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How fast is Warp speed?

Justabaldguy

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POSTS: 8

Report this Feb. 24 2004, 11:07 pm

Is Warp 8 4 times as fast as Warp 2, or do the warp speed increase exponentially?  The library section of startrek.com says it's "geometrically" faster, but how fast?

SaladMan

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POSTS: 149

Report this Feb. 24 2004, 11:32 pm

According to this poster I have...

Warp 1 is one times the speed of light.
Warp 2 is ten times the speed of light.
Warp 5 is 214 times the speed of light.
Warp 8 is 1,000 times the speed of light.
Warp 9 is 1,516 times the speed of light.
Warp 9.6 is 1,909 times the speed of light.
Warp 9.9 is 3,053 times the speed of light.
Warp 9.99 is 7,912 times the speed of light.
Warp 9.9999 is 199,516 times the speed of light.
Warp 10 is infinite times the speed of light (and cannot be reached).

MercuryRapids

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POSTS: 340

Report this Feb. 25 2004, 11:55 am

>>Warp 10 is infinite times the speed of light (and cannot be reached). <<

Unless you're Tom Paris ;)

bad_karma

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POSTS: 251

Report this Feb. 25 2004, 6:00 pm

From one of the startrek source books it said (DS9 or TNG) warp 1 was 42 times the speed of light

Multiple of c = 42 at warp 1

if it doubles speed with each increase in warp integers then its

1=42
2=84
3=168
4=336
5=672
6=1344
7=2688
8=5376
9=10752

but that would mean that warp 10 wouldnt be infinite, if its geometric then it could be infininite but without more data it would be hard to guess what warp speeds = what multiples of c (except that we know that 10 = infinity (curve gone verticle))

Gesyn

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POSTS: 328

Report this Feb. 26 2004, 9:57 am

From the Star Trek Encyclopedia (therefore official):

Warp    1=    1xC
Warp    2=  10xCWarp    3=  39xC
Warp    4= 102xC
Warp    5= 214xC
Warp    6= 392xC
Warp    7= 656xC
Warp    8=1024xC
Warp    9=1516xC
Warp  9.9=3053xC
Warp   10=Infinite

C=Speed of light
x=multiplication function

Justabaldguy

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POSTS: 8

Report this Feb. 26 2004, 11:13 pm

That's what I was looking for.  However, I thought I remember Dr. Crusher's ship had Warp 13 capabilities in All Good Things.  Am I not remembering this correctly, or is this an "elseworld" type of creative fun?

Vold

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POSTS: 16223

Report this Feb. 26 2004, 11:54 pm

Imagine this

Warp 9 - 000
Warp 10 - 000000000000000000000000000000000000 & so on

You see the gigantic gap between the latest warp 9 & warp 10?

Well 13, is somewhere in the middle.

Just because the number 13 is bigger then 10, doesn't mean the warp is faster. Its just a name for each step, so happens number 10 hits a barrier where it reaches infinite speed.

Gesyn

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POSTS: 328

Report this Feb. 27 2004, 11:57 am

Quote (Justabaldguy @ Feb. 25 2004, 9:13 pm)
That's what I was looking for.  However, I thought I remember Dr. Crusher's ship had Warp 13 capabilities in All Good Things.  Am I not remembering this correctly, or is this an "elseworld" type of creative fun?

The warp designations were re-calibrated between TOS & TNG.  Thus TOS Enterprise went faster than warp 10 on a couple of occaisions.

The part of All Good Things you refer to takes place in the future.  Perhaps they decided to redefine the warp scale yet again--it could have been easier to think of spped x as warp 13 instead of sy warp 9.9.  Another thing to consider is that that particular future never happened.

Vold

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POSTS: 16223

Report this Feb. 27 2004, 12:01 pm

Actually some of that future did happened.

New engines brought back by Voyager hense creating whatever this "Warp 13" is.

Which I agree on your idea of
"warp 13 instead of sy warp 9.9."

which is the same idea I myself have. But some people just don't get it.
:)

lokysworld

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POSTS: 5

Report this Feb. 29 2004, 12:04 am

According to my Tec Manual dated 7511.01, Warp 8 is 153,487,872 k.p.s=1 PC/5.56 hours(T) T=Real Time

Vold

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POSTS: 16223

Report this Feb. 29 2004, 12:12 am

Warp Scale

or

http://www.ditl.org/scitech/hedwarpscales.htm

incase the top link don't work, use the bottom address, they are both the same.

:logical:

JohnSullivan

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POSTS: 1941

Report this Feb. 29 2004, 11:47 am

Warp speed is fast enough to get you a ticket in most States - if they can even pick you up on radar, which they won't.

At "Warp One" - the speed of light which we know is impossible but let's just forget that for now, you would circle the Earth's equator seven times in one second. Move over, Concord, here comes Warpord! At that rate, it's a wonder they even bother to transport down the the surface using that slow, old-fashioned Transporter. Should be able to warp there in a flash. If you would turn for a pass on the Moon, you would get there in less than a second. If Mars is near Earth as both run around the Sun in different lanes of the track, then a direct path will get you to Mars in four minutes and twenty seconds - at Warp One. If Mars is on the other side of the Sun you would first have to cross through the Sun eight minutes and twelve seconds out of Earth, and assuming you could do that (you're already going the speed of light which is impossible anyway so why not?) your trip from Earth to Mars, including the short-cut through the Sun would be 20 minutes and 56 seconds - at Warp One.

Jupiter? Let's just average it out at 43 minutes out of Earth at Warp One.

