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Space exploration is stagnant

thevoyagerdude

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 1227

Report this Nov. 27 2008, 2:34 am

We keep hearing about return missions to the moon and manned missions to Mars but since trips like those and visits to the international space station will be reserved for the few (who are no better then you or I) and the super rich it is hard for regular people to get involved in the discussion or even care about it.

I honestly feel that we need to spend more money on space telescopes and the like so we can at least have a hope of finding another planet that is similar to Earth and/or has some sort of higher life form on it. If we have a destination like that to shoot for then the mother of invention, (necessity) will take over and we will get new technologies to travel through space.

Traveling at the speed of light is not feasible even if it were possible since it would take many many light years to reach even the closest star. ?I would like to see something along the lines of wormhole research and/or a sub-space propulsion system that will let us move through space faster.

Unfortunately with the way things are in the world today I don't see anything positive happening in my lifetime. ? :cry:

lanceromega

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3859

Report this Nov. 28 2008, 2:06 pm

Quote (thevoyagerdude @ Nov. 26 2008, 3:34 am)
We keep hearing about return missions to the moon and manned missions to Mars but since trips like those and visits to the international space station will be reserved for the few (who are no better then you or I) and the super rich it is hard for regular people to get involved in the discussion or even care about it.

I honestly feel that we need to spend more money on space telescopes and the like so we can at least have a hope of finding another planet that is similar to Earth and/or has some sort of higher life form on it. If we have a destination like that to shoot for then the mother of invention, (necessity) will take over and we will get new technologies to travel through space.

Traveling at the speed of light is not feasible even if it were possible since it would take many many light years to reach even the closest star. ?I would like to see something along the lines of wormhole research and/or a sub-space propulsion system that will let us move through space faster.

Unfortunately with the way things are in the world today I don't see anything positive happening in my lifetime. ? :cry:

Your approach is a bit flawed. While it would be nice to find another earthlike planet, it very likely that such a world would have it own lifeform and intelligent life.

Even if we had the means to get there it, to colonize it would be displacing the inhabitant , we would be reliving the same cruel and bloody era of colonial expansion on earth...

Research on wormhole technology means being able to generate power far beyond what we have avaliable, to open and keep a wormhole stable enought for transport would require the mass energy of jupiter!!!!

Such power generation will not occur for 100's if not 1000's  of year and would require us tapping the resources of the entire solar system if not neighboring solar systems.

Other means of FTL travel are just as limiting.

As it goes we may not have 1000's of years to wait, mankind need to learn to adapt to outerspace and colonize the other planets in our solar system. Mar and venus can be terraformed, colonizes on Ceres would provide water needed to explore and colonize the other solar systems and asteriod belt.

Our limited exploration of out space has already pay off in many ways. All of the IC and transistor we use in our electronic devices originate in the need to minaturized and reduce the weight of components for rockets. Rockets lead to first long term Communication satellites that allow us to have phone service around the world or GPS systems to guide our travel on earth.

The fact is we need to develop space travel now and at a level we are capable of, or we never may get a chance to travel to the stars, all it take is one rogue asteriod that we cannot stop or the collapse of our industrial complex due to us running out of raw material ( at the present level of consumpation, we will run out of copper, and other important metals in about 30 years).

The moon is a good first step, as we finally master fusion technology the moon is primary source of Helium 3. This isotope of Helium would be fuel for a type of fusion process with low level of radiation and free from any type of major runaway reaction. On earth it is rare, while there are millions of tons in the lunar soil.

Also the moon would allow us to build rail systems that could be use to fire cargo pods into mar obrit supplying any future mars mission.

From mars we can explore the outer solar system and from the Oort cloud the first human starships we very likely reach the alpha centaur.

But waiting till we have warp or ftl drive is not really an option.

Whitestar7

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 419

Report this Dec. 01 2008, 3:24 am

Quote (lanceromega @ Nov. 27 2008, 3:06 pm)
Quote (thevoyagerdude @ Nov. 26 2008, 3:34 am)
We keep hearing about return missions to the moon and manned missions to Mars but since trips like those and visits to the international space station will be reserved for the few (who are no better then you or I) and the super rich it is hard for regular people to get involved in the discussion or even care about it.

