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The Gene Roddenberry philosophy.

Nirmanakaya

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POSTS: 3295

Report this Nov. 13 2009, 10:30 am

I have been watching earth final conflict for the first time and the last DVD of the season 1 talks about the Roddenberry philosophy.  Specifically about an episode called infection.  

Even though the episode was good I was kind of put off by the fact that the setting which is supposed to be the 21st century (that is today now!;), the bad guys are KKK members.

Roddenberry¿s Utopian vision of the future in which society is homogenized, with military governance and a total state allocated command economy the likes of which hankfully has not yet come to pass , but we are well on our way  of government takeover in many countries in the world, lately including our own.  Rumors of a one world government are out there and worst yet these are not for the betterment of humanity but of total domination and power.

This vision is a fallacy in my opinion and one that our race is less and less likely to face.  Either way Roddenberry¿s philosophy a dystopian nightmare.

Anyhow, as a grounded philosopher and an artist I was curious in your opinion.

akebono62

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POSTS: 19767

Report this Nov. 13 2009, 1:03 pm

Quote (Nirmanakaya @ Nov. 13 2009, 7:30 am)
I have been watching earth final conflict for the first time and the last DVD of the season 1 talks about the Roddenberry philosophy. ¿Specifically about an episode called infection. ¿

Even though the episode was good I was kind of put off by the fact that the setting which is supposed to be the 21st century (that is today now!;), the bad guys are KKK members.

Roddenberry?s Utopian vision of the future in which society is homogenized, with military governance and a total state allocated command economy the likes of which hankfully has not yet come to pass , but we are well on our way ¿of government takeover in many countries in the world, lately including our own. ¿Rumors of a one world government are out there and worst yet these are not for the betterment of humanity but of total domination and power.

This vision is a fallacy in my opinion and one that our race is less and less likely to face. ¿Either way Roddenberry?s philosophy a dystopian nightmare.

Anyhow, as a grounded philosopher and an artist I was curious in your opinion.

Let's just say Gene had issues.

Avenger_Class2009

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POSTS: 4035

Report this Nov. 13 2009, 2:31 pm

Read "Civilizations Last Hurrah" by Gary G. Cohen.

My Webpage

Avenger_Class2009

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Report this Nov. 13 2009, 2:34 pm

Quote (GHOSTREK @ Nov. 13 2009, 2:33 pm)
Gene Roddenberry ¿is the greast philosopher sinice sun tzu

Come on now
Gene is a CULT icon

Jereath

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Report this Nov. 13 2009, 2:45 pm

Quote (Nirmanakaya @ Nov. 13 2009, 7:30 pm)
I have been watching earth final conflict for the first time and the last DVD of the season 1 talks about the Roddenberry philosophy. ¿Specifically about an episode called infection. ¿

Even though the episode was good I was kind of put off by the fact that the setting which is supposed to be the 21st century (that is today now!;), the bad guys are KKK members.

Roddenberry?s Utopian vision of the future in which society is homogenized, with military governance and a total state allocated command economy the likes of which hankfully has not yet come to pass , but we are well on our way ¿of government takeover in many countries in the world, lately including our own. ¿Rumors of a one world government are out there and worst yet these are not for the betterment of humanity but of total domination and power.

This vision is a fallacy in my opinion and one that our race is less and less likely to face. ¿Either way Roddenberry?s philosophy a dystopian nightmare.

Anyhow, as a grounded philosopher and an artist I was curious in your opinion.

you realise it is just a tv show you could read that mutch out of any show for exaple: Star Trek that is why we are here right.

also I liked the movie more than the show :p

Avenger_Class2009

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POSTS: 4035

Report this Nov. 13 2009, 2:47 pm

Quote (GHOSTREK @ Nov. 13 2009, 2:42 pm)
so you saying us startrek ?fans fellowers of clut ?

Yes we are cultists
Do you have a problem with that?
I admit it. Why can't others?

Quote
Definitions of cult on the Web:

followers of an exclusive system of religious beliefs and practices
fad: an interest followed with exaggerated zeal; "he always follows the latest fads"; "it was all the rage that season"
followers of an unorthodox, extremist, or false religion or sect who often live outside of conventional society under the direction of a charismatic leader
a religion or sect that is generally considered to be unorthodox, extremist, or false; "it was a satanic cult"


We are Star Trekkians and believe in the writings and philosophy of the "Gene" Master

Kdbtrekkin

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Report this Nov. 17 2009, 4:17 pm

I prefer Gene's Star Trek philosophy.

IVHoltzman

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Report this Nov. 17 2009, 10:27 pm

I hope for the future Roddenberry envisioned as Star Trek TOS.

But I expect the future Frank Herbert envisioned as Dune.

What made TOS great was that you could always go home again. It's not realistic, but it's comforting.

Kdbtrekkin

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POSTS: 3648

Report this Nov. 18 2009, 4:40 pm

Quote (Yourstruly_Jack_theRipper @ Nov. 17 2009, 4:18 pm)
Quote
The Gene Roddenberry philosophy


It's a TV show

and your point? All philosophy is just writings, Star Trek originated from Gene's writings from thoughts in his head.

Bruce Lee is a martial artist, but he's also a philosopher.

