentient and intelligent beings. Thus, focusing only on what we consider to be habitable planets may in fact be shortsighted. However, working with limited resources and technology, we should go with what we know and understand for now.


2) Better observational tools and unmanned probes would be, IMO, the best, most efficient, and safest way to get answers. Again, we can not assume that "life" on an alien planet is in ANY way like our own. Even if they are "intelligent" they may not be safe or trustworthy.


My personal gut feeling, with ZERO science to back it up, is that the humanoid model is common. At least for this galaxy. But probably not all there is out there. I wonder if I will live long enough to find out if my hunch is correct or incorrect?


It is curious how often you humans manage to obtain that which you do not want. - Spock

iBorg13

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Report this Feb. 14 2011, 12:31 am

Fascinating stuff!!

silvermoonstone05@myspace
.com

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Report this Feb. 23 2011, 5:27 am

I know im late but on habital planets, scientist think they can take pics of worlds with water with the James Webb.  


 


http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/09/glint-exo-oceans/


 


and actually Kepler watches for dips in the stars light curve.  you can do that to at planethunters.org.  you can spend so much time there. some of the lite curves are pretty wild.  I ran across an over-contact bianery system thats light curve was nucken futz.


If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe. Carl Sagan

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