I honestly feel that we need to spend more money on space telescopes and the like so we can at least have a hope of finding another planet that is similar to Earth and/or has some sort of higher life form on it. If we have a destination like that to shoot for then the mother of invention, (necessity) will take over and we will get new technologies to travel through space.

Traveling at the speed of light is not feasible even if it were possible since it would take many many light years to reach even the closest star. ?I would like to see something along the lines of wormhole research and/or a sub-space propulsion system that will let us move through space faster.

Unfortunately with the way things are in the world today I don't see anything positive happening in my lifetime. ? :cry:

Your approach is a bit flawed. While it would be nice to find another earthlike planet, it very likely that such a world would have it own lifeform and intelligent life.

Even if we had the means to get there it, to colonize it would be displacing the inhabitant , we would be reliving the same cruel and bloody era of colonial expansion on earth...

Research on wormhole technology means being able to generate power far beyond what we have avaliable, to open and keep a wormhole stable enought for transport would require the mass energy of jupiter!!!!

Such power generation will not occur for 100's if not 1000's ¿of year and would require us tapping the resources of the entire solar system if not neighboring solar systems.

Other means of FTL travel are just as limiting.

As it goes we may not have 1000's of years to wait, mankind need to learn to adapt to outerspace and colonize the other planets in our solar system. Mar and venus can be terraformed, colonizes on Ceres would provide water needed to explore and colonize the other solar systems and asteriod belt.

Our limited exploration of out space has already pay off in many ways. All of the IC and transistor we use in our electronic devices originate in the need to minaturized and reduce the weight of components for rockets. Rockets lead to first long term Communication satellites that allow us to have phone service around the world or GPS systems to guide our travel on earth.

The fact is we need to develop space travel now and at a level we are capable of, or we never may get a chance to travel to the stars, all it take is one rogue asteriod that we cannot stop or the collapse of our industrial complex due to us running out of raw material ( at the present level of consumpation, we will run out of copper, and other important metals in about 30 years).

The moon is a good first step, as we finally master fusion technology the moon is primary source of Helium 3. This isotope of Helium would be fuel for a type of fusion process with low level of radiation and free from any type of major runaway reaction. On earth it is rare, while there are millions of tons in the lunar soil.

Also the moon would allow us to build rail systems that could be use to fire cargo pods into mar obrit supplying any future mars mission.

From mars we can explore the outer solar system and from the Oort cloud the first human starships we very likely reach the alpha centaur.

But waiting till we have warp or ftl drive is not really an option.

Actually, scientists have already found an Earth-like planet sometime on April 25, 2007.

A twin for planet Earth?
EUROPEAN astronomers may have made the most important scientific discovery of the new millennium. The scientists believe they have detected an Earth-like planet circling a red dwarf star a mere 20 light-years away.

That's roughly 120 trillion miles for those calculating the frequent flier points between here and the heart of the constellation Libra.

Now dubbed 581c - a name only a tax accountant could love - it is one-third of a planetary system circling a star called Gilese 581.

Little is known about the planet besides the fact that it is 50 percent larger than Earth and five times heavier. Its temperature is believed to range between 32 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Scientists also suspect the presence of an atmosphere and water, both essential elements for life as we know it.

In the last decade, astronomers have discovered roughly 200 planets outside our solar system, but 581c is the first to bear even a superficial resemblance to our own. There's a lot of excitement about that, even though it is unlikely that a human will ever set foot on that rocky world.

Just the possibility of another habitable planet is so tantalizing that scientists will devote countless hours to studying every piece of data about it until we can answer one question: Do we have neighbors on 581c?

With the discovery of this Earth-like world, scientists believe it is only a matter of time before similar planets are discovered, perhaps even closer to us than 581c.


