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Five Years on Mars

Trekwolf164

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Report this Apr. 08 2011, 7:47 am

The first post has the NASA link you can see the images captured there.

Trekwolf164

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POSTS: 32043

Report this Apr. 15 2011, 7:29 am

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Opportunity Just Four Miles from Endeavour Rim - sols 2560-2565, April 07-12, 2011:


Opportunity continues the trek towards Endeavour crater with less than 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) to go before reaching the first landfall on the rim of Endeavour crater.


The rover drove on Sols 2560, 2561 and 2562 (April 7, 8 and 9, 2011), covering over 250 meters (820 feet) to the southeast. The rover's right front wheel motor currents have settled down to more reasonable levels.


Opportunity refined its attitude knowledge with a calibration activity on its inertial measurement unit (IMU). With the pace of driving, these calibrations are done more frequently. The drive planned for Sol 2565 (April 12, 2011), did not occur because a Deep Space Network antenna tracking issue prevented the commands from reaching the rover.


As of Sol 2565 (April 12, 2011), solar array energy production was 390 watt-hours with an elevated atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.919 and a solar array dust factor of 0.5355.


Total odometry is 27,818.48 meters (27.82 kilometers, or 17.29 miles).


Opportunity Update Archive


Trekwolf164

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Report this Apr. 29 2011, 7:56 am

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Making Progress to Endeavour Crater - sols 2566-2572, April 13-19, 2011:


Opportunity continues the trek towards Endeavour crater with under 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) to go before reaching the first landfall on the rim of Endeavour crater.


The rover drove on Sols 2569 and 2572 (April 16 and 19, 2011), gaining an additional 221 meters (725 feet) to the southeast. The rover's right front wheel motor currents continue to measure in at reasonable levels. In addition to driving, a notable activity included staying up overnight in the Sol 2570 (April 17, 2011), plan in order to provide the power subsystem with the data they need to update the capacity estimate of the battery.


As of Sol 2572 (April 19, 2011), solar array energy production was 400 watt-hours with an elevated atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.922 and a solar array dust factor of 0.5414.


Total odometry is 28,040.18 meters (28.04 kilometers, or 17.42 miles).


Opportunity Update Archive


Trekwolf164

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Report this May. 06 2011, 12:49 pm

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Opportunity Images Small Craters - sols 2581-2587, April 28 - May 4, 2011:


Opportunity continues the trek towards Endeavour crater with a brief sojourn through a small field of young impact craters.


In honor of the 50th anniversary of the first American into space, Alan Shepard, the Mars Exploration Rover project informally named the craters in this impact field after the spacecraft of the NASA Mercury Program.


On Sol 2581 (April 28, 2011), Opportunity began the approach to the crater field with a 110-meter (360-foot) drive to the southeast. On Sol 2583 (April 31, 2011), the rover cautiously navigated near the craters with a drive of just over 120 meters (394 feet). On Sol 2585 (May 2, 2011), Opportunity drove 28 meters (92 feet) due south heading between the two largest craters, named "Friendship 7" and "Freedom 7." On the next sol, the rover made a 7-meter (23-foot) approach toward the crater Freedom 7 to carefully image the interior. On the next sol, Opportunity performed a cleaver "dog leg" maneuver first due south, then due east to safely navigate around and out of the crater field, while catching opportunities for some close-up imaging of the craters.


The rover's right front wheel continues to show only modestly elevated motor currents. However, the project continues to track this. The plan ahead is more driving as Opportunity leaves these carters behind and heads towards Endeavour, some 4.5 kilometers (2.8 miles) away.


As of Sol 2587 (May 4, 2011), solar array energy production was 367 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.819 and a solar array dust factor of 0.510.


Total odometry is 28,708.06 meters (28.71 kilometers, or 17.84 miles).


Opportunity Update Archive


Trekwolf164

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Report this May. 16 2011, 8:29 pm

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Opportunity Past 18-Mile Mark! - sols 2588-2594, May 4-12, 2011:


Opportunity continues the trek towards Endeavour crater after a brief jog last week through a small field of young impact craters, named in honor after the spacecraft of the NASA Mercury Program.


On Sol 2588 (May 5, 2011), Opportunity headed east with a drive of over 126 meters (413 feet). On Sol 2589 (May 6, 2011), the rover drove further east achieving almost 129 meters (423 feet). On Sol 2592 (May 10, 2011), Opportunity again achieved another long drive to the east covering another 126 meters (413 feet). With this drive, Opportunity passed 29 kilometers (18 miles) of total mission odometry.


On Sol 2593 (May 11, 2011), the rover repeated another long drive to the east of about 117 meters (384 feet). The science team spied an interesting crater in the distance, so on Sol 2594 (May 12, 2011), Opportunity drove 72 meters (236 feet) to stop near the crater named Skylab for a brief imaging sequence before moving on with a drive planned for the next sol.


As of Sol 2594 (May 12, 2011), solar array energy production was 382 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.816 and a solar array dust factor of 0.514.


Total odometry is 29,278.59 meters (29.28 kilometers, or 18.19 miles).


