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Coordinates

Cptkirkfan18

GROUP: Members

POSTS: 706

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 12:45 am

In Star Trek, they always mention coordinates of their position.  I understand the whole X,Y,Z thing, but I do not understand this.  Here is an example;

In the TOS episode "Let That Be Your Last Battlefield", Spock mentions Cheron is located at coordinates 403 Mark 7 and Mark 9.  In "The Wrath of Khan", the coordinates 22,87,04 are mentioned during the training simulation.

Is 22,87,04 a location?  What does Mark mean?  All of this I've researched on the internet but couldn't find a understandable answer.

whitetiger0990

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POSTS: 65

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 9:09 am

I know for sure Mark is the elevation relating to the ship
But I don't know how spacial coordinates work. I think it's all related to the ship like

22,87,04


22 to the right/left of the ship
87 forward/behind the ship
and 04 up/down


Thats my guess

Enterprise1701f

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POSTS: 754

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 10:50 am

here's the lowdown
"turn to heading 111 mark 19"
it means turn 111 degrees starboard (or port depending if it it past 180) and angle up 19 degrees (or down if it is past 270 degrees) the other could be a galatic coordinate system like latitude and longitude

Cptkirkfan18

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POSTS: 706

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 3:58 pm

Quote

here's the lowdown
"turn to heading 111 mark 19"
it means turn 111 degrees starboard (or port depending if it it past 180) and angle up 19 degrees (or down if it is past 270 degrees) the other could be a galatic coordinate system like latitude and longitude


That is what I do not understand, the galactic coordinate system.  How would I figure this out?

benstwa1988

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POSTS: 78

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 4:41 pm

Basically, the co-ordinates are, for example, latitude, longitude and depth. The problem is you need an accurate map of the galaxy in order to calculate co-ordinates.

Cptkirkfan18

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POSTS: 706

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 4:45 pm

Star Trek Star Charts the book is the map of the galaxy, is that accurate enough?

benstwa1988

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POSTS: 78

Report this Jun. 01 2004, 4:59 pm

It could be, but it all depends on the scale of the grids, like on an ordinance survey map. I'm not even sure how they do it on star trek, where they start from, all I know is what I posted above.

Cptkirkfan18

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POSTS: 706

Report this Jun. 02 2004, 1:10 am

While watching the Star Trek Season 1 DVD set I got for Christmas, I was watching the episode "110101".

Near the part where they leave the holodeck, they go up to the computer control interface on the wall on the arch.  Captain Picard asks for position report and the computer replies:

"Coordinates 4159.26 by 81921 by 312 -- heading 233 Mark 45"

now those coordinates are much larger than the 22,87,04 that I posted above that I heard in Star Trek II "Wrath of Khan", can anyone explain?

Garbaron

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POSTS: 575

Report this Jun. 02 2004, 3:34 pm

"Coordinates 4159.26 by 81921 by 312 -- heading 233 Mark 45"

Ok let's see:

Assume the galactic coordinates are Cartesian coordinates then:

x=4159.26
y=81921
z=312

results in a vector v = (x^2+y^2+z^2)^1/2
and gives the target system position from the coordinates base (lets say earth)

from a ships point of view they use spherical coordinates (just two angles required) then

heading 233 Mark 45 (roughly behind your left shoulder pointing up on 45 degrees) gives the direction and elevation to the target system with the ship it self as coordinate base.

Simple as that.
(my interpretation of course)

jttm98

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POSTS: 58

Report this Jun. 02 2004, 4:10 pm

Quote (Garbaron @ June 01 2004, 1:34 pm)
"Coordinates 4159.26 by 81921 by 312 -- heading 233 Mark 45"

Ok let's see:

Assume the galactic coordinates are Cartesian coordinates then:

x=4159.26
y=81921
z=312

results in a vector v = (x^2+y^2+z^2)^1/2
and gives the target system position from the coordinates base (lets say earth)

from a ships point of view they use spherical coordinates (just two angles required) then

heading 233 Mark 45 (roughly behind your left shoulder pointing up on 45 degrees) gives the direction and elevation to the target system with the ship it self as coordinate base.

Simple as that.
(my interpretation of course)

I don't think the size of the numbers is important.

In real life positions are given by two number co-ordinates (eg 342 by 040) representing latitude and longitude (although it would probably be written as 342040).  The size of the number determines the accuracy, so 34 by 04 is the same as 342 by 040, the only difference being the level of accuracy.

Of course, Picard's numbers are each different sizes, which is bizarre

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