See link:

http://groups.google.com/group....c?pli=1


'Second Earth' found, 20 light years away
Scientists have discovered a warm and rocky "second Earth" circling a star, a find they believe dramatically boosts the prospects that we are not alone.

The planet is the most Earth-like ever spotted and is thought to have perfect conditions for water, an essential ingredient for life. Researchers detected the planet orbiting one of Earth's nearest stars, a cool red dwarf called Gliese 581, 20 light years away in the constellation of Libra.

Measurements of the planet's celestial path suggest it is 1¿ times the size of our home planet, and orbits close to its sun, with a year of just 13 days. The planet's orbit brings it 14 times closer to its star than Earth is to the sun. But Gliese 581 burns at only 3,000C, half the temperature of our own sun, making conditions on the planet comfortable for life, with average ground temperatures estimated at 0 to 40C. Researchers claim the planet is likely to have an atmosphere. The discovery follows a three-year search for habitable planets by the European Southern Observatory at La Silla in Chile.

"We wouldn't be surprised if there is life on this planet," said Stephane Udry, an astronomer on the project at the Geneva Observatory in Switzerland.

Two years ago, the same team discovered a giant Neptune-sized planet orbiting Gliese 581. A closer look revealed the latest planetary discovery, along with a third, larger planet that orbits the star every 84 days. The planets have been named after their star, with the most earthlike called Gliese 581c. The team spotted the planet by searching the "habitable zone".


See link:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science....oration


New 'super-Earth' found in space
Astronomers have found the most Earth-like planet outside our Solar System to date, a world which could have water running on its surface. The planet orbits the faint star Gliese 581, which is 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra.

Scientists made the discovery using the Eso 3.6m Telescope in Chile.

They say the benign temperatures on the planet mean any water there could exist in liquid form, and this raises the chances it could also harbour life.

"We have estimated that the mean temperature of this 'super-Earth' lies between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius, and water would thus be liquid," explained Stephane Udry of the Geneva Observatory, lead author of the scientific paper reporting the result.

"Moreover, its radius should be only 1.5 times the Earth's radius, and models predict that the planet should be either rocky - like our Earth - or covered with oceans."

Xavier Delfosse, a member of the team from Grenoble University, added: "Liquid water is critical to life as we know it."

He believes the planet may now become a very important target for future space missions dedicated to the search for extra-terrestrial life.

These missions will put telescopes in space that can discern the tell-tale light "signatures" that might be associated with biological processes.

The observatories would seek to identify trace atmospheric gases such as methane, and even markers for chlorophyll, the pigment in Earth plants that plays a critical role in photosynthesis.

'Indirect' detection

The exoplanet - as astronomers call planets around a star other than the Sun - is the smallest yet found, and has been given the designation Gliese 581 c.

It completes a full orbit of its parent star in just 13 days.

Indeed, it is 14 times closer to its star than the Earth is to our Sun.

However, given that the host star is smaller and colder than the Sun - and thus less luminous - the planet nevertheless lies in the "habitable zone", the region around a star where water could be liquid.

Gliese 581 c was identified at the European Southern Observatory (Eso) facility at La Silla in the Atacama Desert.

To make their discovery, researchers used a very sensitive instrument that can measure tiny changes in the velocity of a star as it experiences the gravitational tug of a nearby planet.

Astronomers are stuck with such indirect methods of detection because current telescope technology struggles to image very distant and faint objects - especially when they orbit close to the glare of a star.

The Gliese 581 system has now yielded three planets: the new super-Earth, a 15 Earth-mass planet (Gliese 581 b) orbiting even closer to the parent star, and an eight Earth-mass planet that lies further out (Gliese 581 d).

The latest discovery has created tremendous excitement among scientists.

Of the more than 200 exoplanets so far discovered, a great many are Jupiter-like gas giants that experience blazing temperatures because they orbit close in to much hotter stars.

The Gliese 581 super-Earth is in what scientists also sometimes call the "Goldilocks Zone", where temperatures "are just right" for life to have a chance to exist.