Opportunity Update Archive


Trekwolf164

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Report this Jun. 06 2011, 8:03 am

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Opportunity Studies Rock Outcrop - sols 2608-2614, May 26 - June 01, 2011:


Opportunity has exceeded 30 kilometers (nearly 19 miles) of odometry! The rover spent the last few sols investigating some exposed rock outcrop en route to Endeavour crater, now just a few kilometers away.


On Sol 2608 (May 26, 2011), Opportunity bumped 60 centimeters (24 inches) to position the outcrop targets within reach of the robotic arm instruments. On Sol 2611 (May 29, 2011), the rover used the Microscopic Imager (MI) to collect an extensive mosaic of the exposed outcrop. Opportunity then conducted a MI poker test, which exhibited anomalous behavior the last time it was used. The test indicated positive switch trip on just one of three tries. The project is investigating this further.


The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) was placed on the surface target, named Valdivia for a multi-sol integration. On Sol 2614 (June 1, 2011), Opportunity drove away with a 146-meter (479-foot) drive, crossing the 30 kilometer (18.64 mile) odometry mark.


As of Sol 2614 (June 1, 2011), solar array energy production was 408 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.860 and a solar array dust factor of 0.545.


Total odometry is 30,055.50 meters (30.06 kilometers, or 18.68 miles).


Opportunity Update Archive


Trekwolf164

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Report this Jun. 30 2011, 1:19 pm

sols 2635-2640, June 23-28, 2011 Opportunity Is Just Over a Mile From Crater Rim


Opportunity is making excellent progress towards Endeavour crater with only about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) to go before the first landfall on the rim, a place called "Spirit Point."


The rover drove on Sols 2635 and 2637 (June 23 and 25, 2011), covering 138.8 (455 feet) and 126.4 meters (415 feet), respectively. A drive planned for Sol 2640 (June 28, 2011), did not occur because a Deep Space Network (DSN) station outage prevented the uplink of the two-sol plan. The rover, instead, safely executed her on-board runout sequence. The planned drive will be recovered in the subsequent plan. A Quick Fine Attitude (QFA) was performed on Sol 2638 (June 26, 2011), to remove accumulated drift in the rover's inertial measurement unit (IMU or gyros). The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) performed a measurement of atmospheric argon on Sol 2639 (June 27, 2011). The improved energy situation has permitted some early morning ultra-high frequency (UHF) relay passes to return additional science data. AM relay passes were performed early on the morning of Sols 2637 and 2639 (June 25 and 27, 2011).


As of Sol 2640 (June 28, 2011), solar array energy production was 476 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.11 and a solar array dust factor of 0.648.


Total odometry is 31,468.54 meters (31.47 kilometers, or 19.55 miles).


www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

Trekwolf164

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Report this Jul. 18 2011, 10:54 am


sols 2648-2655, July 6-13, 2011 Opportunity Under One Mile from Crater Rim


Opportunity has exceeded 32 kilometers (nearly 20 miles) of distance on Mars and is now less than 1.5 kilometers (approximately a mile) from the first landfall on the rim of Endeavour crater.


On Sol 2649 (July 7, 2011), the rover drove over 141 meters (463 feet) to the southeast. Available energy permitted Opportunity to wake very early for an ultra-high frequency (UHF) relay pass to return extra data to Earth. On Sol 2651 (July 9, 2011), an atmospheric argon measurement was performed with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Also on that sol, a test of trying to warm the rover's electronics to mitigate clock drift was performed by keeping the rover awake longer. On the next sol, the rover drove over 150 meters (492 feet), continuing in the roughly southeast direction towards "Spirit Point" on the rim of Endeavour. Then on Sol 2654 (July 12, 2011), Opportunity drove 80 meters (262 feet) to the southeast, crossing the 32 kilometer (nearly 20-mile) odometry mark.


As of Sol 2655 (July 13, 2011), solar array energy production was 435 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.996 and a solar array dust factor of 0.596.


Total odometry is 32,003.14 meters (32 kilometers, or 19.89 miles).


www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

Trekwolf164

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Report this Aug. 03 2011, 2:04 pm

sols 2663-2669, July 22-28, 2011 Opportunity Completes Four Drives: Studies Rock Outcrop


Opportunity is less than 500 meters (0.31 miles) from "Spirit Point," the first landfall on the rim of Endeavour crater.


The rover drove four times in the last week on Sols 2663, 2664, 2667 and 2668 (July 22, 23, 26 & 27, 2011), totaling over 460 meters (0.29 miles) of drive distance. The right-front wheel currents remain behaved. On Sol 2669 (July 28, 2011), Opportunity paused in her driving to collect a microscopic imager (MI) mosaic of the surface and an overnight alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) spectrum of exposed outcrop. The rover also performed a diagnostic test of the MI poker. The results of that test will be received later today. The plan ahead is more driving.


As of Sol 2668 (July 27, 2011), solar array energy production was 413 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.01 and a solar array dust factor of 0.587.


Total odometry is 32,973.44 meters (32.97 kilometers, 20.49 miles).