Pluto? Five hours and 28 minutes at Warp One. So forget all of the nonsense by Kirk of risking "going to Warp Speed While Still Inside The Solar System." Perhaps he meant "The Inner Solar System?" Or perhaps he meant to say "I can't find my way around my own ship, or my own solar system any more! And save the Xindi puppies if you're human!"

If you're in a hurry and want to get to Pluto at Warp Factor Eight, you'll be at Pluto in just under 19 minutes, and you wouldn't even have left Earth's star system yet. At Warp Factor Eight on this scale, you'll be out of Earth's system and around Alpha Centauri in 3 days and about 1.5 hours. How far to Altair 6 at Warp Factor Eight?  About 12 days. Rigel 12? A year and a half. Denobula? (Yes, to my amazement there really is such a place) 25 days. Deneb 5? At Warp Factor 8, a one-way trip is two years, 10 months, and an odd number of days. Sit back and enjoy a very long ride going anywhere. How fast is Warp Speed? Fast enough to get a speeding ticket in most States, and about 27,000 times faster than the International Space Station is now traveling, which is 250 times faster than the 70 m.p.h. limit in most States.

It's fast. What I like about Warp Speed is you can send a message at light speed from Earth orbit, jet (or warp) to Jupiter at Warp Factor Two in only five minutes, and in thirty-eight minutes you'll be able to hear your own message come in. And once you get there, if you have a really good telescope, you can see yourself in Earth orbit before you left. It's the ultimate in "Instant Replay." And, you can also see yourself warp out of Earth's orbit. Not sure you'll see the streak of you getting from there to where you are, though. But warp is cool! Even when we do it, we ain't going anywhere fast, even then.

JohnSullivan

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POSTS: 1941

Report this Feb. 29 2004, 6:45 pm

I really hope someday they fix that "warp" formula. It even gets more confusing than that, as over the years people have come up with some kind of chi factor that relates your warp power production as a warp factor, but which ties your speed through that space to its particle density and other such factors. Kind of why a boat can get a lot better milage through water at a given prop setting than it could through the air. It makes sense, but it all is for nothing since they all agree that "Warp Factor One" is the speed of light, which is PRETTY close to the most stupid stuff I've ever heard in my life.

That's why I took a page right out of my years flying around in Navy aircraft and I look at Sublight travel as traveling over a runway on wheels and Superoptic (hyper-light/warp/whatever) travel as taking off in a winged vehicle. To reach "flight" speeds in aircraft, you have to maintain a certain speed and engine power output, or you're literally going to crash so violently back into the "suboptic" Universe (the ground) that it ain't going to be pretty.

So, I said "what the heck - what's to stop me from making this stall speed a VERY HIGH number? I figured once I got above the speed of light (or as a heavier-than-aircraft into the air, as it were) what's to stop me from saying an F-18 can't fly under 100 m.p.h. (a guess) or my space ship can't go slower than 100 light years per hour?

So I stuck with that 100 light years per hour figure and thus that is the "stall speed." If you drop below that, then the integrity of your universe will fall apart and you will find yourself back on the ground - possibly in an uncontrolled and fatal manner if you're not careful.

100 light years per hour is 876,600 times faster than Star Trek's "Warp One." Pilots and the like in my field will tell you that Mach One can mean any number of things, depending on how high you are, so I threw out that inspiration entirely, especially since I never really have to face that barrier of light speed - or even come close to it between how fast I WAS traveling and how fast I AM traveling once those souped-up engines are on.

Yet, even so, it still takes 40 days and 40 nights at 100 light years per hour to cross the galaxy from one end to the other, while at Warp Eight on the TOS Scale NCC-1701 would take 195 years to do it, and at Warp Eight on the TNG scale NCC-1701D would take 14 years to do it. I rest my case with my system, as I simply didn't have time to screw around with such a laborously slow ship. All the same, my ship has to refuel every 10,000 light years, and apparently the Star Trek ships don't.

And again, that's just one single line that takes 40 days. Assuming it would take 2 passes through each degree as the galaxy is seen from above to even make a good guess of the galaxy using sensors capable of measuring out to a sphere equal to where you would have no LINEAR gaps (at the widest, these passes would actually drill exploration coverage tunnels in pairs through each degree (360) that would look like a "figure 8") that still means, without compensating for lateral turns from one pass to another, a mapping mission that would take 78 years for a single ship at STALL speed to map the galaxy.

So I've done the math and figured that in addition to all of this, there must be a lot of stable wormholes around the galaxy that Berman never told us about for the Star Trek ships to get around the galaxy as much as they do. If a Galaxy Class starship can make it all the way across the galaxy from one end to the other at Warp 8 in only 14 years, though. Janeway was just out there screwing around if she thought it was going to take her a full 70 years.

Cel

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POSTS: 37

Report this Mar. 01 2004, 8:44 am

I don't think that there has ever really been an onscreen definition to just how fast warp speeds are. I mean, the so-called "TOS and TNG scales" really aren't canon as far as actual usage in any Trek series--not to mention that neither scale actually holds up with onscreen material either.

Yes, you can probably say it's because of carlessness on the part of the writing staff, but if no Trek series has ever used either warp scale anyway, then I guess you wonder just how valid the warp scales actually are.

The only thing we know for certain is that the higher the warp factor, the higher the speed is...

CaptainProton02

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POSTS: 1536

Report this Mar. 01 2004, 5:08 pm

The warp scale as describe in the Tech Manual is the best reference source. It's more than likely the future as seen in AGT is Q induced thus not "cannon." Although this is widely acceptable it doesn't explain how the Borg Transwarp Condiut or how the Quantum slipstream drive function. IIRC LaForge and Data used a subspace generated corridor to cross several hundred light years in a matter of minutes where normal limitations of warp does not apply.

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