Commenting on the discovery, Alison Boyle, the curator of astronomy at London's Science Museum, said: "Of all the planets we've found around other stars, this is the one that looks as though it might have the right ingredients for life.

"It's 20 light-years away and so we won't be going there anytime soon, but with new kinds of propulsion technology that could change in the future. And obviously we'll be training some powerful telescopes on it to see what we can see," she told BBC News.

"'Is there life anywhere else?' is a fundamental question we all ask."

Professor Glenn White at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is helping to develop the European Space Agency's Darwin mission, which will scan the nearby Universe, looking for signs of life on Earth-like planets. He said: "This is an important step in the search for true Earth-like exoplanets.

"As the methods become more and more refined, astronomers are narrowing in on the ultimate goal - the detection of a true Earth-like planet elsewhere.

"Obviously this newly discovered planet and its companions in the Gliese 581 system will become prominent targets for missions like Esa's Darwin and Nasa's Terrestrial planet Finder when they fly in about a decade."


See link:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6589157.stm


This sounds very exciting! :cool: While it remains to be seen if there is any vegetation and plant life, as well as any alien lifeforms on that planet, this nonetheless could be the solution to the global warming problem, that planet could be our salvation. Also, I think its equally important that we do everything we can to repair the damage we've done to our planet, but at least we have another prospective home to go to. In a poetic kind of way, this is kind of mirroring what is happening in Ron Moore's Battlestar Galactica. Except in our case, we will be traveling through space and eventually living on New Earth/Second Earth/Earth 2, etc. One thing is certain, if it turns out that that planet has no aliens on it, humanity will begin to colonize it and the first law that they should set into place is to ban all kinds of technologies and machinery that will cause harmful to the planet's atmosphere, and no nuclear bomb testing of any kind. It's high-time we learn the lessons from our planet and not repeat the same mistakes of our sorted past. While we're a long way off from developing an Alcubierre Warp Drive, we will have to develop suspended animation chambers for our space explorers which suspend the aging process when traveling huge distances. Looks like humanity may have a second chance to get it right after all. Here's hoping. <>

lanceromega

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3859

Report this Dec. 01 2008, 10:34 am

Quote (Whitestar7 @ Nov. 30 2008, 4:24 am)
Quote (lanceromega @ Nov. 27 2008, 3:06 pm)
Quote (thevoyagerdude @ Nov. 26 2008, 3:34 am)
We keep hearing about return missions to the moon and manned missions to Mars but since trips like those and visits to the international space station will be reserved for the few (who are no better then you or I) and the super rich it is hard for regular people to get involved in the discussion or even care about it.

I honestly feel that we need to spend more money on space telescopes and the like so we can at least have a hope of finding another planet that is similar to Earth and/or has some sort of higher life form on it. If we have a destination like that to shoot for then the mother of invention, (necessity) will take over and we will get new technologies to travel through space.

Traveling at the speed of light is not feasible even if it were possible since it would take many many light years to reach even the closest star. ?I would like to see something along the lines of wormhole research and/or a sub-space propulsion system that will let us move through space faster.

Unfortunately with the way things are in the world today I don't see anything positive happening in my lifetime. ? :cry:

Your approach is a bit flawed. While it would be nice to find another earthlike planet, it very likely that such a world would have it own lifeform and intelligent life.

Even if we had the means to get there it, to colonize it would be displacing the inhabitant , we would be reliving the same cruel and bloody era of colonial expansion on earth...

Research on wormhole technology means being able to generate power far beyond what we have avaliable, to open and keep a wormhole stable enought for transport would require the mass energy of jupiter!!!!

Such power generation will not occur for 100's if not 1000's ?of year and would require us tapping the resources of the entire solar system if not neighboring solar systems.

Other means of FTL travel are just as limiting.

As it goes we may not have 1000's of years to wait, mankind need to learn to adapt to outerspace and colonize the other planets in our solar system. Mar and venus can be terraformed, colonizes on Ceres would provide water needed to explore and colonize the other solar systems and asteriod belt.