Frank Herbert is a science fiction writer, but his philosophy is throughout Dune.

Comms

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POSTS: 273

Report this Nov. 18 2009, 6:36 pm

Gene just gave visual representation of typical modern philosophies where society is run scientifically and man is perfectable. The end results varied.

The new civilizations Kirk encountered were usually tyranical variations and described a "souless". The Federation, or at least Earth, was seemingly benevolent but they never forgot what it cost to get there.

displacedvulcan

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Report this Nov. 18 2009, 8:26 pm

I think IDIC. Nuff said

Kdbtrekkin

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Report this Nov. 18 2009, 8:40 pm

Quote (GHOSTREK @ Nov. 18 2009, 4:44 pm)
Quote (Kdbtrekkin @ Nov. 17 2009, 6:40 pm)
Quote (Yourstruly_Jack_theRipper @ Nov. 17 2009, 4:18 pm)
Quote
The Gene Roddenberry philosophy


It's a TV show

and your point? All philosophy is just writings, Star Trek originated from Gene's writings from thoughts in his head.

Bruce Lee is a martial artist, but he's also a philosopher.

Frank Herbert is a science fiction writer, but his philosophy is throughout Dune.

true ¿about bruce lee

i never read dune

Check it out, very good science fiction, the best I think. Very deep.

Kdbtrekkin

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3648

Report this Nov. 18 2009, 8:42 pm

Quote (Yourstruly_Jack_theRipper @ Nov. 18 2009, 4:47 pm)
Quote (Kdbtrekkin @ Nov. 18 2009, 1:40 pm)
Quote (Yourstruly_Jack_theRipper @ Nov. 17 2009, 4:18 pm)
Quote
The Gene Roddenberry philosophy


It's a TV show

and your point? All philosophy is just writings, Star Trek originated from Gene's writings from thoughts in his head.

Bruce Lee is a martial artist, but he's also a philosopher.

Frank Herbert is a science fiction writer, but his philosophy is throughout Dune.

Does someone have to spell it out?
Go back and watch the TOS episodes

"For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"
The Return of the Archons"

Philosophies of men soon become religions of error

Only if you choose to make a philosophy a religion. I choose to take philosophy from all over as I see, ¿and this just to add to my own experience, a religion no, a guide forever changing and staying the same in some basics, for life, yes.

IVHoltzman

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POSTS: 0

Report this Nov. 18 2009, 11:41 pm

Quote (Yourstruly_Jack_theRipper @ Nov. 18 2009, 4:47 pm)
Does someone have to spell it out?
Go back and watch the TOS episodes

"For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"
"The Return of the Archons"

Philosophies of men soon become religions of error

...so they say also (wince)

Ah, but the philosophies of TOS dwelt repeatedly on exposing religions of error. Growing up in the 1970s, I valued the sermons taught by Roddenberry. They taught me how to step outside the box and look back in.

Catspaw was the first one I recall giving me a moment of clarity. Spock wasn't daunted by the Halloween inferences being projected by the aliens. Spock was solidly comfortable in the premise that there is no such thing as the supernatural (nature encompasses everything by definition). If Spock wasn't afraid of the dark, I didn't have to be, either.

Day of the Dove was also an eye-opener, for multiple reasons. At the depths of the Cold War, the interaction between Kirk and Kang was probably the most profound message of hope TOS ever sent... that people on both sides have been fed propaganda about the other side, while in reality neither side is either purely good or purely evil. That observation is even more desperately needed today as we watch both Christians and Muslims equally vilify the other despite their 98% commonality. But while we're on religious topics, I loved Kang's retort early in the episode. When Kirk told him to go to the devil, Kang said, "We have no devil, Kirk." That one statement hit this former 8-year-old like a shot... there existed people who had no fear of embodied supernatural evil because there was no such thing... at least for them... and if it didn't exist for them, why would it exist for me? Freedom!

The Return of the Archons was a dark thing for a kid to watch. I never really liked it much. But it's given me a watch-phrase which I use every time I realize I'm in the company of kool-aid drinkers. Not only am I not "of the body", I'm happy not to be.

Likewise with For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky. Whenever I stumble across that episode, I recite the lines from memory right along with the old man who invites death for speaking the truth, and I get choked up with tears of pride at his willingness to doubt. "Things are not as they teach us."

Friday's Child is another great set of life lessons. The line from Ma'ab still makes me grin... "Perhaps to be Te'er is to see in new ways. I begin to like you, Earthman, and I saw fear in the Klingon's eye."

Seeing in new ways is exactly what Roddenberry was all about.

He advocated constantly doubting whether our appraisal of a situation was accurate.

The Devil In The Dark was hands down the most powerful demonstration of that. All through the episode, we humans in the audience are afraid for the humans onscreen who keep being killed by the monster in the caves. And then there's that moment when the miners break into the corridor where the monster lies wounded... and Kirk blocks their attack. "That thing's killed fifty of my men!" the lead miner shouts. Kirk replies, "And you've killed thousands of her children!" Oh, dear god, WE'RE the monsters. WE'RE the devils in the dark.

The more willing a Trekkie is to being open to thoughts like that, the nearer he is to Roddenberry.

natenemo

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Report this Nov. 19 2009, 1:13 am

Science fiction stories, need a fictious philosophy.

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