Trekwolf164

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Report this Aug. 19 2011, 6:27 am

 




sols 2677-2681, August 05-09, 2011 Opportunity Reaches Endeavour Crater!


Opportunity has arrived at Endeavour crater after a 1000-sol, 13.36 mile (21.5 kilometer) odyssey across the plains of Meridiani.


On Sol 2681(Aug. 9, 2011), Opportunity drove 203 feet (62 meters), crossing the contact that delineates the geology of Cape York on the rim of the giant Endeavour crater. Now begins the next chapter in the surface exploration of Mars, the exploration of clay minerals, minerals that may hold the clues to an ancient, habitable environment in the early, wet Noachian epoch of Mars. The rover previously drove this week on Sol 2678 (Aug. 6, 2011), with a 246-foot (75-meter) drive in the run up to Endeavour.


As of Sol 2681 (Aug. 9, 2011), solar array energy production was 374 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 1.12 and a solar array dust factor of 0.542.


Total odometry is 20.81 miles (33,485.80 meters, or 33.49 kilometers).


www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

lligevets

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Report this Aug. 24 2011, 9:32 am


Thanks for these updates I find them interesting and keeps my own spirit alive in hopes that mankind will one day physically make our way into space and other planets. 

Trekwolf164

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Report this Aug. 26 2011, 4:17 pm

No problem these robots or this one robot has lived for an incredible amount of time and is still functioning.


It is all we have left of the Space program


Opportunity is a great machine made by Americans doing a job that was set to end in 5 years.


Live long and prosper


Opportunity


 


www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

Trekwolf164

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Report this Oct. 27 2011, 7:37 am




Press Releases






 


September 14, 2011

 





NASA Rover Inspects Next Rock at Endeavour



 










'Chester Lake' Bedrock on Rim of Endeavour Crater


'Chester Lake' Bedrock on Rim of Endeavour Crater
An outcrop informally named "Chester Lake" is the second rock on the rim of Endeavour crater to be approached by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity for close inspection with instruments on the rover's robotic arm.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/ASU
Images and Captions










NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is using instruments on its robotic arm to inspect targets on a rock called "Chester Lake."

This is the second rock the rover has examined with a microscopic imager and a spectrometer since reaching its long-term destination, the rim of vast Endeavour crater, in August. Unlike the first rock, which was a boulder tossed by excavation of a small crater on Endeavour's rim, Chester Lake is an outcrop of bedrock.

The rocks at Endeavour apparently come from an earlier period of Martian history than the rocks that Opportunity examined during its first seven-and-a-half years on Mars. More information about the ongoing exploration of Endeavour's rim is at: http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/22660.aspx.

Opportunity and its rover twin, Spirit, completed their three-month prime missions on Mars in April 2004. Both rovers continued for years of bonus, extended missions. Both have made important discoveries about wet environments on ancient Mars that may have been favorable for supporting microbial life. Spirit stopped communicating in 2010. NASA will launch the next-generation Mars rover, car-size Curiosity, this autumn for arrival at Mars' Gale crater in August 2012.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Exploration Rover Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. More information about the rovers is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/rovers and http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marsrovers.


 


###


Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


NEWS RELEASE: 2011-289


 



www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

Trekwolf164

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Report this Nov. 26 2011, 7:03 am

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE:  Scouting Sites for the Winter - sols 2778-2783, November 17-22, 2011:


In preparing for positioning Opportunity for the coming winter, the project has been scouting sites with favorable northerly tilt on the north end of Cape York on the rim of Endeavour Crater.


There are two candidate sites for winter havens that indicate sufficient northerly tilt. Opportunity is investigating one of those two sites with the plan to spend the Thanksgiving holiday there. Because of the coming holiday, the project implemented multi-sol plans for the last three planning days before Thanksgiving.


On Sol 2778 (Nov. 17, 2011), the rover moved just under 39 feet (12 meters) to the south approaching the candidate location. Rover attitude increased to 10 degrees of northerly tilt. On Sol 2780 (Nov. 19, 2011), an atmospheric argon measurement was made with the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). On Sol 2781 (Nov. 20, 2011), Opportunity bumped just under 10 feet (3 meters) to reach an interesting surface target with improved rover tilt. The northerly tilt increased to about 12 degrees.


On Sol 2783 (Nov. 22, 2011), Opportunity made a very small turn to move a surface target within the work volume of the robotic arm. Another atmospheric argon measurement was collected with the APXS later that sol. The plan ahead is to spend Thanksgiving at this location and to collect Microscopic Imager (MI) images of this new surface target, called "Transvaal" along with an APXS measure of the same.


As of Sol 2783 (Nov. 22, 2011), solar array energy production was 297 watt-hours with an atmospheric opacity (Tau) of 0.661 and a solar array dust factor of 0.463.


Total odometry is 21.34 miles (34,342.70 meters or 34.44 kilometers).


Opportunity Update Archive



www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcdZla4gKk0

Antoninus Pius

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POSTS: 131

Report this Dec. 05 2011, 5:38 pm

Amazing. I'd not heard this news. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

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