Our limited exploration of out space has already pay off in many ways. All of the IC and transistor we use in our electronic devices originate in the need to minaturized and reduce the weight of components for rockets. Rockets lead to first long term Communication satellites that allow us to have phone service around the world or GPS systems to guide our travel on earth.

The fact is we need to develop space travel now and at a level we are capable of, or we never may get a chance to travel to the stars, all it take is one rogue asteriod that we cannot stop or the collapse of our industrial complex due to us running out of raw material ( at the present level of consumpation, we will run out of copper, and other important metals in about 30 years).

The moon is a good first step, as we finally master fusion technology the moon is primary source of Helium 3. This isotope of Helium would be fuel for a type of fusion process with low level of radiation and free from any type of major runaway reaction. On earth it is rare, while there are millions of tons in the lunar soil.

Also the moon would allow us to build rail systems that could be use to fire cargo pods into mar obrit supplying any future mars mission.

From mars we can explore the outer solar system and from the Oort cloud the first human starships we very likely reach the alpha centaur.

But waiting till we have warp or ftl drive is not really an option.

Actually, scientists have already found an Earth-like planet sometime on April 25, 2007.

A twin for planet Earth?
EUROPEAN astronomers may have made the most important scientific discovery of the new millennium. The scientists believe they have detected an Earth-like planet circling a red dwarf star a mere 20 light-years away.

That's roughly 120 trillion miles for those calculating the frequent flier points between here and the heart of the constellation Libra.

Now dubbed 581c - a name only a tax accountant could love - it is one-third of a planetary system circling a star called Gilese 581.

Little is known about the planet besides the fact that it is 50 percent larger than Earth and five times heavier. Its temperature is believed to range between 32 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Scientists also suspect the presence of an atmosphere and water, both essential elements for life as we know it.

In the last decade, astronomers have discovered roughly 200 planets outside our solar system, but 581c is the first to bear even a superficial resemblance to our own. There's a lot of excitement about that, even though it is unlikely that a human will ever set foot on that rocky world.

Just the possibility of another habitable planet is so tantalizing that scientists will devote countless hours to studying every piece of data about it until we can answer one question: Do we have neighbors on 581c?

With the discovery of this Earth-like world, scientists believe it is only a matter of time before similar planets are discovered, perhaps even closer to us than 581c.


See link:

http://groups.google.com/group....c?pli=1


'Second Earth' found, 20 light years away
Scientists have discovered a warm and rocky "second Earth" circling a star, a find they believe dramatically boosts the prospects that we are not alone.

The planet is the most Earth-like ever spotted and is thought to have perfect conditions for water, an essential ingredient for life. Researchers detected the planet orbiting one of Earth's nearest stars, a cool red dwarf called Gliese 581, 20 light years away in the constellation of Libra.

Measurements of the planet's celestial path suggest it is 1? times the size of our home planet, and orbits close to its sun, with a year of just 13 days. The planet's orbit brings it 14 times closer to its star than Earth is to the sun. But Gliese 581 burns at only 3,000C, half the temperature of our own sun, making conditions on the planet comfortable for life, with average ground temperatures estimated at 0 to 40C. Researchers claim the planet is likely to have an atmosphere. The discovery follows a three-year search for habitable planets by the European Southern Observatory at La Silla in Chile.

"We wouldn't be surprised if there is life on this planet," said Stephane Udry, an astronomer on the project at the Geneva Observatory in Switzerland.

Two years ago, the same team discovered a giant Neptune-sized planet orbiting Gliese 581. A closer look revealed the latest planetary discovery, along with a third, larger planet that orbits the star every 84 days. The planets have been named after their star, with the most earthlike called Gliese 581c. The team spotted the planet by searching the "habitable zone".


See link:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science....oration


New 'super-Earth' found in space
Astronomers have found the most Earth-like planet outside our Solar System to date, a world which could have water running on its surface. The planet orbits the faint star Gliese 581, which is 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra.

