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The Doctor

OtakuJo

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POSTS: 16362

Report this Jul. 21 2009, 9:25 am

Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)

The awful year? What?

mm now I got to remember when was that...? 1994 or 1996...? There was one year when all the queen's offspring were acting up or something and she referred to that year as her "annus horribilis" -- which of course led to the inevitable Clive James joke about Her Majesty having a horrible anus, or something.

Although there is a good chance that "Annus" and "Anus" are etymologically related because the latter means "old woman" but that's another story entirely.

Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)

It's interesting to note that contrary to popular belief American English, especially southern American English is far more archaic and closer to their common ancestor than English - and especially Queen's English. The 'broad-a', now a symbol of British eloquence was seen 120 years back as a vulgar mispronunciation.

Yeah I've heard that. That's why I kind of laugh a bit when people say that Americans can't play Englishmen from that period!

I think Australian is a mix of C0ckney and Irish (and a few other things to a lesser extent) because of the convicts -- whereas NZ especially Southland accent has a tad more Scottish influence. Or something.

Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)

Well, there's really no pattern between the different accents of England, and if one doesn't live there one wouldn't recognize a random accent as 'British', only RP, Estuary and ####ney immediately are noticeable.

mmm- I been around enough tourists and backpackers and all sorts to tell Yorkshire from Liverpool when I hear 'em.

Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)

Ah, you hate chick flicks?

Not at all. I don't prefer "chick flicks", but there are some I quite like -- "Notting Hill" for example. But there has to be something extra aside from the wub-wub. Like Notting Hill or Pride and Prejudice have interesting characters.

Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)
That's usually how it works, either consciously or subconsciously, people's whole image of people changes immediately and I find it appalling.

Yup. I get what you're saying. There is still an expectation that women should be GIRLY and men should be MANLY. I do tend to resist when people say "You should ask for help because you are a woman." Bull. I can lift at least half my bodyweight with enough momentum. And have. And can get by perfectly capably with only two or three pairs of shoes at any one time!! ¿:laugh:

Funny thing though that's not likely to change is I'm still someone for whom the number 16 is female. Although that said I'm not at all offended if mistaken for a guy. Each time just becomes another funny story.

yikes. what were we talking about again?

Well you just about managed to make me forget about Julian Bashir. In a topic about Julian Bashir. Given that I have to confess to usually being all obsessed and stuff, that's not a bad feat! ;)

juliansgirl7

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Report this Jul. 21 2009, 1:17 pm

Yeah, how did this thread get so hijacked?

Splurk

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Report this Jul. 21 2009, 11:06 pm

Quote (OtakuJo @ July 21 2009, 10:25 am)
Quote (Splurk @ July 21 2009, 12:29 am)

The awful year? What?

mm now I got to remember when was that...? 1994 or 1996...? There was one year when all the queen's offspring were acting up or something and she referred to that year as her "annus horribilis" -- which of course led to the inevitable Clive James joke about Her Majesty having a horrible anus, or something.

Although there is a good chance that "Annus" and "Anus" are etymologically related because the latter means "old woman" but that's another story entirely.
Oh, the point is, there is a noun 'anus' being 'ring' or 'that one ring in your arse' (penis also means 'tail'), and a noun 'anus' meaning 'old woman', but there are two subtleties:

1: Latin is a highly inflected language, words change form to reflect their role in the sentence, and there are different types of patterns called 'declension classes' and the 'arse' one is in a different one than the 'old woman', they just in the nominative singular form, the form typically used for citations are the same. So if you said 'I give this to the arse' one would say 'hoc ano dono' and to the old woman 'hoc anui dono'. Showing that the words come from a different root but just happen to by coincidence resemble each other in two of their 12 forms.
2: In Latin, vowel length is phonemic and destinguishes words, but it's often not written down. Properly '?nus' means 'ring' and 'anus' 'old woman'. The former having a long a. Long consonant length is written down as in 'annus'.

Quote
I think Australian is a mix of C0ckney and Irish (and a few other things to a lesser extent) because of the convicts -- whereas NZ especially Southland accent has a tad more Scottish influence. Or something.
Surely there are different types of Aussie English though?

Quote

Yup. I get what you're saying. There is still an expectation that women should be GIRLY and men should be MANLY.
I'd rather see it as not splitting it into these things. But to for instance say that as a matter of fact, more females than males tend to be of the nurturing type.

Quote
Funny thing though that's not likely to change is I'm still someone for whom the number 16 is female. Although that said I'm not at all offended if mistaken for a guy. Each time just becomes another funny story.
I think that on the internet, people are going to assume you're a guy into proven otherwise.

It's an interesting and disgusting bias, it's a man's world, people shall assume any thing that lacks any evidence for any gender is a guy. Because people seem to be impossible to not assume a gender (they are quite possible to not assume any musical taste), take it like this. If you draw a stick figure out of five lines and a circle, people shall think it's a guy unless you provide some female evidence, like female hair or boobs. You don't need male hair to make it a guy. Or if people speak of 'a friend' it shall be assumed a guy until proven a female by some words like 'her'.

As I'm gender blind, a lot of comic figures intended as guys by authors who draw guys like blank templates and girls like overly stereotype females, eyelashes, bows and all (Donald Duck) I experience the guys as having no gender, and the females as female.

Quote
Well you just about managed to make me forget about Julian Bashir. In a topic about Julian Bashir. Given that I have to confess to usually being all obsessed and stuff, that's not a bad feat! ;)
I do nothing but think about Julian Bashir all day, but Garak's kind of interesting too.

OtakuJo

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Report this Jul. 22 2009, 1:35 am

* awright. 4th vs 2nd declension... I can see where you're coming from there. I guess I just had the funny (not entirely surprising) associations on first reading the word. Like "possum" -- I can -- which of course in English is a furry, usually grey marsupial as seen in the movie Willow. ^_^
That kind of thing tends to stick in one's head. In mine, anyway... because thinking immature thoughts can sometimes be a lot of fun!!

* Aussie English: As the "European" populations of Australia and New Zealand are relatively new compared to England, there is very little distinguishable difference within them. -- Not so much that you would automatically be able to tell straight off what part of the country someone is from -- However, there are just very slight differences in the way some words are pronounced. In Sydney, "Castle" and "Dance" are with more of an AAAHHH sound. In Melbourne, a in Castle is more like "cat" and Dance, more like something perhaps partway between American and Yorkshire pronounciations. (A little inaccurate but that's the best description I can come up with at this stage.) But apart from the occasional word the differences are pretty much negligible compared to somewhere like England, or for example Japanese "ben" or dialects. There's little likelihood of being able to tell just by listening precisely where someone is from.

* Well I recently "escaped" from life in a major tourist town! yikes. So of course there were all sorts of people from all sorts of countries! Oh yeah. And there was always UKTv as well. BBC and Thames and IKTV commission some good telly (sometimes) i think.

* Julian is fave character and Garak is second fave. :) I don't think that changes even though the rest of my "top ten" tend to shift around a little more. Mind you, after a day of studying postgrad museum stuff I do like to take an opportunity to be "unintelligent" for a bit!! Mind you, mind you, Having said that... Star Trek characters are a more interesting topic even to be "intelligent" (or the opposite) about than collection management policy.

OtakuJo

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POSTS: 16362

Report this Jul. 22 2009, 8:55 am

So anyway excuse the double posting...

The question still exists although it got a little buried the previous time, does anyone know of any good books and stuff which (in some way) feature Dr. Bashir? Even if he doesn't have a spot on the cover-art or in the back cover blurb.

~Always out for new stuff to read in the future.

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