Scientists made the discovery using the Eso 3.6m Telescope in Chile.

They say the benign temperatures on the planet mean any water there could exist in liquid form, and this raises the chances it could also harbour life.

"We have estimated that the mean temperature of this 'super-Earth' lies between 0 and 40 degrees Celsius, and water would thus be liquid," explained Stephane Udry of the Geneva Observatory, lead author of the scientific paper reporting the result.

"Moreover, its radius should be only 1.5 times the Earth's radius, and models predict that the planet should be either rocky - like our Earth - or covered with oceans."

Xavier Delfosse, a member of the team from Grenoble University, added: "Liquid water is critical to life as we know it."

He believes the planet may now become a very important target for future space missions dedicated to the search for extra-terrestrial life.

These missions will put telescopes in space that can discern the tell-tale light "signatures" that might be associated with biological processes.

The observatories would seek to identify trace atmospheric gases such as methane, and even markers for chlorophyll, the pigment in Earth plants that plays a critical role in photosynthesis.

'Indirect' detection

The exoplanet - as astronomers call planets around a star other than the Sun - is the smallest yet found, and has been given the designation Gliese 581 c.

It completes a full orbit of its parent star in just 13 days.

Indeed, it is 14 times closer to its star than the Earth is to our Sun.

However, given that the host star is smaller and colder than the Sun - and thus less luminous - the planet nevertheless lies in the "habitable zone", the region around a star where water could be liquid.

Gliese 581 c was identified at the European Southern Observatory (Eso) facility at La Silla in the Atacama Desert.

To make their discovery, researchers used a very sensitive instrument that can measure tiny changes in the velocity of a star as it experiences the gravitational tug of a nearby planet.

Astronomers are stuck with such indirect methods of detection because current telescope technology struggles to image very distant and faint objects - especially when they orbit close to the glare of a star.

The Gliese 581 system has now yielded three planets: the new super-Earth, a 15 Earth-mass planet (Gliese 581 b) orbiting even closer to the parent star, and an eight Earth-mass planet that lies further out (Gliese 581 d).

The latest discovery has created tremendous excitement among scientists.

Of the more than 200 exoplanets so far discovered, a great many are Jupiter-like gas giants that experience blazing temperatures because they orbit close in to much hotter stars.

The Gliese 581 super-Earth is in what scientists also sometimes call the "Goldilocks Zone", where temperatures "are just right" for life to have a chance to exist.

Commenting on the discovery, Alison Boyle, the curator of astronomy at London's Science Museum, said: "Of all the planets we've found around other stars, this is the one that looks as though it might have the right ingredients for life.

"It's 20 light-years away and so we won't be going there anytime soon, but with new kinds of propulsion technology that could change in the future. And obviously we'll be training some powerful telescopes on it to see what we can see," she told BBC News.

"'Is there life anywhere else?' is a fundamental question we all ask."

Professor Glenn White at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is helping to develop the European Space Agency's Darwin mission, which will scan the nearby Universe, looking for signs of life on Earth-like planets. He said: "This is an important step in the search for true Earth-like exoplanets.

"As the methods become more and more refined, astronomers are narrowing in on the ultimate goal - the detection of a true Earth-like planet elsewhere.

"Obviously this newly discovered planet and its companions in the Gliese 581 system will become prominent targets for missions like Esa's Darwin and Nasa's Terrestrial planet Finder when they fly in about a decade."


See link:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6589157.stm


This sounds very exciting! :cool: While it remains to be seen if there is any vegetation and plant life, as well as any alien lifeforms on that planet, this nonetheless could be the solution to the global warming problem, that planet could be our salvation. Also, I think its equally important that we do everything we can to repair the damage we've done to our planet, but at least we have another prospective home to go to. In a poetic kind of way, this is kind of mirroring what is happening in Ron Moore's Battlestar Galactica. Except in our case, we will be traveling through space and eventually living on New Earth/Second Earth/Earth 2, etc. One thing is certain, if it turns out that that planet has no aliens on it, humanity will begin to colonize it and the first law that they should set into place is to ban all kinds of technologies and machinery that will cause harmful to the planet's atmosphere, and no nuclear bomb testing of any kind. It's high-time we learn the lessons from our planet and not repeat the same mistakes of our sorted past. While we're a long way off from developing an Alcubierre Warp Drive, we will have to develop suspended animation chambers for our space explorers which suspend the aging process when traveling huge distances. Looks like humanity may have a second chance to get it right after all. Here's hoping. <>

We are along bit away from launching any kind of mission to even the closest star much less to any of the planets you listed.

Even present research into methods of  suspended animation have not yield anywhere near the lenght of time required for such a journey at the speed we can presently obtain.

Alot of research has to be done on space travel and techologies need for long term survival in outer space.
And if we can perfect these technologies we will very likely use them to especial obrital colonies and even colonies on the various planets and moon within our own solar system.

Global warming will not be solved by colonization, even if we can travel ftl and create colonies on other worlds, it would require the resources of whole solar system to move enought people off this world to new homes and decades if not centuries to accomplish this.

Global warming can only be solved by figuring out how to remove the excess greenhouse gases from the atomsphere, at this point nature will need a massive assist, first we need to cutdown on release of green house gases, next we going to need to figure way to remove co2 from the atomsphere quickly.

But it nice to know that there are other possible inhabited worlds out there.

Whitestar7

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 419

Report this Dec. 01 2008, 12:24 pm

Quote (lanceromega @ Nov. 30 2008, 11:34 am)
Global warming will not be solved by colonization, even if we can travel ftl and create colonies on other worlds, it would require the resources of whole solar system to move enought people off this world to new homes and decades if not centuries to accomplish this.


Agreed. All the more reason why we should eventually get the colonization of other planets or orbital stations started as soon as possible. Nothing good comes easy, my friend. :)

Quote (lanceromega @ Nov. 27 2008, 3:06 pm)
Global warming can only be solved by figuring out how to remove the excess greenhouse gases from the atomsphere, at this point nature will need a massive assist, first we need to cutdown on release of green house gases, next we going to need to figure way to remove co2 from the atomsphere quickly.


I don't think you can stop or prevent global warming, the best we can do is slow it down. Nonetheless, I am interested in learning on how you think it could be solved. Any ideas?

Quote (lanceromega @ Nov. 27 2008, 3:06 pm)
But it nice to know that there are other possible inhabited worlds out there.


Indeed. :cool:

GrandLunar2007

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 1092

Report this Dec. 02 2008, 8:14 am

Quote
We keep hearing about return missions to the moon and manned missions to Mars but since trips like those and visits to the international space station will be reserved for the few (who are no better then you or I) and the super rich it is hard for regular people to get involved in the discussion or even care about it


During the shuttle's early days, "regular" people did get into space. See if you can find a book called "Space Shuttle: The First 20 Years".

Remember that we're still in our infancy with space exploration. We're not at a level yet were the "common man" can access space.

Long before we plan on visiting other solar systems, there's still plenty of real estate in our own neighborhood; we have the moon, Mars, and the moons of other planets.
As Lance mentioned, we could terraform Venus, as well as Mars.

We can also build L5 colonies; huge megastructures that are like cities in space.

Finding Earth-like worlds has begun, as posted by WhiteStar.
New means for doing so are not that far ahead.

Concerning the title to this thread, space exploration is far from stagnant.
It's simply done mostly by our machines, or from Earth: Cassini is still making findings at Saturn, New Horizons is on it's way to Pluto and beyond, the Voyagers are still transmitting from the edge of our solar system, our Mars rovers and landers are still making findings on this planet, new probes are orbiting the moon for studies that we'll put to use on our return, Dawn is making it's way to the asteroid belt, and our telescopes are still adding to our knowledge of the universe.

Don't underestimate what we already have!

blankenship

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 1632

Report this Dec. 06 2008, 8:27 pm

That's because it's to frikin far to go to planets in this system where there is nothing for you people to live on anyway.

spacemonster

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 2423

Report this Dec. 08 2008, 5:28 am

I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time.  Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Whitestar7

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 419

Report this Dec. 08 2008, 9:52 am

Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

lanceromega

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POSTS: 3859

Report this Dec. 09 2008, 12:03 pm

Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles?  :O

The Question isn't funding but one of engineering, space travel is not profitable, not by a long shot and we donot have the means for cheap space travel at this time.

Even when it does become profitable ( as we begin to run out of resources like metals such as copper and tungsten) it very likely that we will be using alot of robotic space craft for mission to near space asteriods and moon till we come up with either a space elevator or safe clean fusion rockets.

Whitestar7

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 419

Report this Dec. 09 2008, 12:39 pm

Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:03 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles? ¿:O

No, I was not referring to corporations, only individual eccentric billionaires. ;)

lanceromega

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3859

Report this Dec. 10 2008, 9:10 pm

Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:39 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:03 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles? ?:O

No, I was not referring to corporations, only individual eccentric billionaires. ;)

You need a lot more than a hand full of individual eccentric billionaires.  :(  wish it was that easy....

Whitestar7

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 419

Report this Dec. 10 2008, 9:18 pm

Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 09 2008, 10:10 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:39 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:03 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles? ?:O

No, I was not referring to corporations, only individual eccentric billionaires. ;)

You need a lot more than a hand full of individual eccentric billionaires. ?:( ?wish it was that easy....

True, but nothing good comes easy, my friend. :)  And yes, we would need a lot more than a few eccentric billionaires. I figure that for space exploration to be practical, it first must become affordable. Any ideas?

BirdofPrey101

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3896

Report this Dec. 10 2008, 11:49 pm

Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 10 2008, 9:18 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 09 2008, 10:10 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:39 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:03 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles? ?:O

No, I was not referring to corporations, only individual eccentric billionaires. ;)

You need a lot more than a hand full of individual eccentric billionaires. ?:( ?wish it was that easy....

True, but nothing good comes easy, my friend. :) ¿And yes, we would need a lot more than a few eccentric billionaires. I figure that for space exploration to be practical, it first must become affordable. Any ideas?

Either way it goes, you're still going to need corporate backing.
Sure, several eccentric billionaires could fund the project, still, some company has to build it.....no doubt one owned by one of those funding the project...it's just a circle!

lanceromega

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 3859

Report this Dec. 11 2008, 1:11 pm

Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 09 2008, 10:18 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 09 2008, 10:10 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:39 pm)
Quote (lanceromega @ Dec. 08 2008, 1:03 pm)
Quote (Whitestar7 @ Dec. 07 2008, 10:52 am)
Quote (spacemonster @ Dec. 07 2008, 6:28 am)
I'd say private sponsorship is going to pave the way eventually, but even so it will take time. ?Problem with government programs (particularly NASA) are that they have become so bloated with bureaucracy that it's difficult for them to get anything accomplished in a timely affordable budget.

Well said, Spacemonster. Private funding is the only way to go if we are ever going to venture out to the stars. :)

private funding? you mean trust the same corporations that are responible for global warming and exploding Gas tanks on Automobiles? ?:O

No, I was not referring to corporations, only individual eccentric billionaires. ;)

You need a lot more than a hand full of individual eccentric billionaires. ?:( ?wish it was that easy....

True, but nothing good comes easy, my friend. :) ¿And yes, we would need a lot more than a few eccentric billionaires. I figure that for space exploration to be practical, it first must become affordable. Any ideas?

Well if affordal space travel becomes a reality it will be due to miltary efforts to gain the high ground.

Missile research lead to the boom in transistor and micro circuits, as well as all our present generation of rockets.

The first long tend space station was now found to have been secert russian spy station that they launch before the invention of spy satellites by the US.

The minute one of the miltary powers decide to place a space station on the moon that will open up the flood gates to space travel both civilian and miltary to the lunar surface.

Hate to say it but that the way i see it happening.

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